The World Famous Hun Payont amulet, of Ajarn Loi Po Ngern, Great Ayuttaya Master and direct lineage continuance of the Wicha of Luang Por Glan of Wat Prayatigaram. The Hun Payont of Ajarn Loi, are said to be the number one Hun Payont amulets of all time, and are the most sought after and desired items by devotees of this kind of amulet. Unfortunately, the amulets of this great olden days Master. Perhaps the number one Hun Payont in Historical Documentation, ancient and highly reputed for its power, the Hun Payont of the Great Ajarn Loi Po Ngern, Great Olden  Days Lay Master of the Ayuttaya Province.

Ajarn Loi was born in the month of February 2454 in Nakorn Sawan, but later moved to live in Bang Prahan in Ayuttaya. He became the apprentice of Luang Por Glan of Wat Prayat. After the passing of LP Glan, Ajarn Loi continued his practice of Magic with Luang Por Bpaen of Wat Sao Tong Mai in Ayuttaya.

Ajarn Loi learned many Wicha with Luang Por Bpaen of Wat Sao Tong Mai, who was well versed in Wicha Saiyasart, but Ajarn Loi himself was also Adept in Artisanry of the Chang Sip Moo Fine Arts level of prowess. He thus taught Ajarn Loi all of his Wicha, and methods of weaving the spellbound Hun Payont, Takrut and other amulets, and Ajarn Loi would make them in the finest fashion. Ajarn Loi was a fine artisan of the Chang Sip Moo group, and received Wicha from Luang Por Bpaen, Luang Por Glan, and other masters, but was the most Adept of all at weaving the Hun Payont Golems with his Artistic ability to make the effigies in all sorts of postures, and dress them with all kinds of regalia.

 

The Hun Payont comes from the word ‘Payont’ which means an effigy that has been brought to life by Sorcerous Magick. Hun Payont may be made in various forms, such as the form of a Human, or some other Magickal creature, or animal, depending on the needs of the user and intended uses of the Adept who makes them. Hun Payont are made from various substances, such as the Hun Hyaa Saan (Hay/Straw), Hun Gan Bai Mai San (leaves), Hun Thao Wan (magical vines), Hun Dtakua (mercurial lead), Hun Khee Pheung (wax), Bai Mai Ta (leaves), Hun Gae Salak (carved wood), Hun Daay (cord wrap), Hun Pha (cloth bound), Hun Din (molded claay), Hun Din Phao (baked clay), Hun Hin (carved stone), Hun Krabueang (ceramic), Hun Poon (cement), Hun Ngern/Tong (silver or gold), Hun Loha (Iron)

The Hun Payont, is an amulet that is found to date back to the times of the Kassapa Buddha. The Kassapa Buddha, is said to have made a Payont effigy, to protect his Relics, before he himself passed into Nibbana.

200 Years Later, King Asoka opened a shrine, to remove and preserve the relics, but the shrine was inhabited by a Hun Payont. King Asoka was forced to invoke and summon the God Indra, who manifested as a Brahman, and performed Incantations, enabling King Asoka to enter and remove the Saririkadhatu Relics.

In the world of Sorcery, all lineages believe in the existence of different kinds of spirits, which can be imbued within effigies or controlled, or beseeched to perform a multitude of tasks.

Hun Payont Ya San Mad Daay Daeng Akom Ajarn Loi

There are many Animist and Necromantic amulets which use different types of spirits which are Hoeng Prai Ghosts, Devas, Bhuta, Kumarn Tong, Rak Yom, In Jantr, Phu Some, In Gaew, Mae Takian, Ma Hoeng Prai, and many others such asYaksa Monsters, to inhabit an effigy.
Great Adepts are the only ones able to create Hun Payont Golem Effigies, which are then brought to life with Necromancy and imbued with any of a number of kinds of spirits.  All Hun Payont must be empowered by a Master who has Mastered the Wicha Akarn Sam Sip Sorng 32 invocationss of the 32 elements within a living being, to make the effigy able to displace itself (move around), and to emit magickal Miracles to protect wealth and possessions within its enclave. If intruders enter, the Hun Payont will create illusions that drive the thieves away, and will also scare away all kinds of demons and ghosts that enter the household to cause any havoc. Hun Payont are very protective of the belonging within the home and for this reason excellent guards.


Hun Payont differ from Kumarn Tong, in the sense that the Kroo Ba Ajarn would give life to the Hun Payont himself without necessity to call upon an existing spirit, whereas a Kumarn Tong is reanimated by calling a Bhuta, a Deva or Child Ghost to inhabit the effigy, to help humans, in exchange for an auspicious rebirth in the heavens after its lifetime within the Kumarn.

Ajarn Loi with his Hun Payont

The Hun Payont is also renowned to be able to bring wealth and attract good business, and is open to being asked for favors and to perform missions, such as chasing away your enemies. It is also believed to possess Metta Mahaniyom ‘Great Preference’ Magick, which we know in English, as ‘Mercy Charm’, as it is reputed to attract the compassion and favor, of those who approach and interact with you.

According to the ancient tradition, a Hun Payont should be rewarded and appeased through the Gruad Nam water pouring ceremony when performing prayers and Bucha.


Luang Phu Mun Puritatto

Rian Lai Ganok Sacred Guru Monk Coin with ‘Ganok’ flamed embellishments around the edges, and the Image of Luang Phu Mun Puritadto, of Wat Pha Sutawas emblazoned. This is a limited series Gammagarn version, with series code stamp, which is seen on the Sangkati sash of the Guru Monk, bearing the Code Met Nga Sesame seed shaped stamp, with a Khom Sanskrit Letter embossed.

Luang Phu Mun Thai amulet

The amulet has the images of an almsbowl, a kettle and a Glod Umbrella, the basic traveling necessities of the Thai Tudong Forest Tradition Lineage of LP Mun. The amulet was released in 2520 BE, and is first edition, after Luang Por Kinaree released his own first edition coin with his own image in the year 2519 BE. This series of amulets were fashioned in the same shape, but with the image of Luang Phu Mun Puritatto, blessed by Lineage Master, and Abbot of Wat Gantasilawas, Luang Por Kinaree Jantiyo, in Grand Buddha Abhisekha ceremony. The ceremony was held directly at Wat Gandtasilawas in Nakorn Phanom, with a host of other great Tudong Masters of the Luang Phu Mun Thai Forest Tradition.

The amulet has the Kata ‘namo Wmudtaanang Namo Wimudtiyaa’ on the rear face below the almsbowl, the Kata of LP Mun, representing the heart of the Tudong Kammathana Practice. The amulet is forged from Nuea Tong Daeng Sacred Copper Brazen Alloy, and was blessed on the 13th April 2520 BE after Traimas three month nightly empowerments at the temple beforehand. The amulet has the words ‘Puritadto’ on the front of the base of the amulet, with Luang Phu Mun seated in meditation above.


The amulets were released in the year 2513-2514 BE in a very special Buddha Abhiseka, at the temple of Wat Gantasilaram, with a large number of some of the greatest Guru Masters of the time present to empower, from the lineage of Luang Phu Mun

Ajarn Mun Bhuridatta Thera (Thai: มั่น ภูริทตฺโต, rtgs: Ajarn Mun Phurithatto; Lao: ຫຼວງປູ່ມັ່ນ ພູຣິທັຕໂຕ), 1870–1949, was a Thai bhikkhu of Lao descent who is credited, along with his mentor, Ajarn Sao Kantasīlo, with establishing the Thai Forest Tradition or “Kammaṭṭhāna tradition” that subsequently spread throughout Thailand and to several countries abroad. Ajarn Mun was born in Baan Kham Bong, a farming village in Ubon Ratchathani Province, Isan.
Ordained as a monk in 1893, he spent the remainder of his life wandering through Thailand, Burma, and Laos, dwelling for the most part in the forest, engaged in the practice of meditation. He attracted an enormous following of students and, together with his teacher, Sao Kantasīlo (1861–1941), established the Thai Forest Tradition (the kammaṭṭhāna tradition) that subsequently spread throughout Thailand and to several countries abroad. He died at Wat Suddhavasa, Sakon Nakhon Province.

Ajarn Mun was born in Baan Kham Bong, a farming village in Ubon Ratchathani Province, Isan. Ordained as a monk in 1893, he spent the remainder of his life wandering through Thailand, Burma, and Laos, dwelling for the most part in the forest, engaged in the practice of meditation. He attracted an enormous following of students and, together with his teacher, Sao Kantasīlo (1861–1941), established the Thai Forest Tradition (the Kammaṭhāna tradition) that subsequently spread throughout Thailand and to several countries abroad. He died at Wat Pha Sutawas, Sakon Nakhon Province. (Wikipedia)

We would like to share a passage written by Luang Por Thanissaro Bhikkhu (Ajarn Geoffrey de-Graaf), who wrote a most explanatory essay of the role of the Great Ajarn Mun in the revival of the true Buddhist Practice and the Rise of the Thai Tudong Kammathana Forest tradition;

Throughout its history, Buddhism has worked as a civilizing force. Its teachings on karma, for instance — the principle that all intentional actions have consequences — have taught morality and compassion to many societies. But on a deeper level, Buddhism has always straddled the line between civilization and wilderness. The Buddha himself gained Awakening in a forest, gave his first sermon in a forest, and passed away in a forest.

The qualities of mind he needed in order to survive physically and mentally as he went, unarmed, into the wilds, were key to his discovery of the Dhamma. They included resilience, resolve, and alertness; self-honesty and circumspection; steadfastness in the face of loneliness; courage and ingenuity in the face of external dangers; compassion and respect for the other inhabitants of the forest.

These qualities formed the “home culture” of the Dhamma.
Periodically, as Buddhism spread and adapted to different societies, some practitioners felt that the original message of the Dhamma had become diluted. So they returned to the wilderness in order to revive its home culture. Many wilderness traditions are still alive today, especially in the Theravada countries of Sri Lanka and Southeast Asia. There, mendicant ascetic monks continue to wander through the remaining rainforests, in search of Awakening in the same environment where the Buddha found Awakening himself.

Among these wilderness traditions, the one that has attracted the largest number of Western students, and is beginning to take root in the West, is the Kammatthana (Meditation) Forest tradition of Thailand.

The Kammatthana tradition was founded by Ajarn Mun Bhuridatto in the early decades of this century. Ajarn Mun’s mode of practice was solitary and strict. He followed the Vinaya (monastic discipline) faithfully, and also observed many of what are known as the thirteen classic dhutanga (ascetic) practices, such as living off almsfood, wearing robes made of cast-off rags, dwelling in the forest, eating only one meal a day.

Searching out secluded places in the wilds of Thailand and Laos, he avoided the responsibilities of settled monastic life and spent long hours of the day and night in meditation. In spite of his reclusive nature, he attracted a large following of students willing to put up with the hardships of forest life in order to study with him.
He also had his detractors, who accused him of not following traditional Thai Buddhist customs. He usually responded by saying that he wasn’t interested in bending to the customs of any particular society — as they were, by definition, the customs of people with greed, anger, and delusion in their minds. He was more interested in finding and following the Dhamma’s home culture, or what he called the customs of the noble ones: the practices that had enabled the Buddha and his disciples to achieve Awakening in the first place.

This phrase — the customs of the noble ones — comes from an incident in the Buddha’s life: not long after his Awakening, he returned to his home town in order to teach the Dhamma to the family he had left six years earlier. After spending the night in a forest, he went for alms in town at daybreak. His father the king learned of this and immediately went to upbraid him. “This is shameful,” the king said. “No one in the lineage of our family has ever gone begging. It’s against our family customs.”
“Your majesty,” the Buddha replied, “I now belong, not to the lineage of my family, but to the lineage of the noble ones. Theirs are the customs I follow.” Ajarn Mun devoted many years of his life to tracking those customs down. Born in 1870, the son of rice farmers in the northeastern province of Ubon, he was ordained as a monk in the provincial capital in 1892. At the time of his ordination, there were two broad types of Buddhism available in Thailand; Maha Nikkaya and the Dhammayut Movements.

The first can be called Customary Buddhism — the mores and rites handed down over the centuries from teacher to teacher with little, if any, reference to the Pali canon. For the most part, these customs taught monks to live a sedentary life in the village monastery, serving the local villagers as doctors or fortune tellers. Monastic discipline tended to be loose. Occasionally, monks would go on a pilgrimage they called “dhutanga” which bore little resemblance to the classic dhutanga practices. Instead, it was more an undisciplined escape valve for the pressures of sedentary life. Moreover, monks and lay people practiced forms of meditation that deviated from the path of tranquillity and insight outlined in the Pali canon. Their practices, called vichaa aakhom, or incantation knowledge, involved initiations and invocations used for shamanistic purposes, such as protective charms and magical powers. They rarely mentioned nirvana except as an entity to be invoked for shamanic rites. The second type of Buddhism available at the time, was Reform Buddhism, based on the Pali canon and begun in the 1820’s by Prince Mongkut, who later became King Rama IV (and still later was portrayed in the musical The King and I).

Prince Mongkut was ordained as a monk for twenty-seven years before ascending the throne. After studying the canon during his early years as a monk, he grew discouraged by the level of practice he saw around him in Thai monasteries. So he reordained among the Mons — an ethnic group that straddled the Thai-Burmese border and occupied a few villages across the river from Bangkok — and studied Vinaya and the classic dhutanga practices under the guidance of a Mon teacher. Later, his brother, King Rama III, complained that it was disgraceful for member of the royal family to join an ethnic minority, and so built a monastery for the Prince-Monk on the Bangkok side of the river. There, Mongkut attracted a small but strong following of like-minded monks and lay supporters, and in this way the Dhammayut (lit., In Accordance with the Dhamma) movement was born.

In its early years, the Dhammayut movement was an informal grouping devoted to Pali studies, focusing on Vinaya, the classic dhutanga practices, a rationalist interpretation of the Dhamma, and the revival of meditation techniques taught in the Pali canon, such as recollection of the Buddha and mindfulness of the body. None of the movement’s members, however, could prove that the teachings of the Pali canon actually led to enlightenment. Mongkut himself was convinced that the path to nirvana was no longer open, but he felt that a great deal of merit could be made by reviving at least the outward forms of the earliest Buddhist traditions. Formally taking a bodhisattva vow, he dedicated the merit of his efforts to future Buddhahood. Many of his students also took vows, hoping to become disciples of that future Buddha.

Upon disrobing and ascending the throne after his brother’s death in 1851, Rama IV was in a position to impose his reforms on the rest of the Thai Sangha, but chose not to. Instead, he quietly sponsored the building of new Dhammayut centers in the capital and the provinces, which was how — by the time of Ajarn Mun — there came to be a handful of Dhammayut monasteries in Ubon.
Ajarn Mun felt that Customary Buddhism had little to offer and so he joined the Dhammayut order, taking a student of Prince Mongkut as his preceptor. Unlike many who joined the order at the time, he wasn’t interested in the social advancement that would come with academic study and ecclesiastical appointments. Instead, his life on the farm had impressed on him the sufferings inherent in the cycle of life and death, and his single aim was to find a way out of the cycle. As a result, he soon left the scholarly environment of his preceptor’s temple and went to live with a teacher named Ajarn Sao Kantasilo (1861-1941) in a small meditation monastery on the outskirts of town.

Ajarn Sao was unusual in the Dhammayut order in that he had no scholarly interests but was devoted to the practice of meditation. He trained Ajarn Mun in strict discipline and canonical meditation practices, set in the context of the dangers and solitude of the wilderness. He could not guarantee that this practice would lead to the noble attainments, but he believed that it headed in the right direction.
After wandering for several years with Ajarn Sao, Ajarn Mun set off on his own in search of a teacher who could show him for sure the way to the noble attainments. His search took nearly two decades and involved countless hardships as he trekked through the jungles of Laos, central Thailand, and Burma, but he never found the teach
er he sought.

Gradually he realized that he would have to follow the Buddha’s example and take the wilderness itself as his teacher, not simply to conform to the ways of nature — for nature is samsara itself — but to break through to truths transcending them entirely. If he wanted to find the way beyond aging, illness, and death, he would have to learn the lessons of an environment where aging, illness, and death are thrown into sharp relief. At the same time, his encounters with other monks in the forest convinced him that learning the lessons of the wilderness involved more than just mastering the skills of physical survival.

 

He would also have to develop the acuity not to be misled by dead-end sidetracks in his meditation. So, with a strong sense of the immensity of his task, he returned to a mountainous region in central Thailand and settled alone in a cave.
In the long course of his wilderness training, Ajarn Mun learned that — contrary to Reform and Customary beliefs — the path to nirvana was not closed. The true Dhamma was to be found not in old customs or texts but in the well-trained heart and mind. The texts were pointers for training, nothing more or less. The rules of the Vinaya, instead of simply being external customs, played an important role in physical and mental survival. As for the Dhamma texts, practice was not just a matter of confirming what they said. Reading and thinking about the texts could not give an adequate understanding of what they meant — and did not count as showing them true respect. True respect for the texts meant taking them as a challenge: putting their teachings seriously to the test to see if, in fact, they are true. In the course of testing the teachings, the mind would come to many unexpected realizations that were not contained in the texts. These in turn had to be put to the test as well, so that one learned gradually by trial and error to the point of an actual noble attainment. Only then, Ajarn Mun would say, did one understand the Dhamma.

 

This attitude toward the Dhamma parallels what ancient cultures called “warrior knowledge” — the knowledge that comes from developing skills in difficult situations — as opposed to the “scribe knowledge” that people sitting in relative security and ease can write down in words. Of course, warriors need to use words in their training, but they view a text as authoritative only if its teachings are borne out in practice. The Canon itself encourages this attitude when it quotes the Buddha as teaching his aunt, “As for the teachings of which you may know, ‘These teachings lead to dispassion, not to passion; to being unfettered, not to being fettered; to divesting, not to accumulating; to modesty, not to self-aggrandizement; to contentment, not to discontent; to seclusion, not to entanglement; to aroused persistence, not to laziness; to being unburdensome, not to being burdensome’: You may definitely hold, ‘This is the Dhamma, this is the Vinaya, this is the Teacher’s instruction.'”
Thus the ultimate authority in judging a teaching is not whether the teaching can be found in a text. It lies in each person’s relentless honesty in putting the Dhamma to the test and carefully monitoring the results.
When Ajarn Mun had reached the point where he could guarantee that the path to the noble attainments was still open, he returned to the northeast to inform Ajarn Sao and then to continue wandering.

 

Gradually he began to attract a grassroots following. People who met him were impressed by his demeanor and teachings, which were unlike those of any other monks they had known. They believed that he embodied the Dhamma and Vinaya in everything he did and said. As a teacher, he took a warrior’s approach to training his students. Instead of simply imparting verbal knowledge, he put them into situations where they would have to develop the qualities of mind and character needed in surviving the battle with their own defilements. Instead of teaching a single meditation technique, he taught them a full panoply of skills — as one student said, “Everything from washing spittoons on up” — and then sent them into the wilds.
It was after Ajarn Mun’s return to the northeast that a third type of Buddhism emanating from Bangkok — State Buddhism — began to impinge on his life. In an effort to present a united front in the face of imperialist threats from Britain and France, Rama V (1868-1910) wanted to move the country from a loose feudal system to a centralized nation-state. As part of his program, he and his brothers — one of whom was ordained as a monk — enacted religious reforms to prevent the encroachment of Christian missionaries. Having received their education from British tutors, they created a new monastic curriculum that subjected the Dhamma and Vinaya to Victorian notions of reason and utility.

 

Their new version of the Vinaya, for instance, was a compromise between Customary and Reform Buddhism designed to counter Christian attacks that monks were unreliable and lazy. Monks were instructed to give up their wanderings, settle in established monasteries, and accept the new state curriculum. Because the Dhammayut monks were the best educated in Thailand at the time — and had the closest connections to the royal family — they were enlisted to do advance work for the government in outlying regions.
In 1928, a Dhammayut authority unsympathetic to meditation and forest wanderers took charge of religious affairs in the northeast. Trying to domesticate Ajarn Mun’s following, he ordered them to establish monasteries and help propagate the government’s program. Ajarn Mun and a handful of his students left for the north, where they were still free to roam. In the early 1930’s, Ajarn Mun was appointed the abbot of an important monastery in the city of Chieng Mai, but fled the place before dawn of the following day.

He returned to settle in the northeast only in the very last years of his life, after the local ecclesiastical authorities had grown more favorably disposed to his way of practice. He maintained many of his dhutanga practices up to his death in 1949.
It wasn’t until the 1950’s that the movement he founded gained acceptance in Bangkok, and only in the 1970’s did it come into prominence on a nationwide level. This coincided with a widespread loss of confidence in state monks, many of whom were little more than bureaucrats in robes. As a result, Kammatthana monks came to represent, in the eyes of many monastics and lay people, a solid and reliable expression of the Dhamma in a world of fast and furious modernization.
Buddhist history has shown that wilderness traditions go through a very quick life cycle.

 

As one loses its momentum, another often grows up in its place. But with the wholesale destruction of Thailand’s forests in the last few decades, the Kammatthana tradition may be the last great forest tradition that Thailand will produce. Fortunately, we in the West have learned of it in time to gather lessons that will be help in cultivating the customs of the noble ones on Western soil and establishing authentic wilderness traditions of our own.
Perhaps the most important of those lessons concerns the role that the wilderness plays in testing and correcting trends that develop among Buddhists in cities and towns. The story of the Kammatthana tradition gives lie to the facile notion that Buddhism has survived simply by adapting to its host culture. The survival of Buddhism and the survival of the Dhamma are two different things. People like Ajarn Mun — willing to make whatever sacrifices are needed to discover and practice the Dhamma on its own terms — are the ones who have kept the Dhamma alive.

Of course, people have always been free to engage in Buddhist traditions in whatever way they like, but those who have benefited most from that engagement are those who, instead of reshaping Buddhism to fit their preferences, reshape themselves to fit in with the customs and traditions of the noble ones. To find these customs isn’t easy, given the bewildering variety of traditions that Buddhists have spawned over the centuries. To test them, each individual is thrown back on his or her own powers of relentless honesty, integrity, and discernment.

There are no easy guarantees. And perhaps this fact in itself is a measure of the Dhamma’s true worth. Only people of real integrity can truly comprehend it. As Ajarn Lee, one of Ajarn Mun’s students, once said, “If a person isn’t true to the Buddha’s teachings, the Buddha’s teachings won’t be true to that person — and that person won’t be able to know what the Buddha’s true teachings are”.

Source; The Customs of the Noble Ones”, by Thanissaro Bhikkhu. Access to Insight (Legacy Edition), 7 June 2010, http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/authors/thaniss… ©1999 Thanissaro Bhikkhu


Takrut Thak Chueak Gliaw Diaw Luang Por Sud Wat Ga Long (12)

Mid Era Takrut Klaew Klaad Kong Grapan Thak Chueak Gliaw 5 Inches A highly Revered Kong Grapan Klaew Klaad Maha Ud, top ‘Krueang Rang’ (Talisman) type amulet with Power of Protection; the Takrut Tone Nuea Tong Daeng Thak Chueak Gliaw Diaw Sacred Copper Yantra Foil Spell with single spiral bound cord wrap, from the great Luang Por Sud, of Wat Ka Long. The Takrut measures about 5 inches long. Estimated Circa 2490 BE.

 

Luang Por Sud was the legendary originator of the Wicha Yant Daktor rattan wicker ball Yantra spell, and also very famous for his Pra Somdej Khee Suea Buddha riding tiger sacred powder votive tablets. The amulets of Luang Por Sud were revered by the great ‘invincible’ gangsters of that Era, and the Somdej Sariga Suea Phaen was a favorite amulet with famous Gangsters of the time, such as Dtee Yai’. His amulets are prized possessions of those who seek Kong Grapan Klaew Klaad Invincibility and Evasion magic, as well as those who seek power and dominion over others, in professional and social status affairs.

 

Free Registered Air Parcel Shipping is Included with this amulet. The Takrut is made from Nuea Tong Daeng Sacred Copper Yantra foil, and bound with spellbound cords (using incantations whilst wrapping), as was traditional. This exhibit is estimated to have been made during the mid-era of his Wicha trajectory. The Takrut was known to have been made with yellow, beige, white, black or Green Cord.


Luang Por Sud was born in the year 2445 BE on the 7th of May. he ordained into the Sangha at the age of 16 as a Samanera Novice Monk. When he moved after becoming a fully fledged Bhikkhu to Samut Sakorn and stayed at Wat Ka Long, where he eventually became the Abbot through his long term diligence and meritorious acts.

He became famous for his Wicha Yant Look Takror Wicker ball Yantra, which he had Mastered through the use of Khmer Sorcery methods. Luang Por Sud made many different kinds of amulets, but it is perhaps the Takrut, and his Look Takror Wicha amulets (including the Pha Yant Takror) which are his most revered and famous for their Kong Grapan Chadtri and Klaew Klaad powers.

 

Luang Por Sud became even more famous after his death in the year of his cremation in 2545 BE, when his body would not burn, and seemed impermeable to fire. So the temple committee was forced to give up trying to cremate him, and placed his remains in a glass coffinThe Takrut contains a vast compendium of blessings, ranging from protection to wealthy fortunes, with strong leanings towards Klaew Klaad and Kong Grapan Chadtri beng the most prominent form of magic present. Luang Por Sud made Takrut throughout his lifetime as a Sorceror Monk.

Luang Por Sud, and his Amulets, and His famous Yant Takror and Takror Balls are amongst the Popular ‘Niyom’ Class of Preferred Guru Masters, of a High Class but with a still affordable pricetag, despite their ever increasing rarity and difficulty to encounter when seeking an item from this Master.

The Takrut of Luang Por Sud is said to have been the favor of the Great Highwaymen and Robbers, who used the Takrut, Pha Yant, and Look Hwaay Takror of this great Master to Protect themselves.

 

The famous Look Takror Wicker Ball of Luang Por Sud is the subject of a Legendary story that is said to have helped a Thief Escape hundreds of Police, as he was surrounded, and slip through their hands with the power of the Magic Amulet assisting.

 

This is a very rare item for the devotee collector of ‘Thai Krueang Rang’ (Buddhist, Occult, and Animist Charms), and is a matter of choice whether the owner wishes to preserve it in Museum Case or wear it for its Protective Powers. This Takrut belt is Please always Take Care with Authentic Sacred Ancient Amulets, and preserve their condition as best as possible, but also remember that amulets both Ancient and Modern, were designed and intended to be worn, more than they were intended to be kept in a Museum.

 

Below; Luang Por Sud (Wat Ka Long) 2445 – 2526 BE

Luang Por Sud of Wat Ka Long

Luang Por Sud was the continuation of and the disciple in Magic of the Great Luang Por Rung (Wat Ta Graber) and Luang Phu Mao (Wat Klang Panom Prai). A great mark of respect was given to Luang Por Sud by the great Luang Por Rung, who asked Luang Por Sud to come and assist in the empowerment of Luang Por Rung’s first edition Coin Amulet.

 

 

Luang Por Sud passed away on the 14th of August 2526 BE, and it was then that his already great fame became legendary around the country, as the miracle of his Cremation Ceremony occurred before the eyes of thousands of Devotees

 

The event fulfilled the Prophecy which had happened in the Dream of his first apprentice, Luang Por Chalong, where Luang Por Sud had appeared and told Luang Por Chalong that it would not be possible to light the Funeral Pyre, and that Luang Por Sud would do it himself, but that his bones would remain, for they could not be burned. This is a strange thing, because this kind of miracle also happened with the Arahant Saributra in the times of the Buddha, and it is said that the bones of Saributra cannnot be burned until the Future Buddha Maitreya comes, who shall burn them with Kasina Fire energy.

Below; The Famous Yant Takror Kong Grapan Chadtri Yantra of Luang Por Sud.

Yant Takror

The Famous Tiger Takrut of Luang Phu Bun. of Wat Klang Bang Gaew, in Nakorn Pathom.

The Immortally famous Takrut Hnaa Bpaag Suea Tiger Hide Forehead Hide Yantra Scroll Spell of Luang Phu Bun (Wat Klang Bang Gaew), hand inscribed and spellbound with Daay Dtra Sangkh Cords over 100 Years ago, and coated in Rak Chart Jeen Boran ancient Chinese red laquer, blackened over a century and more of ageing.

Free EMS Express Airmail Registered Shipping Worldwide is included with this amulet. A Master Class amulet from the great Master of Wicha Bia Gae, Wicha Pong Jindamanee, Wicha Takrut, and Wicha Suea, of Olden Days of the Nakorn Pathom Province; Luang Phu Bun, of Wat Klang Bang Gaew.

This exhibit is in extremely pristine condition, and shows the true qualities of ageing on its lacquered surface, to reveal an authentic model of the Takrut Hnaa Bpaag Suea tiger forehead amulet of Luang Phu Bun.

Tiger Takrut Luang Phu Bun

Luang Phu Bun released various styles of Tiger forehead Takrut (as well as other types of Takrut too), but this form is the most highly accepted and easily recognizable, and highly preferred for its extremely well reputed Kong Grapan, Maha Ud, Klaew Klaad, Metta and Maha Amnaj

 

 

A Centenarian Amulet of Immense Value for the Sacred Powerful Blessings of the Great LP Bun, its Historical Importance, and Rarity as an Ancient Amulet of Master-Class Status, as well as for being a masterpiece of antique magical heritage and Buddhist Historic importance, in a substance that is no longer to be found used in the making of modern amulets, due to the ban on ivory and tiger hide and teeth, which only permits antiques of ancient origins to continue to exist.

 

takrut types lp bun

The amulet is made from rolled up tiger forehead hide, and is inscribed with sacred spells with Wicha Suea Tiger Magick, which represents various aspects of Maha Amnaj Commanding Power, Invincibility, Chai Chana Victory Bringing Magic, Serm Yos Status Increase, Easy Living and Maha Pokasap Wealth Attraction. The tiger itself, especially when made from real Tiger Forehead, is naturally imbued with the Sorcerous Powers of Maha Amnaj (commanding power and influence), Serm Yos Status Increase for positions of command, Chai Chana Victory, and great opportunities of promotion, Metta Mahaniyom Mercy Charm is also present, to lull your Subjects and Charm them into Obedience.

 

 

This is an extremely Rare Ancient Amulet of the Pra Niyom Master-Class of Thai Buddhist Amulets. Luang Phu Bun is one of the Top Master Guru Monks of Thai Buddhist History in both Patipata (Dhamma Practice) as well as for his Magical Prowess in Amulet making, Puttasart, and Saiyasart (Occult Sorcery and Buddha Magic). The amulets of Luang Phu Bun are famous for their immense Klaew Klaad and Metta Mahaniyom Powers and their Power of ‘Serm Duang’ (improve fate and destiny).

Takrut LP Bun Wat Klang Bang Gaew

 

His amulets grace the pages of almost every famous catalog and amulet magazine in the High End Collector Publications, and are amongst the highest priced ranging from many hundreds of dollars for the most commonly found amulets, to hundreds of thousands of dollars for his rarest amulets.

 

Luang Phu Bun was a close friend and accomplice in Wicha with the Great Somdej Pra Sangkarach (Pae) of Wat Sutat fame, whose amulets belong to the priceless treasures category and are only to be found in the possession of wealthy, and high ranking persons of state importance, and a few lucky extreme collectors and devotees who have kept them throughout the generations, or inherited them as heirlooms from their family members. Almost anybody who owns such an amulet will be hard pressed to part with it in any circumstances.

Takrut Hnaa Bpaag Suea LP Bun

 

Below; The Takrut Hide is wrapped with Daay Dtra Sangkh thin cord and lacquered, as was ubiquitous in the olden days, where encasement was not yet an industry/profession, with devotees instead, wearing the amulet against the skin. The amulet can be encased in Waterproof Transparent Acrylic Casing, Steel Capped, or Gold Capped Transparent Tube Casing, or can be strapped to a waist cord if you prefer to wear the amulet touching your skin.

 

Luang Phu Bun was extremely famed for his Wicha of making Ya Wasana Jinda Manee. This Wicha was developed by Luang Phu from an Ancient Teaching through his Kroo Ba Ajarn, and has since his making the Muan Sarn famously powerful, has been inherited as a Wicha of Muan Sarn powder making for the amulets of the Wat Klang Bang Gaew lineage throughout the ages from Luang Phu Bun, to Luang Por Perm, to Pra Ajarn Bai, to Luang Phu Juea, and now the present holder of Luang Phu’s now ancient Wicha, Luang Por Kong (Sanya) at Wat Klang Bang Gaew.

The Bia Gae of Luang Phu Bun is considered the most famous and difficult to find of all Bia Gae that are of Master Class status. All following Masters of Luang Phu Bun’s temple have become famous Bia Gae Masters, and continue to rise in procession in line and following after those now immensely unaffordable Bia Gae from Luang Phu Bun. The famous Pong Ya Wasana Jinda Manee, and Pong Khamin Sek Muan Sarn Powders of Luang Phu Bun (also known as ‘Pra Ya Horm’), carry legendary status for their immensely powerful magical properties. These are two very Sacred Powders within the Dtamra, with Pong Khamin Sek having a pungent aroma, with Powers of Protection and Wealth Increase, and the legendary Pong Ya Wasana Jinda Manee having an aromatic Sacred Powder, which uses of course the famous ‘Ya Wasana (‘Wasana’ meaning Lucky Fortunes).

Tiger Takrut LP Bun

Pong Ya Wasana, and Pong Khamin Sek are the most famous Muan Sarn powders of Luang Phu Bun, and have become his Legendary ‘Dtamra’ (Traditonal Legend of Inheritance Wicha). For the sake of lineage magic preservation, and continued equal respect to all following lineage masters of Wat Klang Bang Gaew, It must be noted, that despite the fame of his world famous predecessors at Wat Klang Bang Gaew, LP Bun, LP Perm, Ajarn Bai, and Lp Juea, the present Wicha Holder LP Kong Sanya of Wat Klang Bang Gaew, now holds a Wicha that has been passed through a long lineage of already Great and Famous Guru Masters. All Masters inherited this Wicha from the Great Kroo Ba Ajarn Luang Phu Bun, and who have all passed away in sequence after their long lives and trajectory.

 

We are thus gazing avidly at an amulet of a True Olden Days Master, who is already 4 -5 generations the predecessor of the current Wicha holder and Sentinel of the Wicha, making his amulets truly worthy of the title ‘Ancient Amulet’.

Kata Suea – Invocation of Tiger Spirit (Chnanting Tutorial)

 

Below; Luang Phu Bun, of Wat Klang Bang Gaew, and his Tiger Takrut.

The Famous Tiger Takrut of Luang Phu Bun. of Wat Klang Bang Gaew, in Nakorn Pathom.

 

 

Presenting a close up look at a pristinely well preserved and rare Pra Khun Phaen Pong Prai Kumarn, with 6 code stamps on front face, and Pra Somdej indent on rear face, with bronze wanich and sai rae tong kam golden coating. This is a master class Khun Phaen of LP Tim, which won first prize trophy during the August 2561 BE LP Tim amulet competition of the Samakom Luead Ban Kaay Luang Phu Tim amulet association.

Pra Khun Phaen Pong Prai Kumarn Luang Por Tim

This Model is  Pra Khun Phaen pok Pim Niyom Sao Mee Sen, in Pink Prai Kumarn Powders with Sai rae Tong Kam golde  coating, 6 code stamps on front face, amd Pra Somdej coin impression indented into rear face.  this Amulet won first prize trophy during the highly esteemed Amulet competition of the Luead Ban Kaay Lp Tim Amulets association, for its impressive beauty and originality, in the category of Pra Khun Phaen with coin impressions in rear face.

Luang Phu Tim Issarigo, was of course not only one of the most highly acclaimed and sought after Guru Monks for his amulets in his lifetime, amd posthumously, but is also the holder of the highest esteem in Thai Buddhist amulet history for Pong Prai Kumarn powders. Luang Phu Tim, is Internationally Acclaimed, for his famous Pra Khun Phaen Pong Prai Kumarn, and Look Om powder balls. As to the classic ‘Rian’ type coin image amulets which have become all time favourites, and eternally, world famous classic amulets of the high end variety. His rian Jaroen Porn, and Rian Nakprok Paed Rorp are amongst the most highly sought after coin amulets of all.


An exquisitely beautiful Pra Khun Phaen Prai Kumarn 2515 BE Pim Yai Niyom Block Tong Hlueang (Block 2) Hlang Dtok Dtaeng Niyom Nuea Chompoo with Khaw Hniaw Suk & Pong Prai Kumarn Ta Bronze Wanich Dtem Ongk, code Sala (crown code stamp), code 3, and quadruple code Pidta embossed on the front face, with the indented image of a Rian Pra Somdej Lor LP Tim embossed into the rear face as an indentation.


Rian Glom Lek 2505 BE Por Tan Klai Wajasit (2)

Presenting a tiny but powerful and rare classic amulet from one of the Great Khao Or Masters of the 20th Century, Rian Glom Lek Hlang Chedi 2505 BE Nuea Tong Daeng Miniature Guru Monk Coin Por Tan Klai Wajasit

This Sacred amulet of the Great Khao Or Master of Nakorn Sri Tammarat, Master of Wat San Khan and Wat Pratat Noi, is a very rare amulet from Por Tan Klai’s 2505 BE Blessing Ceremony Edition, and is considered a ‘Jaek mae Krua’ type amulet (meaning ‘give to the kitchen maids and temple helpers’), which is suitable not only for men, but due to its miniature size, a perfect amulet for ladies or children to wear.

Rian Glom Lek 2505 BE Por Tan Klai Wajasit

Rian Glom Lek 2505 BE Por Tan Klai Wajasit Wat Suan Khan

The 2505 BE edition of amulets of Por Tan Klai, is a highly preferred edition, which saw his famous ‘Rian Glom’ round Monk coin amulet with Chakra released, The Rian Glom Lek Hlang Chedi, and the Roop Tai Por Tan Klai Guru Monk Blesséd Photographamulets such as look om chan hmak and ya sen tobacco balls, and sacred powder amulets of various models.


A very rare and highly prized amulet for the devotees of Por Tan Klai to associate with his image and pray to him with a blessed image of the Guru, and the Chedi Relic Stupa on rear face for Buddhanussati and Marananussati. A powerful and Sacred amulet which has passed through the hands of the Guru and been blessed by him.

Por Tan Klai was one of the Top Guru Master Monks of the Last Century, and is considered one of the Four Great Masters of the Previous Generation of Lineage Masters of the Khao Or Southern Sorcery Lineage.

Kata Bucha Por Tan Klai

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Prakam 108 Met Nuea Mai Saksit Dtid Rian Kroo Ba Gaew 2520 BE – a Sacred wooden bead Blessėd Rosary with Guru Monk coin, from the great Lanna Monk, Kroo Ba Gaew Sutto, of Wat Doi Mokkhala, in Chiang Mai. Serm Duang (Good Karma) Maha Mongkol (Auspicious Blessings), Klaew Klaad (Evade Dangers), Maha Lap (Lucky Fortunes)

The rosary has a 2520 BE Rian Roop Muean Guru Monk Coin with the image of Kroo Ba Gaew gazing sideways on the front face, and a Sacred Nam Tao Yantra with Khom Agkhara on the rear face. A highly recommendable item for Buddhanussati and Gurunussati, Meditation, Prayer Counting, Protection and Mercy Charm. Wear as a necklace with amulet of the Guru. and use for counting your prayers and Kata Chants.

Luang Phu Kroo Ba Gaew was trained in his early ordination under the lineage of Luang Phu Mun Puritatto, and is one of the great Kroo Ba Ajarn of the Northern Lanna Region, who was a very close companion of the Great Luang Phu Hwaen Sujjino, of Wat Doi Mae Pang.

 

Luang Phu Kroo Ba Gaew has somewhat of a mysterious past, because his biography was never officially documented, and Kroo Ba Gaew himself was not prone to talk about himself very much. This of course common with High Arya Sangha who have practiced and attained inner peace, and is in itself a sign of great attainments. Sadly however, this results in little being known about his early life as a monk in the lineage of Luang Phu Mun, leaving us with only a partial knowledge of his Biography.

 

But the miracles of this Great Monk have been told and retold over many decades, and by word of mouth, Kroo Ba Gaew became a Great Kroo Ba Ajarn of the region, on the merits of Miracles made. It is said, that once during the time Kroo Ba Gaew was still living, a Naga Serpent came up from the underworld near the temple, and was run over by a truck as it slithered across the road, and was hurt. The Naga crawled up to the temple and called Luang Phu Kroo Ba Gaew to come out and heal him with holy water.

Another famous legend is the tale of the three Buddha images in the Mae Nam Ping river, which were embedded in the stream. Luang Phu Kroo Ba Gaew performed a ceremony to invite them to rise up from the waters to perform miracles for humanity, and come to reside at the temple.

 

The statues rose up from the depths and were able to be transported to the temple, where they reside to this day. It is said these Buddhas can make the rain fall in the proper season to make the crops grow, which is a matter of life and death from many farming communities in the region. The Buddhas are hence extremely sacred for the local devotees, and Kroo Ba Gaew’s miracle of calling them, is perhaps his most famous legend.

 

Luang Phu Kroo Ba Gaew’s amulets are extremely rare, because he never ever really focused on making amulets of many kinds. he would only release mainly Buddhist amulets such as his monk coins, and ‘Roop Tai’ blessėd monk photos, and items of reverence and practice such as the Prakam Saksit Blessėd Rosary. Devotees of Kroo Ba Gaew like to wear his rosaries with one of his coin amulets attached for prayer and protection of the Guru. HIs devotees are very reluctant to part with their amulets of Luang Phu Kroo Ba Gaew, for they believe them to possess very powerful protection, and bring auspicious blessings.

 

The Wongarn Pra Krueang Lanna Northern Amulet Appreciation Society have registered the pantheon of amulets of Kroo Ba Gaew as residing within the Dtamrap Pra Krueang Lanna Yord Niyom ‘Top List of Most Preferred Amulets of the Lanna Region’.

Use the Traditional Thai Buddhist Method for Bucha;

1. Chant Maha Namasakara (3 Times)

2. Chant the Trai Soranakom (3 Times)

3. Chant Kata Aaraatanaa Pra Krueang (3 Times)

Kata Maha Namasakara

Namo Dtat-Sa Pakawa-Dto Araha-Dto Sam-Maa Sam-Put-Dtat-Sa

Namo Dtat-Sa Pakawa-Dto Araha-Dto Sam-Maa Sam-Put-Dtat-Sa

Namo Dtat-Sa Pakawa-Dto Araha-Dto Sam-Maa Sam-Put-Dtat-Sa

 

Trai Soranakom

Puttang Cheewidtang Yaawa Nipaanang Saranang Kajchaami

Tammang Cheewidtang Yaawa Nipaanang Saranang Kajchaami

Sangkang Cheewidtang Yaawa Nipaanang Saranang Kajchaami

Tudtiyambpi Puttang Cheewidtang Yaawa Nipaanang Saranang Kajchaami

Tudtiyambpi Tammang Cheewidtang Yaawa Nipaanang Saranang Kajchaami

Tudtiyambpi Sangkang Cheewidtang Yaawa Nipaanang Saranang Kajchaami

Dtadtiyambpi Puttang Cheewidtang Yaawa Nipaanang Saranang Kajchaami

Dtadtiyambpi Tammang Cheewidtang Yaawa Nipaanang Saranang Kajchaami

Dtadtiyambpi Sangkang Cheewidtang Yaawa Nipaanang Saranang Kajchaami

 

Kata Aaraatana Pra Krueang

Puttang Aaraatanaanang

Tammang Aaraatanaanang

Sangkang Aaraatanaanang

Puttang Prasittimae

Tammang Prasittimae

Sangkang Prasittimae

 

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Pra Somdej Bang Khun Prohm Pim Sen Daay Kru Gao 3rd Prizewinner Ancient BenjapakeeAmulet (38)

A 3rd Prize winning Competition Standard Master-Class amulet of the Benjapakee Immortal Classic Family, the Pra Somdej Wat Bang Khun Prohm Kru Gao (Chedi Yai), Pim Sen Daay Kru Gao. An Immortal Classic and one of the most famous Thai Buddhist Amulets of all time, as well as being amongst the top preferred amulets of the serious devotee and wealthy collector of the accepted amulets of Somdej Pra Puttajarn (Dto) Prohmrangsri, of Wat Rakang Kositaram.

Pra Somdej Bang Khun Prohm Pim Sen Daay Kru Gao 3rd Prizewinner Ancient Benjapakee Amulet - Somdej Pra Puttajarn (Dto) Prohmrangsri of Wat Rakang.

Pra Somdej Bang Khun Prohm Pim Sen Daay Kru Gao 3rd Prizewinner Ancient Benjapakee Amulet – Somdej Pra Puttajarn (Dto) Prohmrangsri of Wat Rakang.

The Pra Somdej of Somdej Dto are the number one amulets of all time, be they from Wat Rakang, Wat Bang Khun Prohm,or Wat Gaes Chaiyo. Made in the period between 2411 and 2413 BE, three years before the passing of Somdej Dto himself, and buried in the Stupa until their distribution in 2500 BE

Rear face view of Pra Somdej Bang Khun Prohm Pim Sen Daay Kru Gao 3rd Prizewinner

Rear face view of Pra Somdej Bang Khun Prohm Pim Sen Daay Kru Gao 3rd Prizewinner

This amulet comes with its third prize winning certificate micro-chipped certificate card of the Chomrom Pra Tae Mueang Siam Amulet Appreciation society and complimentary box with third prize ribbon sticker. We offer free Gold, Waterproof or Solid Silver Casing with this amulet. whichever you prefer. Free EMS Shipping is also included in the price

The rear face shows the presence of all the classic features and muan sarn ingredients of a true Pra Somdej Bang Khun Prohm of Somdej Dto, with Kraap Kru on the front face revealing it to have been placed within the larger Chedi Stupa of the 2500 BE Opening. The Kru Gao (Chedi Yai) amulets are more highly preferred than the Kru Hmai (small Chedis) amulets, which were found later within the nine smaller Chedi Stupas surrounding the main central Stupa.

Pra Somdej Bang Khun Prohm is one of the classic Pra Somdej amulets available and is along with Pra Somdej Wat Gaes Chaiyo perhaps the next in line to the Pra Somdej Wat Rakang amulet as far as popularity, beauty, sacredness of Puttapisek ceremony and price range.

 

 

Pra Somdej Bang Khun Prohm Kru Pra Chedi Yai (Large Chedi Kru amulets)
The Pra Somdej Bang Khun Prohm amulets classified as a Kru Pra Chedi Yai, have 9 different Pim Song, and were made in the period between 2411 and 2413 BE. Not all of the Pra Somdej Bang Khun Prohm were placed in the Kru, it took many years to create and press them and many would be in a receptacle in the Kuti and would be handed out by him during the time he created and empowered them.

 

This explains the absence of Kraap Kru in some exhibits, as well as being purely logical and the most probable chain of events to have occurred. The Thaan Saem is one of the 5 Pim Song of Pra Somdej, which exist in both the Kru Wat Rakang and Kru Bang Khun Prohm amulets. Pra Somdej Wat Rakang have Five major category of Pim Song, whereas the Pra Somdej has four more Pim Song, making it nine major Pim in all.

 

 

These 9 Pim are; Pim Yai, Pim Sangkati, Pim Song Chedi, Pim Prok Po, Pim Gaes Bua Dtum, Pim Thaan Koo, Pim Sen Dai, Pim Ok Krut.

History records that, in the year of the Dragon 2411 BE, Samian Tra Duang Tongoses made restoration work Wat Bang Khun Prohm Nai (Wat Mai Amataros), and renewed the temple along with the building of a new Chedi Stupa, in order to place Pra Somdej amulets, which Samian Tra Duang invited Jao Prakhun Somdej Pra Puttajarn (Toh) Prohmrangsri, of Wat Rakang Kositaram to place there, as well as to empower. The amulets were made in the Pra Somdej Traditional formula of 84,000 pieces (same as the number of suttas of the Pra Tammakhant).

 

After Somdej Dto had blessed and empowered them, Samian Tra Duang was allowed to place then in the Kru hiding place within the Chedi Stupa behind the Upopsadha shrine room. During the time from then, the Chedi was sometimes accessed and amulets were removed from time to time, and even some thieves dug holes and stole some.

 

This became so bothersome that the Kru had to be broken open officially on 24th November in 2500 BE.

 

The opening took all day, until at approximately 8 pm, the very last Pra Somdej amulets were removed. Many of them were very thickly coated with ‘Kraap Kru’ (residues and growths). The amulets were allowed to be rented out by devotees, until the year 2509. The total amount of money raised from the rental of these amulets amounted to about 4 Million Thai Baht.

 

This money was used to construct the new Uposadha shrineroom, and the renovate and restore the old Chedi Stupa, as well as making a bronze statue of Tan Jao Prakhun Somdej Toh, which was completed and celebrated in 2509 at the same time as celebrating the building of the Putta Sima (temple walls), and the burial of the ‘Look Nimit’ (all Uposadha shrine rooms must have a Look Nimit ball buried under it).

Micro Chipped Certificate of 3rd Prize Pra Somdej Bang Khun Prohm Pim Sen Daay Kru Gao

Micro Chipped Certificate of 3rd Prize Pra Somdej Bang Khun Prohm Pim Sen Daay Kru Gao

The depletion of this series led to the creation of yet another immortal legend of the Pra Somdej Niche in 2509, namely the Pra Somdej Wat Bang Khun Prohm 09 Edition, which is in itself one of the most highly collected amulets of serious collectors and devotees, and also carry relatively elevated prices.

This Classic edition of Somdej Bang Khun Prohm, are considered to have extremely powerful Buddha magic in them due to the richness of sacred powders and powerful blessings contained within from great master Somdej Dto.

Carved Tooth Tiger Amulet LP Parn Wat Bang Hia (Wat Bang Bor)

Khiaw Gae Suea Jarn Mer Sacred Carved Tiger Amulet made from tooth, with hand inscription by the Great Luang Por Parn of Wat Klong Dan Previously ‘Wat Bang Hia’) – Kong Grapan Chadtri Maha Amnaj Talismanic Amulet of Master Class Status.

The amulet has a beautiful ochre Patina on the surface from aging through the many decades of time that have passed, and thorugh contact with the skin of devotees, and is a most pristine example of a suea Luang Por Parn.

Suea Gae Luang Por Parn Wat Bang Hia

Suea Gae Luang Por Parn Wat Bang Hia

Luang Por Parn is arguably the number one Master Gaeji Ajarn of all Living Memory when it comes to Wicha Khiaw Suea. Many Masters hold a high status for carved Khiaw Suea, but nobody in living memory has attained the same status as Luang Por Parn, except his famous apprentice, Luang Por Nok, of Wat Sangkasi.

 

Khiaw Suea are full of Maha Amnaj, Kong Grapan Chadtri and Metta Mahaniyom-Maha Sanaeh Magick, and possess Anti Black Magick Forces in their very nature. An excellent Status Increase Talisman to Impose your Superiority and Status and Rank over others, and to protect you from deadly Dangers and Weaponry, as well as to Increase Seductive Charm and Chances of Promotion.

The temple of Wat Kong Dan (Wat Bang Hia), is of course a World famous Historical Temple of Monumental Status in the Amulet Scene for the fact that this was the temple of Luang Por Parn, Master Wicha holder of making famous Tiger Tooth and Carved Tiger amulets, whose amulets are now of the ‘Maha Sethee’ Master Class, highly favored and collected by the wealthy collector, which has caused these amulets to become amongst the most expensive of their genre.

The tiger teeth of Luang Por Parn are perhaps the most sought after and rare of all Tiger Tooth amulets even more so than those of his predecessor Luang Por Ruean (also of Wat Bang Hia), especially those which are of the ‘Suea Kroeng’ tiger (large male tiger). Some circles of collectors may charge as much as 50,000$ for one, as can be seen in the below news article from the newspaper ‘Kom Chad Leuk’.

However, we wish to dispose of such exaggerated prices, which are indeed seen to be perpetuated, and certain marketplaces do continue to declare these prices, and get them from rich millionaires. But we do not pertain to such practices of price manipulation at such exaggerated levels, and maintain a realistic approach based on our ability to discover and obtain such items of authenticity at reasonable affordable prices.

Luang Por Parn – Wat bang Hia (Wat bang Bor)

Such prices are manipulated and highly exaggerated, despite their continued success in maintaining the myth of mega millionaire price tags. A tiger tooth from Luang Por Parn is indeed expensive, as are all tiger teeth from olden days masters, but not as expensive as such circles of aficionados like to insinuate.

Many people think that Luang Por Parn of Wat Klong Dan is a different Master to the Luang Por Parn of Wat bang Hia, but this is a Myth, that is perpetuated by people’s ignorance of the fact, that wat bang Hia, in Bang Bor, Samut Prakarn Province, is a different temple to the temple of Wat Klong Dan. The truth is however, that the word ‘Hia’ which means both ‘monitor lizard’ (which is the true reason for the temple being named Wat Bang Hia, due to a lot of Monitor Lizards being around in those days), also is a swear word, meaning ‘very bad person’. Because the name of the temple of Wat Bang Hia was seen as Inauspicous to some people’s ears, it was changed to ‘Wat Klong Dan’

This is why much confusion has occurred with those who have not studied the Dtamra of Luang Por Parn and related Masters of this Temple, may believe there are two Masters famous for Tiger Teeth both named Luang Por Parn, tow Masters famous for tiger teeth named Luang Por Say, for they are both sometimes stated to be of ‘Wat Bang Hia, and sometimes as coming from ‘Wat Klong Dan’

Luang Por Parn was one of the Great Master Guru Monks of his Era (2368 – 2543 BE), and the originator of the Wicha for Tiger Amulet empowerment of this Lineage, using the Wicha of Wat Bang Hia.

Size; 4 Cm Long x 1.5 Cm thick

Wat Bang Hia is of course a World famous Historical Temple of Monumental Status in the Amulet Scene for the fact that this was the temple of Luang Por Parn, Master Wicha holder of making famous Tiger Tooth and Carved Tiger amulets, whose amulets are now of the ‘Maha Sethee’ Millionaire master Class.

It was the Great Luang Por Parn who was the Mentor and Teacher in Wicha to Luang Por Nok of Wat Sangkasi, who is a Classic Olden Days Master of Legendary Status in his own right, and whose Tiger Teeth Talismans also carry immense Serm Baramee and Maha Amnaj Power.

Luang Por Nok practiced the Mastery of Wicha Saiyasart Buddha Sastra Occult magic under Luang Por Parn himself. He fast became Luang Por’s most elite apprentice for his fast wittedness, ease of learning and good memory.

Because of this he recieved the teachings and attained Mastery of the methods of Luang Por Parn in a very short space of time, and was soon considered to have a level of Mastery and Understanding that Thai people call ‘Dtaek Chan’, which means to Master a subject to the poin where one excels above all other practitioners.

Carved Tooth Tiger Amulet for Protection LP Parn

Luang Por Nok often followed Luang Por Parn out into the forest when he would wander on Tudong Practice. This is where Luang Por Parn revealed and taught the Master Wicha of the ‘Khiaw Suea’ Tiger tooth amulet. The Wicha of Luang Por Nok became so powerful, because he was receiving Wicha from perhaps the greatest Master in Living Memory for Tiger Tooth Talismans.

One can say that Khiaw Suea from Luang Por Parn and from his Apprentice, the Great Luang Por Nok, can be considered the top preferred Masters for this kind of Talismanic Charm. They are both immensely rare, and most often completely beyond availability. We pride ourself in our diligent quest to search far and wide to find the remaining exhibits around the country, to present them for your admiration and study, and to place some available to those who wish to possess one.

Luckily we are patient and vigilant, and try our best to seek both beautiful, sacred and authentic example that are also affordable. It can not happen very often, for good things are hard to find, and far and few between. The Powers of the Tiger Tooth are reputably said to possess Kong Grapan Chadtri, Klaew Klaad, and Maha Amnaj (commanding power and influence), as well as powerful Maha Sanaeh attraction power and Metta Mahaniyom Mercy Charm.

The hand inscription is inimitably inscribed in the handwriting of Luang Por Say, and hence easily recognizable for its style of Agkhara lettering, noticeabe for its ‘lightning flash’ like Agkhara inscription, which is ubiquitously present with tiger teeth of Luang Por Parn.

The tooth can be encased if desired in waterproof casing for attachment as a pendant. One could say that this exhibit is an extremely pristine and beautiful example of Khiaw Suea Kroeng, with most beautiful features, and highly visible inscription, revealing the authentic evidence of the hand of a preferred artisan of the great master Luang Por Parn

Kata Hua Jai Suea Maha Amnaj – Incantation for the Tiger of Commanding Dominion and Power.

Gur Ru Su Gu

The yellow patina which has developed through aging on the surface of the tooth, brings character and excellence to the amulet, revealing its evident age and distinguished status, adding to the Magick of Maha Amnaj Commanding Power, Dominion and Influence in its visual effect, which is Imposing in Itself at First Glimpse.

Incantation for Tiger and Rachasri Lion amulets from the Great Luang Por Guay of Wat Kositaram

Rian Luang Phu Hmun Ngern Ngern Tong

Rian Hmun Ngern Hmun Tong Prakam 18 Met Pim Niyom Lai Mai Mee Pod Block Hnaa Bow Lek Code Ma Nuea Tong Daeng Rom Dam Luang Phu Hmun Tidtasilō Special Limited Edition 2542 BE Edition Pra Niyom class amulet of the Great Luang Phu Hmun (Moon), with code ‘Ma’ stamp, in Bow Lek Block Hnaa Block press Preferred model. The front face of the coin features the image of Luang Phu Hmun Tidtasīlō in ‘Kreung Ongk’ Cameo Bust/Half Torso), with a Bow Ribbon underneath. The ‘Ma’ code stamp in Khom Agkhara is embossed into the face of the amulet to the side of Luang Phu’s right shoulder.

This Pim (model) is a Pim Niyom Lai Mai Mee Pod (no mole on the shoulder) preferred model, and is a Pim Bow Lek (small bow), which is defined and differentiated from the Pim Bow Yai, by the fact that the flares of the ribbon are smaller and do not touch the edges of the borders of the coin, as is the case in the Pim Bow Yai. The Block Prakam 19 Met Pim were pressed using the Block Hnaa (thick block press), whereas the Block Prakam 18 Met were pressed using both the Block Hnaa thick block press and the Block Bang thin block press.

Rian Luang Phu Hmun Ngern Ngern Tong Nuea Tong Daeng

 

The Rian Roop Muean Hmun Ngern Hmun Tong Luang Phu Hmun amulet, is one of the top Guru Monk Coins of the pantheon of this Great Master Monk, featured in encyclopaedic catalogues of his Pra Niyom (Preferred Class) amulets. The Rian Hmun Ngern Hmun Tong is a ‘Rian Glom‘ round style shape Guru Monk Coin amulet, measuring 3 Cm in Diameter. The amulet is in Nuea Tong Daeng Rom Dam. The rear face bears a treasure sack with the words ‘Hmun Ngern Hmun Tong 999 Larn’ meaning ‘multiply silver and gold to become 999 millions’

The Rian Hmun Ngern Hmun Tong of Luang Phu Hmun was made in various Design Block Presses, and in thicker and thinner version Block Presses. Firstly we should list the Rian Hmun Ngern Hmun Tong Prakam 19 Met (nineteen rosary beads visible on the monk’s robe), and the Rian Hmun Ngern Hmun Tong Prakam 18 Met (eighteen rosary beads on the monk’s robe).

Luang Phu Hmun Wat Ban Jan

The Rian Hmun Ngern Hmun Tong Block Hnaa 18 Met is a top preferred amulet of Luang Phu Hmun Tidtasīlō, which was blessed in the Pra Kring Jaroen Lap Edition Blessing Ceremony, and which gained great fame due to a multitude of reports of miraculous successes and life saving miracles from devotees who wore the amulet, making it one of the great popular amulets of all time of Luang Phu Hmun, for miraculous powers.

This series of amulets were placed for blessing in the same Buddha Abhiseka Ceremony held for the ‘Jaroen Lap’ edition, with not only Luang Phu Hmun present to perform empowerment and blessings, but also a number of other Great Master Monks.

The Piti Tae Tong Casting was performed on the 30th October 2542 BE, The Buddha Abhiseka Blessing for the amulets was performed on the 31st October in the year 2542 BE at Wat Ban Jan with Meditative Empowerment.

Below; 18 rosary beads visible make this Pim a Pim prakam 18 Met model

Rian Luang Phu Hmun Ngern Ngern Tong Prakam 18 Met

Close Up detail of the 18 Rosary beads of the Rian Luang Phu Hmun Ngern Ngern Tong Pim Prakam 18 Met Lai Mai Mee Pod Niyom Preferred master Class Amulet

The Edition included the following amulets;

Roop Lor Loi Ongk Tong Hlueang Rom Dam – Loi Ongk Statuette in Sacred Brass with blackened finish

Pra Pong Roop Muean Nang Dtang – Muan Sarn Sacred Powders amulet

Pra Pong Pid Ta – Muan Sarn Sacred Powders amulet

Rian Hmun Ngern Hmun Tong Guru Monk Coin (Made in Nuea Ngern and Nuea Tong Daeng/Tong Daeng Rom Dam Prakam 19 Met, with a very few made attached to 7 coloured cord with Takrut, and in Nuea Tong daeng/Tong Daeng Rom Dam 18 Met). Very few solid gold coins were made to order, with 500 coins madse in Nuea Ngern (silver), and 10,000 coins were made in Nuea Tong Daeng (plus a few extra made for attachment to 7 coloured cord with Takrut which were not counted).

Thung Pokasap Jaroen Lap 999 Larn Treasure Purse

Pra Somdej Hlang Yant Hmeuk Run Raek – First edition Somdej Muan Sarn Sacred Powders amulet with ink stamp on rear face

Rian Arm Narai Song Krut Guru Monk Shield Coin amulet with Vishnu Avatar Riding Garuda Bird on rear face. Of a total of 10,000 amulets pressed and cast, 2000 of them were given the special code ‘Ma’ limited edition stamp for special release after a second blessing ceremony at Wat Nong Lom. 7500 Coins were given the code ‘Na’ stamp and released at Wat Sutat temple, and a further 500 coins were not given any code stamp at all (for release directly at Wat Ban Jan).

Below; news article about the Jaroen Lap edition (105 years Luang Phu Hmun), with the Rian Narai Song Krut visibly included.

Below; Cover of Encyclopaedic Catalog of the Amulets of Luang Phu Hmun, and below it, the inclusion of various Pim of the his amazing Amulets gracing its pages, including the Rian Hmun Ngern Hmun Tong, and the Rian Arm Hlang Narai.

Rian Hmun Ngern Hmun Tong 18 Met Luang Phu Hmun Nuea Tong Daeng

Rian Hmun Ngern Hmun Tong 18 Met Luang Phu Hmun Nuea Tong Daeng

Rian Hmun Ngern Hmun Tong 19 Met Luang Phu Hmun Nuea Tong Daeng

Luang Phu Hmun was a Maha Thaera Guru Monk of great age and who recieved Great reverence and Respect from the people of Tambon Jan for his Diligence and Purity in practicing the Vinaya as a Buddhist Monk. His predictions and instructions for ceremonial empowerment of amulets after his physical death, have been followed to the letter since his passing, for he gave special instructions to inform as to when and how he would return with his spiritual presence to empower amulets posthumously.

His Miracle Powers are Legendary, with so many stories of Miraculous events related to this Monk, who has seen the Reign of Five Kings in his Lifetime. Luang Phu Hmun’s amulets are now very hard to come across.

Below; Jaroen Lap Amulets of Luang Phu Hmun in the news

His amulets are becoming very rare, and prices have risen constantly since his passing, snapped up by the inner circle of devotees and collectors, who know about the attainments of this Monk, and that there are severe reasons to believe that he may have been an Arahant. His amulets are eminent members in the annals of the Classics.

Kam Ārātanā Buchā Luang Phu Hmun Tidtasīlō

Namō Dtassa Pakawadtō Arahadtō Sammā Samputtassa Namō Dtassa Pakawadtō Arahadtō Sammā Samputtassa Namō Dtassa Pakawadtō Arahadtō Sammā Samputtassa

Luang Phu Hmun Tidtasīlō Ma A U Luang Phu Hmun Tidtasīlō U A Ma

Kata Bucha Luang Phu Hmun

Dtua Gū Lūk Pra Putta Ongk Krū Sit Tudong Ong Āj Mai Bpramāt Krū Pob Roi Gom Dū Jer Krū Grāb Hwai

The word ‘Hmun’ means to turn and increase (revolve). Luang Phu Hmun always foretold that those who Bucha his amulets, would turn their luck and fortunes around, and increase their Business Success. He also foretold that those who Bucha his amulets will be protected from ‘Dtaay Hoeng (premature deadly accidents), and that the Devas will Protect the wearer of his amulets.



Rian Hmun Ngern Hmun Tong Wat Ban Jan 2560 BE

Rian Hmun Ngern Hmun Tong Wat Ban Jan 2560 BE

Luang Phu Hmun is renowned for having stated some Mysterious things;

Dtua Gū Bpen 1 Bor Bpen 2 Nai Phaen Din Nī (there is only one of me in this land)

Dtua Gū Bpen Hlek (i am made of iron)

Dtab Gū Bpen Tong Daeng (my liver is made of copper)

Phao Dtua Gū Bor Mī Hmai (in cremation, my body will not burn).

Bucha to Luang Phu Hmun should be performed on a Thursday, and should include offerings of; 16 Incense stick, 2 candles (lit), white flowers, or one puang malai garland. Hmak Plū Betel-Areca Nut with chewing paste (5 or 16 portions), a glass of sweet drink such as fizzy drinks, one roasted catfish, some rice or sticky rice, or fermented rice, or even steamed rice pudding.

 

This amulet is an extreme rarity and is in pristine condition and highly eligible for show in competition. Considered extremely powerful protection and prosperity magic from this legendary miracle monk, and one of the most well known amulets of his pantheon. A true Pra Niyom amulet of Master Class, for devotees and aficionados of Luang Phu Hmun Tidtasīlo’s amulets, to treasure and wear with confidence of safety and good fortune.




Look Om Chan Hmak Mid Era Luang Por Tob

One of the more famous types of ‘Krueang Rang’ talismanic amulets of the Great Luang Por Tob (Wat Chon Daen), is the Look Om Chan Hmak Gesa, Sacred Areca-Betel Nut powder ball with Monks hairs, which was most commonly distributed with a cover wrapped in cord with a cord pendant hoop. Most would be wrapped with plain coloured cord, but some special ones were wrapped in tricoloured cords (red white and blue for the Thai Flag), which is known as ‘Trairong’, or ‘Tong Chart’ (meaning ‘National Flag’).

Look Om Chan Hmak Thak Chueak Tong Chart Luang Por Tob

Look Om Chan Hmak Thak Chueak Tong Chart Luang Por Tob

The olden days folk of Pechaburn are said to have preferred the following three types of amulets of Luang Por Tob above all others;

  1. Look Om Chan Hmak
  2.  See Pheung Metta Balm
  3. Takrut

This is because the folk of olden days noticed the effects of these amulets almost immediately after wearing them, and the effects of the amulet were highly noticeable above any doubt of coincidence.

Look Om Chan Hmak Luang Por Tob (Early Era)

It is said that whoever manages to possess all three of these sacred items, is blessed with extremely powerful blessings and will experience immensely luck and good fortunes.

The Look Om Chan Hmak of Luang Por Tob has many legends of miraculous events with devotees who used the Look Om, such as the story of the great Gangster Suea Kam Mee, who was a feared gunman of Hlom Sak District, who was shot with M16 by the police, and the bullets did not pierce his skin or kill him.

When Suea Kam Mee became old and gray, eventually his Look Om Luang Por Tob fell off (the cord ring broke), and he stopped wearing it. Within a few days of not wearing the Look Om he was shot again by enemies, and killed. Suea kam Mee’s grandson one day decided to open the cord wrapping of Suea Kam Mee’s Look Om to see what was inside, and found it to be made of Chan Hmak Betel Areca Nut with Monks hairs mixed in, with a Takrut inserted within it.

Look Om Chan Hmak Luang Por Tob

Luang Por Tob made Look Om over many years, so the Look Om of Luang Por Tob can be found from various eras. he made them in various ways with various appearances, such as bare powder balls rolled with the hand, others wrapped with cords, and even sometimes molded into the shape of Buddha amulets.

Luang Por Tob would mix his Chan Hmak chewed betel-areca with Nam Mont Holy Prayer Water, and add some monk hairs, and roll the paste up into a ball, and wrap it with various kinds of woven cords, depending on which kind of cords were available to him at the time. He would allow his devotees to help him to bind the Look Om with the cords, resulting in some people wrapping them left-handed, and others wrapping them right handed fashion. Some devotees would wrap a single weave, others double or triple weave, resulting in the Look Om of Luang Por Tob having a a large variation of appearances as far as the cord wrapping is concerned.

Sacred Betel Areca Nut Wishing Ball Luang Por Tob

Sacred Betel Areca Nut Wishing Ball Luang Por Tob

But the actual Loom Om when finished had the rule that there had to be a pendant hoop attached, and fully enclosed with cord, with the weave having the appearance of a honeycomb pattern

In the mid and later era of his trajectory, Luang Por Tob began to use See Pheung to coat the Look Om with before wrapping them (and those which were not wrapped too). Some Look Om can be seen visibly to have some See Pheung leaks on the surface of the Look Om, or the cord wrap, which would indicate that the Look Om came from the mid or later era, not the early era where Luang Por did not yet use See Pheung to coat the Look Om with.

Luang Por Tob Wat Chang Phueak (Wat Chon Daen)

Luang Por Tob Wat Chang Phueak (Wat Chon Daen)

The See Pheung he would use would have to be previously empowered before using to coat the Look Om. A Ceremony was made for the See Pheung to be boiled with constant incantations. Luang Por Tob’s apprentices (Luang Por Tong, Pra Giang and Samanera Nid), would assist to collect the residues of the chewed betal-areca and roll them into Look Om, or even into the shape of Buddha amulets.
Luang Por Tob would only perform such a ceremony to make these amulets once every few years, because it was difficult to collect enough Muan Sarn to be able to perform the ceremony properly, and this took a long time to gather enough chewed betel-areca, and the ingredients for the See Pheung

When he would perform these ceremonies, some devotees would sit and wait for them to finish and ask for look om fresh from the ceremony (still not dry), and others would come later to ask for one after they were dried out.

Luang Por Tob of Wat Chon Daen

Luang Por Tob of Wat Chon Daen

The Look Om were always amongst the most popular amulets with his devotees, because they were small and easy to carry/wear, and because of their undoubtable power.

The Looksit of Luang Por Tob value the Look Om Chan Hmak very highly, because they believe that when Luang Por used to chew the betel-areca nuts with his eyes closed in meditation, that he would enter the Jhanic states of absorption. It is considered to be a fact that true empowerment of amulets is performed by the attainment of arupa jhana (formless state of absorption), and so the Looksit believe that the Look Om of Luang Por Tob were properly and poerfully blessed using the correct and powerful method of empowerment

Whoever was able to visit Luang Por Tob and ask for some of his Chan Hmak chewed betel-areca is considered extremely lucky, because Luang Por Tob would only spit it out if asked, and would otherwise always swallow it all, making the Chan Hmak a rare thing to obtain. His Looksit would sit watching him meditate and wait to ask him for some Chan Hmak, in fear of blinking in case he swallowed it before they could ask.

If Luang Por Tob would chew betel in the night time, he would sometimes spit the betel-areca out onto the cliffside near his hut, and when the sediment had accumulated enough, he would ask his apprentices to collect it and gather for later to make amulets with. This was because the number of devotees who had begun to ask for Look Om had become ten times more than the amount he was able to make during the day, and was ever increasing, so Luang Por had to look for ways to increase the amount of Chan Hmak he was able to make for the devotees.

Look Om Chan Hmak See Pheung Luang Por Tob

Look Om Chan Hmak See Pheung Luang Por Tob

The Look Om became famous over the years because of the large number of miraculous stories of devotees experiencing life saving miracles, with Klaew Klaad and Kong Grapan Chadtri protection involved.

Many people would travel to the temple from far afield to ask for Look Om Chan Hmak,and the number of devotees were ever increasing. So Luang Por decided to find a way to provide more to the people, and ordered his looksit to begin a new admixture that was easier to make larger quantity of, by mixing Betel-Areca with the Bai Plu leaf, the chewing cement (Poon Hmak), and mix with his Ya Chun rolling tobacco and other sacred ingredients, which were then mxed into a larg mound of sacred clay and given to Luang Por Tob on a tray to empower the sacred clay in solo.

The samaneras and other apprentice monks of Luang Por Tob would then take the tray of clay and mix it all together again in a large mortar bowl with the previous trays they had made for Luang Por to empower, and keep repeating the process until they had enough of the clay to make a complete edition with.

Then they took the final admixture and returned it to Luang Por Tob for a second empowerment to ensure the power of the Muan Sarn Clay to be as powerful as possible, They then molded the clay into balls and wrapped them with cord, to make them durable against the weather and wear and tear. Once the Look Om were all made, they were placed on a receptacle and returned once more to Luang Por Tob for a further empowerment session.

Look Om Chan Hmak Thak Chueak Early Era Luang Por Tob

Look Om Chan Hmak Thak Chueak Early Era Luang Por Tob

The Look Om which were not wrapped in cord were taken and dried out in the sun. The apprentices would take the still wet clay and lay them out to dry and wrap them in a piece of cloth and tie it up. This is why some of Luang Por Tob’s Look Om are found wrapped inside a piece of cloth, instead of woven cord.

Some apprentices would take a piece of rattan and place the Look Om inside it, and seal the rattan with some Krang Putsa paste, or some candle wax from sacred candles, or even tree sap. Ther apprentices would roll the Chan Hmak into a tiny ball and cover it in Krang Putsa resinous paste and apply flame to the Krang Putsa to seal it around the Look Om. After some time the Krang Putsa paste ran out, so the apprentices would use Khee Pheung Borisut pure forest beesnest beeswax, which was used for making See Pheung, and heat it to make it malleable, and cover the Look Om with it
They would wrap them in cords, and dip the cord wrapped Look Om in Melted beeswax to seal them up and prevent water or insects from being able to get inside. After this, they then began to distribute the Look Om to devotees, and the rest, is History.



Look Om Maha Gan Luang Por Kong Wat Bang Gaporm

Look Om Maha Gan Nuea Pong Wised Luang Por Kong Wat Bang Gaporm circa 2480 BE

Presenting a Look Om of  ‘Benjapakee of Look Om’ Top 5 Status, the Look Om Maha Gan of Luang Por Kong, Wat Bang Gaporm

Sacred Look Om Maha Gan Luang Por Kong Wat Bang Gaporm

The Look Om of Luang Por Kong are famed amongst the top Look Om amulets of all Masters. The Look Om of Luang Por Kong, is classed as one of the five top Look om within the ‘Benjapakee’ of Top Look Om of the five Regions of Thailand. The five members of the Look Om Benjapakee are;

1. Look Om Maha Jinda Mani Montrakom of Pra Palad Parn, Wat Tukata (who was the Upachaya of Luang Phu Bun Wat Klang Bang Gaew) 2. Look Om Maha Gan of Luang Por Kong, Wat Bang Gapom 3. Look Om Grao Paetch of Luang Por Parn, Wat Bang Nom Ko 4. Look Paya Chang Sarn of Wat Bang Wua (Luang Por Ding), and 5. the Look Om of Luang Por Pring, Wat Bang Bakork. The Look Om of Luang Por Kong are found in white, black, gray, brown and pinkish colours, each of which have their points of recognition of the content of the Muan Sarn Sacred Powders in each respective colour.

Look Om Maha Gan Luang Por Kong

It is not every day that one can be lucky enough to encounter the Look Om Luang Por Kong, a Rare Classic Sacred Powder Wishing Ball from the World War Two Era, from a Gaeji Ajarn of Old whose Look Om carry the status of Niyom Category Benjapakee Top 5 Look Om, of Master-Class!

Luang Por Kong (3rd April 2407 – 6th February 2486 BE)

Luang Por Kong Wat Bang Gaporm is a name that devotees have been uttering for over a century now, and which is a name that resounds with fame for Patipata (Purity of Practice) as well as for Wityakom (Wicha Saiyasart Buddha Magic Sorcery).

Luang Por Kong was one of the abbots of Wat Bang Gaporm in Amphoe Ampawa in Samut Songkram, whose Rian Kanajarn Monk Coins are said to be the second most popular monk coins of that era, after Luang Por Gaew of Wat Puang Malai. His Rian Tong Daeng holds fourth position in the most popular coins of all time of the Benjapakee Coin Amulet Family (Most Popular Monk Coins of the Five Main regions of Thailand). His famous Run Badtr Dtan 2486 BE coin in silver with Rachawadee enamels, is very famed for the number of persons who had miraculous events occur whilst wearing the amulet.

Look Om Maha Gan amulet by Luang Por Kong Wat Bang Gaporm

Luang Por Kong was Ordained into the Sangha in 2427 BE in the month of August with Pra Ajarn  Duang as Upachaya Ordaining Officer, and Pra Ajarn  Jui as his Gammawajajarn Prompting Officer and Ajarn Tim of Wat Mueang Mai as his Anusawanajarn Witness. Plus 25 Ordained Monks of the temple attended as witnesses. He was given the ‘Chāyā’ Monk’s Name of ‘Tammachōdtō’, which means ‘He who Advances in Dhamma’

Once he had Ordained, Luang Por Kong began to study and master Pali Sanskrit Grammar, which he found himself to have a great affinity for. He spent 13 years studying and mastering the translation of many Kampira Grimoires with his Kroo Ba Ajarn, and developed immense ability and fluency in Khom Pali Sanskrit. He also took intense interest in the Wicha Prawaet Wityakom (Buddha Magic and Occult Sorcery). He began to practice Magic right from the very beginning of his ordination starting with Pra Ajarn  Duang, his Upachaya, who taught him to master the Wicha Tam Pong Lob Sacred Yantra Powder making ritual method. Luang Por Kong continued to gather Wicha from Luang Por Dtard of Wat Ban Wan Tong, who was a Master Adept of the Wicha Na Bad Dtalord. It was said that Luang Por Dtard was able to blow a Yantra spell through the crown of the head of a devotee sat on a blackboard, and make the Yantra pass through, and appear on the blackboard the devotee was sitting on.

This Wicha which Luang Por Kong Mastered, was the very same Wicha which the great Gaeji Ajarn Luang Por Tong Sukh had also learned from the very same Master. Luang Por Kong also was bestowed Wicha by Luang Por Hrun, of Wat Chang Phueak, who was a monk who possessed supernatural abilities, and who is famed for having passed away seated in meditation.

In his 21st Year of Ordination, the folk of the Municipality Invited Luang Por Kong to accept the position of Abbot of Wat Bang Gaporm, and perform the duty of caring for the temple and its development, and the faith of the devotees of the temple. Luang Por Kong built various edifices to improve the temple in his lifetime, as well as creating the Pra Pha Lelai Buddha statue, and perform many restorations within the temple enclave. His practice and teachings were a source of hope and inspiration to the local Thai Buddhist Folk, for he was always ready and willing to come to the aid of his congregation when asked for help.

Luang Por Kong became ill in the end because he never stopped doing his endless duties, be it building Buddha statues, restoration works on temple buildings, creating and blessing amulets, and attending to the calls of the congregation.  In the 4th Month of each year, he would take his Glod (Umbrella with Mosquito Net), and stay in the cemetery at the side of the temple. He would practice Tudong 13 there for a period of 1 Month each Year. He considered this a self purification practice after spending the whole year busy with the needs of the world, and a withdrawal from the world to reflect on his own practice.

Look Om Maha Gab Sacred Powder Ball Amulet Luang Por Kong

The Miraculous Passing of Luang Por Kong

On the 6th February 2485 BE, Luang Por Kong was seated performing the chanting of the instalment of a Buddha-Rupa image of a local shop in the township, when, just as he had finished blessing the Topknot of the Buddha statue after opening the eyes of the Buddha, he became dizzy and fell to be caught by other Bhikkhus. He was able to regain his awareness and asked to be helped into the meditation posture, where he sat then and entered meditation, and passed away silently.

His devotees remained seated in silence for a long time before they realised he had passed away, and even longer before they could bring themselves to bring Luang Por Kong’s body down from the shop premises.

And so it was that Luang Por Kong passed away in Meditation after blessing a Buddha-Rupa, on 6th February 2485 BE, at age 78, after 58 years of Ordained Life.