Phra Pidta Mekasit LP Nak

The Phra Pidta of LP Nak is a highly revered amulet created by the late great Thai monk Luang Phor Nak of Wat Huay Jorake temple in Nakhon Pathom, Thailand. The Phra Pidta, also known as “the closed-eye Buddha,” is a representation of the Lord Buddha in deep meditation, entering the state of Nirodha, and is believed to bring blessings of protection, good luck, and wealth to the wearer.

Pra Pid Ta Luang Pu Nak Wat Huay Jorake

The Phra Pidta amulet created by LP Nak was made usually in Nuea Mekasit alcemical metal, but also in sacred loha chanuan bronze and other brazen metal mixtures (less often seen). I is said that LP Nak himself was an adept master of alchemical metallurgy, and the Wicha Pra Pidta. It found in medium and small sizes (Pim Lek & Pim Yai) and has various models sch as the Pra Pid Ta Hoo Gradtay ‘Rabbit Ears’ model. It is believed that the Phra Pidta amulet of LP Nak has the power to protect its wearer from harm, bring good luck, and attract wealth and prosperity. Some of the Pra Pid Ta of Luang Pu Nak possess hand inscriptions scratched onto the surface of the metal, with Khom Agkhara and Sacred Yant.

Phra Pidta amulet represents a meditating Buddha entering into the state of Nirodha. Nirodha is the third of the Buddha’s Four Noble Truths and refers to the attainment of the cessation of suffering. The image of a meditating Buddha is representative of the amulet’s ability to bring peace and block out all forms of inauspicious events and bad luck, protect against all dangers and black magic. The amulet is believed to have the power to block out negative energy and to protect the wearer from harm due to the reputation of the creator and his spiritual energy.

Luang Pu Nak was a well-known Thai Buddhist monk and the abbot of Wat Huay Jorake temple in Nakhon Pathom, Thailand. He was well-known for his spiritual teachings and wisdom, as well as his ability to craft powerful amulets. His reputation as a powerful spiritual leader, combined with his ability to craft powerful amulets, ensures that his legacy lives on, and his amulets are highly sought after. He died in 1959, but his teachings and amulets are still revered and respected by many Thais and people all over the world.

Luang Pu Nak, of Wat Huay Jorake in Nakhon Pathom

Many people in Thailand and around the world believe that the Phra Pidta amulet of LP Nak is particularly powerful for Kong Grapan/Klaew Klaad Protection Magic, due to the reputation his Pidta developed over the years as many stories of lifesaving miracles were recounted by devotees who wore the Pidta of LP Nak. LP Nak was known for his deeply spiritual teachings, and his ability to create very powerful amulets, and many people believe that his amulets possess his spiritual mind energy even after his passing. The Phra Pidta amulet of LP Nak is also highly sought after by collectors and those interested in Thai Buddhism and culture. Many people consider it a valuable possession and it is often passed down from generation to generation as a family heirloom amulet.

The Phra Pidta amulet of LP Nak is a highly revered and powerful amulet created by the late Thai monk Luang Phor Nak of Wat Huay Jorake temple in Nakhon Pathom, Thailand. It is believed to bring blessings of protection, good luck, and wealth to the wearer, and is highly sought after by collectors and those interested in Thai Buddhism and culture. The reputation of LP Nak as a powerful spiritual leader, and his ability to create powerful amulets, makes this amulet particularly valuable and powerful.

Luang Pu Nak, was a Thai Buddhist monk who lived in the 19th- 20th century. He was the abbot of Wat Huay Jorake temple in Nakhon Pathom, Thailand. He was born in 2358 BE (1884) and passed away in 2452 BE (1972). Luang Pu Nak was known for his great compassion and spiritual wisdom, and was a great giver of spiritual teachings, as well as his skill in creating powerful amulets. He was highly respected by the local community and by other monks in Thailand. He was also known for his generosity and mercy, and his dedication to helping others.

During his tenure as abbot, he worked to strengthen the spiritual community at Wat Huay Jorake and to provide guidance and support to the local population. In addition to his work as an abbot, Luang Pu Nak was known for his skill in creating powerful amulets. He was able to create amulets using various materials, including clay, metal, and even human bone. His amulets were believed to possess spiritual power and provide protection to the wearer. They were often inscribed with sacred texts or mantras, and were highly sought after by the local population and by collectors. Luang Pu Nak’s amulets are very highly valued in the present day, and many people in Thailand and around the world believe that they possess spiritual power. His amulets are often passed down from generation to generation as a family heirloom, and are considered a valuable possession.

Luang Pu Nak may have passed away long ago, but his legacy continues to be felt in Thailand and around the world. He is remembered as a wise and compassionate spiritual leader, and his amulets are still highly sought after by aficionados, faithful devotees, collectors, and those interested in Thai Buddhism and Thai culture. To this very day, the lineage of abbots of Wat Huay Jorake still make and release Phra Pidta amulets of the Wicha passed down to them through a constant succession in the magical lineage of Luang Pu Nak. The Phra Pidta amulet of LP Nak, is believed to be particularly powerful because it is believed to possess the magical energy of the monk who created it. As Luang Pu Nak is considered a highly respected and powerful spiritual leader, it is believed that his Pidta amulets will always possess his spiritual energy even after his passing, without ever fading. Thew Pidta Mekasit amulet, is considered the most famous and powerful amulet created by Luang Pu Nak.

Old Photo of Luang Pu Nak Wat Huay Jorake

 

Background Info on Phra Pidta

Since very early times in Thailand, Pra Pid Ta amulets, as well as Pra Pid Ta in the shape of Pha Yant and Bucha sculptures, have been made as objects of adoration and protection. Using the Buddhist sculpture and art that was accessible at the time, the artisans of that era developed a variety of styles and interpretations. Various Buddhas, Bodhisattvas, or Deities are fashioned into the posture of Pra Pid ta, or Pid Tawarn (meaning “closing the orifices”), to create the Pid ta posture (‘Pid Ta’ means “covering the eyes”). Pid Tawarn can seal 7, or 9 orifices (the number 7 is referred to as Pra Pid Sadtatawarn, while the number 9 is known as Pra Pid Navatawarn). The Phra Pidta amulet, also known as “the closed-eye Buddha,” is believed to bring blessings of protection, good luck, and wealth to the wearer.

Pra Pid Ta Maekasit Pim Hoo Gradtay Luang Phu Nak Wat Huay Jorakahae

The Phra Pidta amulet, represents a meditating monk entering into the state of Nirodha. Nirodha is the third of the Buddha’s Four Noble Truths and it refers to the attainment of the cessation of suffering. In Buddhist teachings, Nirodha is understood as the state of being where all mental defilements, such as ignorance, greed, and hatred, have been completely eliminated. This state is reached through the practice of meditation and the cultivation of wisdom, and it is considered the ultimate goal of Buddhism.

Base of Pra Pid Ta Maekasit Pim Hoo Gradtay Luang Phu Nak

The third of the four noble truths according to Buddhist tradition is defined as Nirodha Sacca (also spelt Nirodha Sacca in Pali; Nirodha Satya in Sanskrit). Sacca denotes “truth” or “reality,” whereas Nirodha means cessation or extinction. Therefore, the translation of nirodha sacca is generally “truth of cessation” or “truth of the cessation of suffering.” It explicitly refers to the cessation of Dukkha (suffering) and its causes; the resultant experience is defined as nirvana. Nirodha can indicate a variety of things, such as release, cessation, extinction, the end of dukkha, and “control or restraint.” The cessation of all unsatisfactory experiences and their causes in a way that prevents them from occurring again is what Nirodha Sacca means. It is their elimination, complete absence, cessation, and ceasing from existing.

Rear Face Pra Pid Ta Maekasit Pim Hoo Gradtay Luang Phu Nak Wat Huay Jorakahae

The image of a meditating Buddha entering Nirodha, is representative of the amulet’s ability to bring peace and block out all forms of inauspicious events and bad luck. It is believed that by wearing the Phra Pidta amulet, the wearer will be protected against all dangers and black magic. The amulet is believed to have the power to block out negative energy and to protect the wearer from harm. Famouls for their Kong Grapan, Metta, Klaew Klaad, and Maha Lap Magic.

Kata Pra Pid Ta

Namo Puttassa Kawambadtissa Namo Tammassa Kawambadtissa Namo Sangkassa Kawambadtissa Sukha Sukha Warang Na Mo Puttaaya Ma A U Tugkhang Anijjang Anatta Jewa


Luang Por Dam

A Rare Loi Ongk Pra Pid Ta Thaan Sung (high Dais) Buddha Image Statuette amulet, in Nuea Pong Kluk Rak, with hand inscribed Yant Putto, and Khom Inscriptions, from the Great Luang Por Dam, of Wat Mai Nopparam, in Naratiwat Province, in the deep South of Thailand on the Malay border. Luang Por Dam was the first apprentice in the Wicha of Pra Pid Ta Magic, to the Great Luang Por Kron, of Wat Bang Sae. This exhibit differs from many, in the fact that it has had red Rak Chart Jeen Boran coated on the base.

Phra Pidta Luang Por Dam Wat Mai Nopparam15

The Pid Ta is made using the very same Muan Sarn Sacred Powders admixture, empowerment, and inscriptions, as those of the Great Luang Por Kron, and the Pra Pid Ta of Luang Por Dam himself, have now become legendary in their own right, and stand alone on their own merits as Pra Niyom master Class Category amulets.

 

LP Dam Wat Mai Nopparam

Highly revered and collected by Looksit (Devotees) of his Mentor Luang Por Kron, a Buddhist Master Monk from Malaysia. Luang Por Kron was Abbot of Wat Bang Sae in the province of Kalantan.

He made many Pid Ta amulets which were so very preferred (‘Niyom’). It is said in Thai Amulet circles that, in the same way that we prefer the Pra Somdej Wat Rakang as a Niyom amulet, so, in Malaysia and even Singapore, the Pra Pid Ta of Luang Por Dam, and his Mentor Luang Por Kron, became just as sought after and beloved. Malaysians know Luang Por Dam very well, for his temple is very close to the Malaysian border in Naratiwat, which is one of the reasons LP Dam was able to be a close accomplice of LP Kron, and receive and continue his Wicha.

Rear Face Pra Pid Ta Luang Por Dam

The Pra Pid Ta amulets of Luang Por Dam of Wat Mai Nopparam, have become ever more comparable and popular to those of his Mentor and Wicha Inheritance Kroo Ba Ajarn Luang Por Kron, for the fact that Luang Por Kron’s amulets are almost impossible to find anymore these days, and the Pra Pid Ta of Luang Por Dam have hence become the favored alternative, for they are considered to possess the magic of both Masters.

Below; Luang Por Kron – Wat Uttamaram (Kalimantan Malaysia)

Luang Por Kron of Wat Uttamaram Malaysia
As to Luang Por Dam’s Mentor, LP Kron, Malaysian Buddhists do not often call him Luang Por Kron as Thai people do, rather ‘Tok Racha‘, which means something similar to Thailand’s top Royal Monk always being called ‘Pra Sangkaracha’.

It is said that despite the fact that most of the surrounding households in the vicinity of Luang Por Krons temple were Muslim, that he earned their respect, and was an honored person. He was not called Luang Por Kron by Malays, as we call him in Thailand, rather, was named ‘Tok Raja’, which means ‘ as equal to the Sangha Raja’ .

The reason for this comes from a legend that the daughter of a powerful Sultan of Kalantan was cursed with a black magic spell, which caused his mind to become strangely affected, and even doctors and psychologists could not help to cure him, and even the Muslim witch doctors could not break the spell with their magic.

But Luang Por Kron was able to heal her, and return her to sanity. This caused LP Kron to recieve great respect from the Sultan who then gave him the honorary name of Tok Raja. His most preferred amulets are the Pra Pid Ta, which were mostly hand made molds, in Muan Sarn Sacred Powders with Lacquer (Nuea Pong Kluk Rak), some very few in carved wood, and a very few are sometimes seen in carved ivory.

Pra Pidta Luang Por Dam Nuea Pong Jarn Yant Putto


Luang Por Kron began making Pra Pid Ta amulets sometime around the year 2480 BE onwards, mostly making hand molded clay models, resulting in each one having a very original appearance, some with very wide legs, others less so. Most were made in Nuea Pong Kluk Rak herbal powders with lacquer mixed into the clay, and hand molded, to form an inimitable effect that has made his Pra Pid Ta amulets so original in design.

Many of his hand molded Pid Ta do not have a dais and have very wide legs, whereas others have a more standard form with inscription, and less wide legs, and usually with inscriptions of Unalome and Yant on the surface of the image. His other highly preferred amulets among devotees, are the Rian Roop Dork Jik 1st edition coin of 2500 BE, and the second edition coin, the Rian Roop Khai of 2505 BE.

A Top Master-Class amulet, from LP Dam, first apprentice of Malaysia’s Greatest Master of the Wicha Pra Pid Ta

The Pid Ta can be used as a Loi Ongk Statuette on the altar for Bucha, or be worn as an amulet encased. This exhibit is highly recommended to use for altar worship, as it has a wide sturdy base, and is fitting for placement on flat surfaces.