Presenting a close up look at a pristinely well preserved and rare Pra Khun Phaen Pong Prai Kumarn, with 6 code stamps on front face, and Pra Somdej indent on rear face, with bronze wanich and sai rae tong kam golden coating. This is a master class Khun Phaen of LP Tim, which won first prize trophy during the August 2561 BE LP Tim amulet competition of the Samakom Luead Ban Kaay Luang Phu Tim amulet association.

Pra Khun Phaen Pong Prai Kumarn Luang Por Tim

This Model is  Pra Khun Phaen pok Pim Niyom Sao Mee Sen, in Pink Prai Kumarn Powders with Sai rae Tong Kam golde  coating, 6 code stamps on front face, amd Pra Somdej coin impression indented into rear face.  this Amulet won first prize trophy during the highly esteemed Amulet competition of the Luead Ban Kaay Lp Tim Amulets association, for its impressive beauty and originality, in the category of Pra Khun Phaen with coin impressions in rear face.

Luang Phu Tim Issarigo, was of course not only one of the most highly acclaimed and sought after Guru Monks for his amulets in his lifetime, amd posthumously, but is also the holder of the highest esteem in Thai Buddhist amulet history for Pong Prai Kumarn powders. Luang Phu Tim, is Internationally Acclaimed, for his famous Pra Khun Phaen Pong Prai Kumarn, and Look Om powder balls.


As to the classic ‘Rian’ type coin image amulets which have become all time favourites, and eternally, world famous classic amulets of the high end variety. His rian Jaroen Porn, and Rian Nakprok Paed Rorp are amongst the most highly sought after coin amulets of all.


An exquisitely beautiful Pra Khun Phaen Prai Kumarn 2515 BE Pim Yai Niyom Block Tong Hlueang (Block 2) Hlang Dtok Dtaeng Niyom Nuea Chompoo with Khaw Hniaw Suk & Pong Prai Kumarn Ta Bronze Wanich Dtem Ongk, code Sala (crown code stamp), code 3, and quadruple code Pidta embossed on the front face, with the indented image of a Rian Pra Somdej Lor LP Tim embossed into the rear face as an indentation.


Pra Kru Wat Geng Jeen Nuea Chin Pim Pra Sawok Niyom - Sacred Leaden Ancient Hiding Place Amulet Late Ayuttaya Period

SKU 03202
$129 U.S.
In stock
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Product Details

A preferred Pim Niyom model of the Pra Kru Wat Geng Jeen Cast Leaden hiding place amulet find, over 200 years old, from the Ayuttaya Period, this model being the Pim Pra Sawok, also known as 'Pim Pra Mokkhalla' and 'Pim Pra Saribut'

The words 'Pra Sawok' means 'Savaka', or 'disciple' of the Buddha. It refers in this case to the Arahants Sariputra and Mokkhallana (also called Maugdalyāyāna, and Maha-Moggallana).The image can indeed be used for either of these Arahants, as they are both mostly featured in this sideways praying posture seated either side of the Dais the Buddha sits on under the Bodhi tree.

The Pra Kru Wat Geng Jeen amulet find occurred around the year 2515 BE, at the abandoned temple of Wat Geng Jeen, in Rayong, when a large batch of leaden amulets were discovered at the temple. The amulets were created towards the end of the Ayuttaya period, just before the Ratanakosin Era. The amulets were created by Pra Ajarn Geng, who was then the abbot of Wat Geng Jeen. The amulets were found in many different designs and images, numbering over 70 different Pim in all. Some are very common to find still, and others are much rarer.


The Kruu Wat Geng Jeen amulets are known for their 'Sanim Daeng' reddish beige rust forming as 'Kraap Kru on the front, and that most of them were originally coated in gold leaf in manu cases. The rear faces of the amulets have a fine layer of white cement from the Kru chamber adhering to the surface, which is one of the criteria used for recognising this particula Pra Kru, for they all have some to greater or lesser degree on the rear face.

The rarer and more highly sought after models include the Pim Mara Wichai Thaan Pha Tip, the Pim Samati Thaan Song Chan, the Pim Mokkhallana or Saributra (Pim Sawok - praying monk listening to the Buddha - can be seen as either Maugalyayana Arahant, or Sariputra Arahant), and the various models of which only few were found, and are extremely rare, such as the Pra Sangkajjai, Prajam Wan Birthday Buddhas, Pim Pra Nakprok, and the Pim Pra Pratan Thaan Tip.

Pra Ajarn Geng, the maker of the amulets back in the late Ayuttaya period, was a famous Kammathana Master Monk of his time. It is believed by experts that Pra Ajarn Geng, the maker of the Pra Kru Wat Geng Jin amulets, was the original Kroo Ba Ajarn who bestowed his magical Wicha onto some of the Great Masters of Olden days we know, such as Luang Por Dto of Wat Khao Bor Tong, Luang Por Am, of Wat Nong Grabork, the Great Luang Phu Tim of Wat Laharn Rai, and Luang Por Tarb of Wat Nong Grabok Kheun Pheung.

Below; One of the other preferred models of the Kru Wat Geng Jeen; the Pim Thaan Pha Tip

Maugdalyāyāna (Mokkhallā)

was one of the Sakyamuni Buddha's closest disciples. A contemporary of disciples such as Subhuti, Śāriputra, and Mahākasyapa, he is considered the second of the Buddha's two foremost disciples (foremost in psychic powers), together with Śāriputra. Maudgalyāyana became a spiritual wanderer in his youth, together with his friend Śāriputra. After heaving searched for a while, they came into contact with the Buddhist teaching and eventually the Buddha himself. Maudgalyāyana attained enlightenment shortly after that. As a teacher, he became known for his psychic powers, which he used extensively in his teaching methods. He died at the age of eighty-four, being killed through the efforts of a rivaling sect. This violent death has been described in Buddhist scriptures as a result of Maudgalyāyana's karma of having killed his own parents in a previous life. In the Pali Canon, it is described that Maudgalyāyana had a skin color like a blue lotus or a rain cloud. Oral tradition in Sri Lanka says that this was because he was born in hell in many lifetimes.


Magdalyāyāna in Mahayāna Tradition;

In Mahāyāna texts, Maudgalyāyana became known for his filial piety through a popular account of him transferring his merits to his mother. The account led to a tradition in China and Japan known as the ghost festival, during which people dedicate their merits to their ancestors. Maudgalyāyana has also traditionally been associated with meditation and sometimes Abhidharma texts, as well as the Dharmaguptaka school. In the nineteenth century, relics were found attributed to him.

Sariputra/Saribut

Sāriputta (Pali) or Sanskrit Śāriputra (Sinhala: ශාරීපුත්‍ර මහ රහතන් වහන්සේ), was one of two chief male disciples of Gautama Buddha along with Moggallāna, counterparts to the bhikkhunis Khema and Uppalavanna, his two chief female disciples. He became an arhat renowned for his teaching and is depicted in the Theravada tradition as one of the most important disciples of the Buddha. Śāri was his mother's name and is also a particular bird's name.[citation needed] Putra meant boy or child. He was also called Upatissa. This name came from his father's name, Tissa. In the Japanese language he is called Sharihotsu (舎利弗)

Use the Traditional Thai Buddhist Method for Bucha;

1. Chant Maha Namasakara (3 Times)

2. Chant the Trai Soranakom (3 Times)

3. Chant Kata Aaraatanaa Pra Krueang (3 Times)

Kata Maha Namasakara

Namo Dtat-Sa Pakawa-Dto Araha-Dto Sam-Maa Sam-Put-Dtat-Sa

Namo Dtat-Sa Pakawa-Dto Araha-Dto Sam-Maa Sam-Put-Dtat-Sa

Namo Dtat-Sa Pakawa-Dto Araha-Dto Sam-Maa Sam-Put-Dtat-Sa


Trai Soranakom

Puttang Cheewidtang Yaawa Nipaanang Saranang Kajchaami

Tammang Cheewidtang Yaawa Nipaanang Saranang Kajchaami

Sangkang Cheewidtang Yaawa Nipaanang Saranang Kajchaami

Tudtiyambpi Puttang Cheewidtang Yaawa Nipaanang Saranang Kajchaami

Tudtiyambpi Tammang Cheewidtang Yaawa Nipaanang Saranang Kajchaami

Tudtiyambpi Sangkang Cheewidtang Yaawa Nipaanang Saranang Kajchaami

Dtadtiyambpi Puttang Cheewidtang Yaawa Nipaanang Saranang Kajchaami

Dtadtiyambpi Tammang Cheewidtang Yaawa Nipaanang Saranang Kajchaami

Dtadtiyambpi Sangkang Cheewidtang Yaawa Nipaanang Saranang Kajchaami


Kata Aaraatana Pra Krueang

Puttang Aaraatanaanang

Tammang Aaraatanaanang

Sangkang Aaraatanaanang

Puttang Prasittimae

Tammang Prasittimae

Sangkang Prasittimae

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