Pra U-Tong Awk Seuk (Pra Pong Supan)

Pra U-Tong Awk Seuk – Jong Ang Seuk Edition 2510 BE – Wat Pra Sri Radtana Maha Tat (Supanburi)

The ‘Pra U-Tong Awk Seuk’ amulet, was made and first blessed in the year 1510 BE in a large Buddha Abhiseka Blessing ceremony at Wat Pra Sri Radtana Maha Tat temple, in Supanburi. One can see that the amulet is indeed the same features as the classic Pra Kru Pong Supan, ancient Pra-Kru hiding place amulet of Supanburi Province, whose original archeological find of U-Tong Era amulets was of course also at Wat Pra Sri Radtana Maha Tat. This is of course intentional, but in the case of this edition, was given the special name of Pra U-Tong Awk Seuk’

The amulet is known as the ‘Jong Ang Seuk’ edition, because a large number of them (25,700 amulets) were sent to distribute to the soldiers who had travelled to fight in the Vietnam War, to protect them in battle. The remainder of the amulets which were not sent to the warriors on the front lines, were not distributed at first, and were passed through a further 2 Buddha Abhiseka blessing ceremonies. The first of those further two ceremonies was held between the 2nd and 10th March 2511 Be, and the second extra blessing ceremony was held on the 13th April 2511 BE. Thereafter, most of the remaining amulets were distributed to civil servants and those in governmental offices, and the last remaining amulets were then kept stored away in the Kru Hiding Chamber in the year 2512 BE

The Pra U-Tong Awk Seuk is a classic and historically famous edition of Wat Pra Sri Radtana Mahatat, in Supannburi, that is modelled in similarity to the Pra Pong Supan’Pim Hnaa Gae’ Benjapakee amulet of Supreme Fame and Reverence. Although this edition is commonly known to have the Pim Hnaa Gae Nang Samadhi Khat Paetch Meditating Buddha Image (both hands clasped together facing upwards on the lap), there were actually also some models made, which have a Buddha Image seated in the Mara Vichai (Conquering Mara) Posture, with one hand reaching down to touch the earth.

The Muan Sarn and features of the amulet are rich in Nuances, and provide and excellent exhibit for viewing as study material for the Pra Pong Supan Pim Hnaa Gae type amulet, and its features.

Klaew Klaad Maha Amnaj, Serm Yos, Kong Grapan Chadtri, Maha Ud Power for those in lines of duty where the ability to instil confidence and trust, convince others of your will, and survive great dangers, increase status and chances of promotion. Such are the powers of the Pra U-Tong Awk Seuk Jong Ang Seuk Pong Supan amulet, and all Pra Pong Supan of the Benjapakee Class family of amulets.

Monks present in the ceremony included Luang Por Mui (Wat Don Rai), Luang Por Thin (Wat Pa Lelai, in Supanburi), Luang Por Khom (Wat Rong Phai Wua, Supanburi), Luang Por Huad, (Wat Don Po Tong), Luang Por Pae (Wat Pikul Tong), Luang Por An (Wat Prayatikaram, Ayuttaya), Luang Por Tim (Wat Pra Khaw, Ayuttaya), Luang Por Ngern (Wat Don Yai Horm),and Luang Por Noi (Wat Dhamma Sala, Nakorn Pathom), amongst a total of 69 Guru Masters present in all.

Pra U-Tong Awk Seuk (Pra Pong Supan)

Pra sum gor ancient amulet

Pra Sum Gor Chud 2 – Luang Phu Tim (Wat Laharn Rai) – ‘Nuea Pong Pasom Jinda Manee‘ – This Pra Sum Gor blessed by the Great Luang Phu Tim, was released in aid of the Dhamma, due to needed funds for the temple of Wat Pai Lom, in Amper Ban Kay (Rayong) close to the temple of Luang Phu Tim. 

It was the case with this great master, as is the case with almost all of his surviving apprentice masters such as Luang Por Sakorn, and Luang Phu Sin that, The masters would not release Amulets at his own great temple, but would agree to release Amulets for smaller temples around the area and in other areas, to help in their development for the cause of Buddhism. 

For this reason, most of his famous amulets were released at a large variety of different temples and for many different funding projects which is part of what makes this great master, and his apprenticed masters who are still still alive today, so great, and meritorious. 

Pra Sum Gor Luang Phu Tim

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