Luang Por Tuad statue Wat Huay Mongkol

In the heart of Thailand’s rich spiritual history, lies the legend of Luang Por Tuad, also known as “Luang Pu Tuad,” a name that resonates deeply in every corner of the country. Whether referred to as “Luang Phor Tuat” or “Luang Pu Tuat,” this revered monk’s tale continues to capture the imagination of the Thai people.

Born over four centuries ago, towards the end of King Maha Tamaracha’s reign in Krung Sri Ayuttaya, in the humble village of Suan Jantr, Luang Por Tuad’s life began on a Friday in April, during the Buddhist Era 2125 (the Year of the Dragon in the Chinese zodiac).
image of Luang Por Tuad

From a young age, Luang Por Tuad displayed remarkable compassion and generosity despite his impoverished upbringing. He actively engaged in acts of merit, both in the Buddhist temples and in his everyday interactions with others. Notably, he never caused harm to any living beings, be they human or animal. His childhood nickname was “Luang Poo,” which means “Reverend Grandfather” in Thai.

Wat Chang Hai Temple of Luang Phu Tuad

Wat Chang Hai Temple of Luang Phu Tuad


One remarkable tale from his early years involves a gigantic snake that wrapped itself around his hammock while he was just a baby. Rather than causing alarm, this event was seen as a sign of the child’s special destiny. The family offered offerings to the snake, which subsequently departed, leaving behind a multicolored crystal on the baby’s chest. This crystal brought blessings to his family, providing them with newfound prosperity.
image of a Muan Sarn Sacred Powder Luang Por Tuad Pim Tao Reed amulet

At the age of seven, young Luang Por Tuad entered Wat Kuti Luang to begin his studies, focusing on reading, writing, and education. Remarkably, he quickly mastered the Khom script, which employs ancient Khmer characters for Pali texts. By the age of 15, he was ordained as a novice monk, receiving a mystical crystal from his mother that he would carry with him throughout his life. His spiritual journey continued as he studied with Somdej Pra Chinsaen at Wat See Hyong. Later, he ventured to Nakorn Sri Tammarat, where he honed his knowledge under Samnak Pra Mahatera Biya Tassee. While the young monk adopted the ordained name Ramoe Tammigoe, common folks affectionately called him “Jao Sameeram” or “Jao Sameeramoe.”
image of Pra Luang Por Tuad Pim Tao reed amulet from Wat Chang Hai temple
After completing his studies in Nakorn Sri Tammarat, he embarked on a journey to Ayuttaya. However, the voyage was fraught with peril. A fierce storm arose, forcing the boat to drop anchor in Chumporn district. Superstitions among the seamen led them to believe that Luang Por Tuad was the cause of the storm. They asked him to leave the boat and travel to a nearby island on a rescue boat.

As he traveled to shore, Luang Por Tuad dipped his feet into the water, and to everyone’s surprise, the water around his feet sparkled with a glowing light. The water turned out to be sweet, not salty, a sign of his miraculous abilities. The captain, saved by this act, asked Luang Por Tuad to return to the boat, where he was recognized as a “Gaeji Ajarn,” a master Guru teacher.

Upon arriving in Ayuttaya, Luang Por Tuad settled at Wat Kae temple and continued to deepen his knowledge of Dhamma and the Pali language. In a fateful turn of events, the Sri Lankan ruler, Pra Jao Wadtakaminee, sought to take control of Ayuttaya. To achieve his goal peacefully, he devised a plan involving gold coins with Pali inscriptions that contained the entire Abhidharma, an extensive Buddhist scripture.

The King of Ayuttaya was given a challenge: to translate the inscriptions on these coins within seven days. Failure to do so would result in the city falling under the rule of Pra Jao Wadtakaminee. Panic spread throughout the city, as it seemed impossible to complete the task.

A dream brought hope to the king. He dreamt of a white elephant approaching from the West, a symbol of victory. The dream also foretold the arrival of a young monk from the West who would help complete the translation of the 84,000 Abhidharma coins. The king dispatched his servants to find this young monk.

The search led them to Luang Por Tuad, residing at Wat Rachanuwaas. He matched the description from the king’s dream. With great determination, he began the task of translating the coins. The Brahmins accompanying the coins initially doubted the young monk’s abilities, but Luang Por Tuad’s wisdom silenced them. With divine assistance, he successfully completed the translation in a single evening, saving Ayuttaya.

Luang Phu Tuad 2497

Luang Phu Tuad 2497 first edition amulety of Ajarn Tim of Wat Chang Hai


Shortly after this event, a devastating plague swept through Ayuttaya, causing widespread suffering and death due to the lack of medicine. The king, in desperation, called upon Luang Por Tuad for help. Using his magic crystal and chanting incantations, he cured the sick by providing them with blessed water.

The King, grateful for Luang Por Tuad’s assistance, offered him any request he desired. However, Luang Por Tuad, true to his monastic vows, declined and returned to his hometown, where he resided at Wat Puttasingh Banpot Takoe.

Luang Por Tuad Pra Kroo Bai Diga Wat Chang Hai 2513 BE

Luang Por Tuad Pra Kroo Bai Diga Wat Chang Hai 2513 BE.

As Luang Por Tuad continued his humble life, a pirate ship kidnapped him and sailed out to sea. However, the ship mysteriously came to a halt, and Luang Por Tuad’s compassion led to a miraculous event. He provided the pirates with fresh water and then was returned to the shore, much to the relief of the locals who had been anxiously searching for him.

Luang Por Tuad’s return to his hometown brought joy, and he was given the name “Somdej Jao Pakoe.” He devoted himself to restoring the local temple, and with the help of the King, it was revitalized.

The life of Luang Por Tuad is a testament to the enduring power of faith, compassion, and selflessness in Thai history. His legacy lives on, and his name remains revered, a symbol of hope, miracles, and unwavering dedication to the well-being of others.

The legacy of Luang Por Tuad remains a testament to the enduring power of faith, compassion, and selflessness in Thailand’s history. His teachings and actions have left an indelible mark on the nation’s cultural and spiritual tapestry, and his name is revered to this day.

Phra Kring front and rear

The Mystical Legend of Phra Kring: The Sacred Medicine Buddha

Phra Kring, also known as the Medicine Buddha or Phra Buddha Bhaisajayaguru, stands as a revered figure in the mystical lands of Mahayana Buddhist countries, such as China, Tibet, and Taiwan. Its presence in Thailand’s Theravada tradition can be traced back to the days when Chinese migrants and businessmen ventured into the enchanting Kingdom of Siam. Among their rituals, paying homage to Phra Buddha Bhaisajayaguru became a popular practice, seeking protection and prosperity for their journeys and ventures. As fate would have it, many of these Chinese settlers eventually made Thailand their permanent home.

Pra Kring Prajam Krob Nam Mont Mongkol Gao Luang Por Chaeng

Above; Pra Kring Prajam Krob Nam Mont Mongkol Gao Luang Por Chaeng

As they embarked on long journeys far from their beloved land, they fashioned amulets bearing the likeness of Phra Buddha Bhaisajayaguru, known as “Yau Shi Fwo” or The Medicine Buddha, to accompany them on their travels. Legend has it that the resonating sound of a ball bearing within these amulets echoed the sacred chants of Mahayana, which employ bells. However, the creation of Phra Buddha Bhaisajayaguru amulets differed from the Thai tradition. According to the Mahayana tradition, the amulets were crafted by fusing the history of His Bodhisattvahood and Enlightenment with precious metals. In the Theravada tradition, a mandatory set of yant/takrut and preferably nava loha (9 sacred metals), were employed.

Phra Kring Wat Bovornives Early Era

Phra Kring Wat Bovornives Early Era

The origins of Phra Kring in Thailand date back to the era of King Naresuan and Phra Somdej Panaret in Ayutthaya. The ancient scriptures, known as tamra, which detail the process of creating Phra Kring, state that to forge a truly potent and sacred Phra Kring, an extensive compilation of Yant designs, comprising more than 108 variations in takrut form, must be incorporated. Unfortunately, the tamra was lost during times of war, but it was later entrusted to Somdej Ma of Wat SamPloem, who safeguarded this sacred knowledge for decades. Eventually, Somdej Pavarit of Wat Bovorn inherited this precious wisdom, yet Phra Kring remained relatively unknown until the time of Phra Sangharat Pae, the abbot of Wat Suthat. Driven by his Teacher, Somdej Vanarat Daeng’s miraculous healing, achieved through holy water infused with a piece of Kring Pavarit, Ven. Sangharat Pae became enamored with the extraordinary healing capabilities of Phra Kring. With an unwavering determination, he devoted himself to the research and study of Phra Kring craftsmanship, ultimately leading to the fame and prominence of Phra Kring Wat Suthat.

Phra Sangharat Pae adamantly claimed that Wat Suthat crafted the most exceptional Phra Kring. This proclamation was substantiated by the fact that Wat Suthat Thepwararam, also known as the Temple in the Heavens, stands as one of Thailand’s six most revered temples. The principal Buddha statue of the temple, Phra Sisakayamuni, is positioned at the heart of the city, symbolizing the triumph over demons in alignment with Tamrab Mahapichaisongkram and the profound significance of Pang Marn Vichai Style. It is a realm guarded by celestial beings and benevolent angels. Furthermore, before the end of the year 2536, all the renowned Phra Krings of Wat Suthat were meticulously molded in the presence of the Bot, a sacred and mythical space overseen by Phra Sisakayamuni. It was within this sanctified environment that the Phra Kring amulets acquired their profound ‘Palang Saksit’, or spiritual power. However, in recent times, the practice of molding Phra Krings in such a sacred manner has diminished, and the whereabouts of their current creation remain a closely guarded secret. The enigmatic allure of these sacred objects has only grown with their elusive production.

Below; Phra Kring Wat Sutat Pra Sangkarach Pae

Phra Kring Wat Sutat Pra Sangkarach Pae

The Prominence of Phra Kring Wat Suthat

Driven by the miraculous healing of his Teacher, Somdej Vanarat Daeng, achieved through holy water infused with a piece of Kring Pavarit, Ven. Sangharat Pae became enamored with the extraordinary healing capabilities of Phra Kring. He devoted himself to the research and study of Phra Kring craftsmanship, ultimately leading to the fame and prominence of Phra Kring Wat Suthat. Phra Sangharat Pae adamantly claimed that Wat Suthat crafted the most exceptional Phra Kring. This proclamation was substantiated by the fact that Wat Suthat Thepwararam, also known as the Temple in the Heavens, stands as one of Thailand’s six most revered temples. The principal Buddha statue of the temple, Phra Sisakayamuni, is positioned at the heart of the city, symbolizing the triumph over demons in alignment with Tamrab Mahapichaisongkram and the profound significance of Pang Marn Vichai Style. It is a realm guarded by celestial beings and benevolent angels.

The magic of Phra Kring is found in the presence of the twelve magnificent vows made by Phra Buddha Bhaisajayaguru upon attaining Enlightenment, as recorded in the sacred Medicine Buddha Sutra. Radiating his divine light, he illuminates countless realms, offering the opportunity for all beings to achieve Buddhahood. Through his luminous lapis lazuli radiance, he awakens the dormant minds of sentient beings, guiding them on the path to enlightenment.

Phra Buddha Bhaisajayaguru’s benevolence extends beyond the spiritual realm. He vows to fulfill the material needs of sentient beings, providing them with abundance and prosperity. With unwavering dedication, he dispels heretical views and ignites the flame of true understanding, leading beings onto the path of enlightenment. He compassionately assists those who have faltered in their adherence to the Moral Precepts, especially those incarcerated souls who seek redemption.

Phra Kring Yord Niyom Amulet Encyclopedia

Phra Kring Yord Niyom Amulet Encyclopedia

The Essence of Phra Kring: The Twelve Magnificent Vows

The essence of Phra Kring lies in the embodiment of the twelve magnificent vows made by Phra Buddha Bhaisajayaguru upon attaining Enlightenment, as recorded in the sacred Medicine Buddha Sutra. These vows reflect the Medicine Buddha’s compassionate nature and his commitment to bringing healing, enlightenment, and relief to all sentient beings.

  1. Radiating Divine Light: Phra Buddha Bhaisajayaguru illuminates countless realms with his divine light, offering the opportunity for all beings to achieve Buddhahood.
  2. Awakening Dormant Minds: Through his luminous lapis lazuli radiance, the Medicine Buddha awakens the dormant minds of sentient beings, guiding them on the path to enlightenment.
  3. Material Fulfillment: Phra Buddha Bhaisajayaguru vows to fulfill the material needs of sentient beings, providing them with abundance and prosperity.
  4. Dispelling Heretical Views: With unwavering dedication, the Medicine Buddha dispels heretical views and ignites the flame of true understanding, leading beings onto the path of enlightenment.
  5. Healing Powers: The Medicine Buddha’s healing powers are renowned far and wide. He brings solace to those afflicted by physical ailments, deformities, and illnesses, offering them the hope of restoration and well-being.
  6. Relief from Suffering: Phra Buddha Bhaisajayaguru’s compassionate embrace extends to the destitute and the sick, providing them with relief from suffering and offering a glimmer of hope in their darkest hours.
  7. Guiding Transformation: For women yearning for rebirth as men, the Medicine Buddha guides them on their desired path of transformation.
  8. Healing Mental Disturbances: The mind, often burdened by afflictions and delusions, finds solace in the Medicine Buddha’s presence. With his divine touch, he helps heal mental disturbances, bringing clarity and serenity to troubled souls.
  9. Liberation from Oppression: The oppressed find refuge in the compassionate gaze of Phra Buddha Bhaisajayaguru, as he liberates them from the chains of suffering and injustice.
  10. Alleviating Hunger and Thirst: In the face of insurmountable hunger and thirst, the Medicine Buddha alleviates the unbearable anguish of those afflicted, bestowing upon them nourishment and relief.
  11. Clothing the Destitute: Furthermore, Phra Buddha Bhaisajayaguru extends his compassionate hand to clothe the destitute, shielding them from the biting cold and torment of mosquitoes.
  12. Invocation of Blessings: To invoke the blessings of Phra Buddha Bhaisajayaguru and Phra Kring, one can recite the sacred Katha, a powerful mantra that connects with the divine energy of the Medicine Buddha, bringing forth healing, protection, and spiritual enlightenment.

Medicine Buddha

The Medicine Buddha’s healing powers are renowned far and wide. He brings solace to those afflicted by physical ailments, deformities, and illnesses, offering them the hope of restoration and well-being. His compassionate embrace extends to the destitute and the sick, providing them with relief from suffering and offering a glimmer of hope in their darkest hours. For women yearning for rebirth as men, he guides them on their desired path of transformation.

The mind, often burdened by afflictions and delusions, finds solace in the Medicine Buddha’s presence. With his divine touch, he helps heal mental disturbances, bringing clarity and serenity to troubled souls. The oppressed find refuge in his compassionate gaze, as he liberates them from the chains of suffering and injustice.

In the face of insurmountable hunger and thirst, Phra Buddha Bhaisajayaguru alleviates the unbearable anguish of those afflicted, bestowing upon them nourishment and relief. Furthermore, he extends his compassionate hand to clothe the destitute, shielding them from the biting cold and torment of mosquitoes.

Phra Kring Avalokitesworn Luang Por Kasem Khemago

To invoke the blessings of Phra Buddha Bhaisajayaguru and Phra Kring, one can recite the sacred Katha:

Namo Bhagavate Bhaiśajyaguru Vaidūryaprabharājāya Tathāgatāya Arhate Samyaksambuddhāya Tadyathā: Oṃ Bhaiśajye Bhaiśajye Bhaiśajya-Samudgate Svāhā

These powerful words hold the key to connecting with the divine energy of the Medicine Buddha, bringing forth healing, protection, and spiritual enlightenment.

As the legacy of Phra Kring endures, the mystique surrounding its creation and the profound vows of Phra Buddha Bhaisajayaguru continue to captivate the hearts and minds of devotees. With each passing day, the ancient wisdom of this sacred talisman persists, guiding seekers on their spiritual journey and offering solace to those in need.Bhaiṣajyaguru, also known as the Medicine Buddha, is the leader of a group of eight healing Buddhas. Shakyamuni Buddha, the historical Buddha, is also one of these eight Buddhas.

Phra Kring Sapa Phu Taen Rasadorn 2547

The Everlasting Power of Phra Kring

The essence of Phra Kring lies in its ability to channel the divine energy and blessings of Phra Buddha Bhaisajayaguru. As devotees wear or keep Phra Kring amulets close to them, they believe in the amulet’s power to bring forth healing, protection, and prosperity. The resonance of the sacred vows made by the Medicine Buddha serves as a constant reminder of his boundless compassion and the transformative potential of spiritual enlightenment.

Connecting with Phra Kring’s Blessings

To connect with the blessings of Phra Kring, devotees often recite the sacred Katha, a mantra that invokes the divine energy of Phra Buddha Bhaisajayaguru. The Katha holds the key to establishing a deep spiritual connection and opening oneself to the healing and transformative powers of Phra Kring. By reciting the Katha with sincerity and devotion, one can invite the presence of the Medicine Buddha into their lives and experience the profound impact of his compassionate energy.

 

 

Rian Run Raek Luang Por Hmun

The most highly preferred and rare guru monk coin amulets of the great Master Monk Luang Phu Hmun of Wat Ban Jan, in Sri Saket, the ‘Rian Run Raek’, or, ‘Rian Laekh 1’ amulet, with number 1 code stamp indented into the front surface of the amulet. Although called the ‘Rian Laekh 1’, meaning ‘coin with number 1’ this amulet was also made without the number 1 code stamp in some exhibits, hence, many people prefer to call it the ‘Rian Run Raek’ (first edition coin), of 2452 BE. Only 5000 amuletsa were made in Nuea Tong Daeng, with only another 35 Gammagarn edition versions in solid silver.

1st edition coin amulet Luang Phu Hmun Wat Ban Jan 2528

1st edition coin amulet Luang Phu Hmun Wat Ban Jan 2528


In truth it is hard to name which coin amulet as Luang Phu Hmun’s first edition, because he released various at various temples, so each temple has a ‘first edition’ amulet which was released and blessed by Luang Phu Hmun, such as the Rian Run Raek Hlang Hanuman released at Wat Ban Jan in 2542, is also referred to as first edition, for its simultaneous release, and the4 fact it was the first and only time that design model was released. Each design has therefore its own ‘first edition’ because often they are made again in later years due to high popularity and demand from devotees in the case of many amulets from many masters. This is a common truth in general in the Thai amulet world.

1st edition coin amulet Luang Phu Hmun Wat Ban Jan 2528 BE Rear Face

The revered and rare guru monk coin amulets of the esteemed Master Monk Luang Phu Hmun, from Wat Ban Jan in Sri Saket, hold great significance. Among these treasures is the distinguished ‘Rian Run Raek’ or ‘Rian Laekh 1’ amulet, bearing a unique number 1 code stamp delicately etched on its front surface. While it is commonly referred to as the ‘Rian Laekh 1,’ denoting a coin with the number 1, it is worth noting that some examples of this amulet were crafted without the number 1 code stamp. Consequently, many enthusiasts prefer to call it the ‘Rian Run Raek,’ signifying the first edition coin, originating from the auspicious year 2452 BE.

Determining which coin amulet truly represents Luang Phu Hmun’s first edition can be a challenge since he released various editions at different temples. Each temple has its own ‘first edition’ amulet, meticulously crafted and blessed by Luang Phu Hmun. For instance, the Rian Run Raek Hlang Hanuman, released at Wat Ban Jan in 2542 BE, is also regarded as a first edition due to its simultaneous release and the fact that it was the initial and sole occasion this specific design model was made available. Each design, therefore, possesses its own distinct ‘first edition’ as they are often reproduced in subsequent years to meet the immense popularity and demand among devoted followers and collectors. This phenomenon is a common reality in the vibrant realm of Thai amulets, embraced and understood by enthusiasts and practitioners alike.

Rian Laekh 1 Luang Phu Hmun Wat Ban Jan 2542 BE Magazine Documentation


Amulets of Luang Phu Songk Wat Jao Fa Sala Loi

Ya Sen (Ya Soop) of Luang Por Songk:

In the realm of mystical charms and spiritual treasures, there exists a rare and sacred magical charm known as the Ya Sen (Ya Soop). This enchanting muan sarn is sacred tobacco from smoking or chewing, by LP Songk, and used to make amulets, revered by devotees of the esteemed Luang Por Songk. The Ya Soop holds a profound significance in the spiritual realm of Thai Buddhist amulet aficionados. It is a testament to the divine connection between the wearer and Luang Por Songk, a Maha Thera Gaeji Ajarn whose spiritual mastery remains unparalleled.

The Sacred “Ya Soop” Tobacco

Look Om Ya Soop Luang Phu Songk

Look Om Ya Soop Luang Phu Songk Sacred Tobacco

The Ya Sen, also known as “smoking medicine” or “aromatic medicine,” manifests itself in two distinct forms—a spherical encasement of loose tobacco and as one of Luang Por Songk’s sacred cigar stubs. Within the sphere lies the highly sacred Ya Sen, a spiritual conduit that establishes a profound connection with Luang Por Songk through the practice of Gurunussati. The spherical Waterproof Casing of this exhibit classifies it as belonging to the sacred “Look Om” category. However, it is worth noting that the Ya Sen of Luang Por Songk can also be found in the form of his revered cigars.
Luang Por Songk, Master Sorceror Monk of Wat Jao Fa Sala Loi in Chumpon.

The Great Luang Phu Songk was known for his Holy Prayer water and its ability to fend off even the most powerful black magic, and was reputed to be able to take Hnang Kwai buffalo skin (sacred magical substance), and Mitmor knifes into the stomach without any wounds or bleeding, and insert magical objects under the skin of a devotee, just by performing incantations.[/caption]

The Mystical Essence of Spirituality within the Ya Soop

The Ya Soop, or Magic Ya Sen, carries within it the very essence of Luang Por Songk’s spiritual practice and blessings. It possesses a divine potency believed to bring forth luck, protection, and spiritual elevation to those fortunate enough to wear it. The enchantments bestowed upon this sacred tobacco by Luang Por Songk create a powerful aura of positivity, shielding the wearer from negative influences while attracting auspicious energies.

Luang Por Songk’s Divine Influence

Luang Por Songk Chantasaro of Wat Jao Fa Sala Loi was revered not only for his Magic Ya Sen amulets but also for his profound ability to bless and heal through his Holy Prayer Water. His fame as an adept and his popularity as a spiritual guide extended across two regions—the Southern province of Chumphon and the bustling city of Bangkok. Devotees from far and wide flocked to Luang Por Songk’s humble abode, where they encountered a water bowl filled with the sacred Holy Prayer Water. This blessed elixir, infused with the energy of his nightly meditations, possessed extraordinary healing properties.

Mortal Remains (Sri-Ra), of the Great Luang Phu Songk, during the funerary rites.

Mortal Remains (Sri-Ra), of the Great Luang Phu Songk, during the funerary rites.

Those who had the privilege of drinking or using this Holy Prayer Water for their devotional prayers witnessed miraculous transformations within themselves. Countless individuals experienced solace, healing, and blessings, as the divine miracles performed by Luang Por Songk brought them closer to their deepest desires and aspirations.

Biography of Luang Por Songk Chantasaro

Biographical photograph of Luang Por Songk Chantasaro (2432 - 2526 BE)

Biographical photograph of Luang Por Songk Chantasaro (2432 – 2526 BE)

The life journey of Luang Por Songk Chantasaro was one intertwined with spiritual exploration, meditation, and unwavering service to others. Let us delve into some key milestones that shaped the extraordinary life of this revered master.

Birth and Early Years

Luang Por Songk Chantasaro entered this world on a sacred Tuesday, during the first phase of the sixth month in the Lunar Calendar of the year 2433 BE. Born in Swee Township, nestled amidst the fertile lands where his parents toiled as humble farmers, his path was destined for greatness.

Ordination and Forest Wandering

At the tender age of 18, Luang Por Songk embarked upon the path of enlightenment as a Samanera Novice Monk at Wat Swee. For two years, he immersed himself in the study of Dhamma Vinaya, the profound teachings of Buddhism. However, he temporarily disrobed to assist his family on the farm, a testament to his deep-rooted sense of familial duty.
Image of the Great Luang Por Songk Chantasaro in meditative posture. Luang Por Songk was the abbot of Wat Jao Fa Sala Loi Buddhist temple
Yearning to deepen his spiritual practice, at the age of 21, Luang Por Songk returned to Wat Swee seeking permission to re-ordain as a fully fledged Bhikkhu. His soul yearned for solitude, and he embarked on an extensive journey through forests and mountains. Under the guidance of esteemed masters, he delved into the teachings of Buddhism, honing his meditation techniques, and furthering his spiritual growth.

Attaining Adepthood

After years of unwavering dedication, rigorous training, and a relentless pursuit of wisdom, Luang Por Songk achieved the esteemed status of Maha Thera Gaeji Ajarn. His profound insights, exceptional healing powers, and extraordinary psychic abilities earned him the unwavering reverence of the monastic community and the general public alike.
The Great Luang Phu Songk was known for his Holy Prayer water and its ability to fend off even the most powerful black magic, and was reputed to be able to take Hnang Kwai buffalo skin (sacred magical substance), and Mitmor knifes into the stomach without any wounds or bleeding, and insert magical objects under the skin of a devotee, just by performing incantations.

Establishing Wat Jao Fa Sala Loi

Inspired by his spiritual calling, Luang Por Songk established Wat Jao Fa Sala Loi—a sanctuary of peace nestled amidst the serene beauty of Chumphon. This sacred abode became a beacon of hope for spiritual seekers, who sought solace, guidance, and the blessings bestowed by the enlightened master.
Look Om Ya Soop Luang Phu Songk Wat Jao Fa Sala Loi

Legacy and Passing

Luang Por Songk’s physical presence may have transcended to the realm of eternal bliss in the year 2552 BE, but his spiritual legacy lives on, inspiring and uplifting the lives of countless individuals. His profound teachings continue to guide seekers on their path towards enlightenment, and his benevolent presence is felt by all those who seek his wisdom.
Amulets of Luang Phu Songk, Wat Jao Fa Sala Loi

The magical amulets and blessings of Luang Por Songk continue to bless the lives of those who connect with his enchanted Ya Sen and other amulets many of which were sprayed and blessed in the sacred Holy Prayer Water of Luang Phu Songk. The magic of his divine blessings remains an eternal source of healing, protection, and spiritual elevation to those who revere this Great Khao Or Lineage Buddhist Master.

LP Chaem Amulet Wat Chalong Pukhet

The Pra Pong Roop Muean Sacred Powder Votive Tablet image of the Great 18th Century Monk, Luang Por Chaem, was released by the Gammagarn Comittee of Wat Chalong, for the Golden Jubilee Celebration Edition in 2539 BE, commemorating the 50th Year of Reign of His Majesty King Bhumipol Adulyadej. This sacred powder amulet is made in Nuea Pong Ittijae and features the classic image of Luang Por Chaem standing with the Bai Pad Yos Royal Fan, which is often used for classic celebratory memorial editions at Wat Chalong.

Pong Roop Muean LP Chaem 2539 BE Wat Chalong

The amulets of Luang Por Chaem of Wat Chalong are held in high regard by Malaysians and Singaporeans who have visited Phuket since the colonial era. These visitors pay reverence to LP Chaem and the lineage masters by visiting the temple of Wat Chalong. His amulets are considered to be miraculous and are sought after by those who believe in the power of sacred objects.

Luang Por Chaem was born in the heart of Phang Nga Province, in the year of the Gun, 1827, during the reign of King Nang Klao. He was to become perhaps Phuket’s most internationally famous master monk from the 18th century to this very day. Officially in his Dhamma Trajectory, he became known as Pra Kru Wisutwongsajarn Yan Muni, but to many, he was simply Luang Por Chaem.

Amulets of LP Chaem

 

He was a man of great piety and discipline, becoming the former abbot of Chaithararam Temple, or Chalong Temple, and was held in high esteem by the people of Phuket. Unfortunately, there is no documented evidence of Luang Por Chaem’s parents’ names, as it was common for country folk in Siam during that era to forgo the registration of birth, death, and even marriage certificates. It was a time when traveling to the closest government office was difficult, especially for those living in the countryside, and as such, these matters were not of great importance to them.

Pong Roop Muean LP Chaem 2539 (Rear Face)

At a young age, his parents sent him to live at Wat Chalong, in the Chalong Subdistrict of Thung Kha District, now Mueang Phuket District. Here, he became a disciple of Father Than Kao Abbot and was ordained as a novice and eventually became a monk, studying Vipassana Kammathana Mindfulness Practice, and Wicha, at Wat Chalong until he became proficient.

Luang Por Chaem was known to be strict in the Dhamma and discipline, commanding the faith and devotion of the villagers in general. As such, he was later appointed as the abbot of Wat Chalong. In the year 2419 BE (1876), a group of Chinese tin miners instigated an uprising in Phuket. Luang Por Chaem’s disciples urged him to flee and hide, but he refused to leave the temple and escape. In a show of support, his disciples joined forces to fight to protect him and asked for Pha Yant Pha Yant Prajiad cloth as a morale booster. Luang Por Chaem complied with the request, and this group went on to win the Battle of the Triads.

Pong Roop Muean LP Chaem 2539 BE Nuea Pong Ittijae

The victory inspired more people to join the fight against the Chinese triads, relying on the Pha Yant Prajiad cloth made by Luang Por Chaem as a source of inspiration. The Chinese triads were eventually chased away from Chalong village, and the following year, there were no more attempts to rob the village.

Due to his merits in suppressing the Triad Rebellion, Luang Por Chaem was granted a portion of the merit by the Phuket Political Department. His Majesty The King graciously appointed Luang Por Chaem to have his ordained name of ‘Pra Kru Sangkha Pha Moke’, of Phuket to be changed, and that he should be awarded the official elevation of status into the High Sangha Priesthood as “Pra Kru Wisutwongsajarn Yan Muni”. He was conferred this name at Wat Chalong Mai (Wat Chaithararam). This means that he was considered to have accumulated spiritual merit, which is believed to bring about positive effects in the afterlife. This merit was likely granted to him as a reward for his contributions to the community and to Buddhism.

In addition to his spiritual merit, Luang Por Chaem was also awarded with various honors and titles for his services. He was granted the title of Phra Kru (monk with royal patronage) by King Chulalongkorn and was later promoted to the rank of Phra Khru Pariyattikhun (senior monk with royal patronage) by King Vajiravudh. He was also appointed as the abbot of Wat Sam Pao in 1907 and served in this position until his death in 1935.

Luang Por Chaem’s legacy lives on in Thailand and beyond. He is remembered for his contributions to Buddhism, his efforts to promote education and social welfare, and his exemplary life as a monk. Many temples and organizations have been named after him, and his teachings continue to inspire people to this day.

Rian Luang Por Pring Thai Amulet

Presenting a very rare Rian Kanajarn Guru Monk coin amulet, the Rian Roop Khai Nuea Tong Daeng Rom Dam Run Sorng, (second ever edition coin amulet), of the Great Luang Por Pring Intachodto, of Wat Bang Bakork. This exhibit comes already encased in solid gold waterproof casing included in the price. A top Master Class Pra Niyom Category amulet of the High End variety, for serious devcotees and collectors of this great master, whose amulets are among the rarest to encounter.

Rian Luang Por Pring 2514

 

Luang Por Pring Intachodto, was well known to be a ‘Mor Ya’ Traditional Medicine annd Spiritual healing Master. He also had the honor of being Declared a Powerful Adept, by the great Master Monk Luang Phu Sukh, of Wat Pak Klong Makham Tao, and of receiving Kammathāna secrets from the Great Luang Por Parn, of Wat Bang Nom Kho.

A Great Master, whose magic was known in both the 2nd World War and Indo-China wars, as a protective amulet maker of great power. Luang Por Pring was one of the Great Tonburi Masters, whose amulets were highly favored by the miltary and police, and rescue forces, for protective powers during times of war or calamity.

Rear Face Rian Luang Por Pring 2514

The Rian Luang Por Pring is renowned for its Kong Grapan Chadtri and Klaew Klaad powers to save lives in extreme dangerous situations. Luang Por Pring, was one of the various Kroo Ba Ajarn of Grom Luang Chumporn. Even the great Luang Por Parn of Wat Bang Nom Kho came to Wat Bang Bakork to learn the Wicha Look Om from Luang Por Pring. These days the amulets of Luang Por Pring are extremely rare amulets to find anywhere.

 

Encyclopedia of the Amulets of Luang Por Pring

Luang Por Pring made many highly preferred amulets in many froms, ranging from Pra Somdej, Look Om, Buddha Images of various postures and styles,Takrut, and Look Om. LP Pring was famous for his Look Om Maha Gan, and Look Om See Chompoo sacred wishing balls, and many other Muan Sarn Sacred Powders amulets. Of course his most prized amulets with his top devotees are his Monk Coins, for the obvious connection with the Guru, through his image.

But it is perhaps his Look Om which are the most seen and talked about, perhaps because of the fact that many of his other amulets, are now very rare to find in the present day, and less people in general know of their existence, apart from the high-end collectors and devout followers of Luang Por Pring.

Luang Por Pring Intachodto Wat Bang Bakork

The Look Om Luang Por Pring was made mostly in both Gray and Brownish colored Sacred powders, and is an extremely rare and powerful amulet, most highly sought after by devotees of this Genre. In addition, a very small number of Black color, and some of these white colored Look Om are also found in existence, as well as some very rare pink colored models, both of which are most highly preferred of all from this Master along with his grayish ‘Nuea Pong Pasom Toop versions.

Look Om Luang Por Pring

It is assumed that the Wicha he received from making Pra Somdej according to the formula of Somdej Dto, may have influenced this particular mixture of Muan Sarn Sacred Powders used for his Pong Puttakun white versions, which indeed have many aspects which resemble the sacred clay of Pra Somdej Wat Rakang including Pong Bpathamang, Pong Puttakun, Pong Trinisinghae, Pong Ittijae, and Pong Maharach.

It is not every day that one can be lucky enough to encounter a sacred amulet of Luang Por Pring, a Classic Master-Class Kong Grapan Chadtri Klaew Klaad amulet, from a Master Geji Ajarn who carries the status of Kroo Ba Ajarn in Wicha, to the Great Luang Por Parn, of Wat Bang Nom Kho. Powerful Protection from a Niyom Category amulet, of Master-Class Status, of the Great Luang Por Pring.

During the Indojin (Indo-China Wartime) 3rd largest blessing ceremony of amulets in the History of Thai Buddhism at Wat Sutat, LP Pring was invited with a host of other master monks, to bless the world famous Pra Kring amulet, of the great Pra Sangkarach (Pae).

Below; Somdej Pra Sangkarach Pae, of Wat Sutat

Somdej Pra Sangkarach Pae Wat Sutat

All the Bhikkhus who attended the empowerment ritual, inscribed Magical Khom Agkhara Spells onto Sacred Yantra Foils. These sacred plates were smelted and poured into the molds.

When Luang Phor Pring’s Yantra Foil spells were placed inside the smelting furnace to be smelted intosacred ingots along with the other Yantra Foils from other Masters, it is told that it was not possible to get them to melt at that heat. This astonished those who witnessed this, and so Luang Por Pring was asked to assist in helping them to melt.

 

Rear Face Rian Luang Por Pring Wat Bang Bakork 2514

Luang Por Pring performed some special incantations, and cast some spells over the sacred furnace, and slowly but surely, the Yantra Foils began to melt and mix with the other Sacred chanuan metals.

Luang Por Pring’s protective magic was famous since around the 2nd World War and Indo-China Wartimes, when a Japanese Base was built nearby to the temple of Wat Bang Bakork. It was believed that lp Pring has made a protective Kata and Magical Shield around the area to protect the temple and the local inhabitants around it. So at that time, many people moved to live in tyhe surrounding area, in the belief that they would be safe from the bombing which was being performed by the Western Forces during that time of Japanese Occupation in Thailand.

Another story of his legendary magical powers, was the fact that the Great Magician and Looksit of Luang Phu Sukh, and Royal Prince, Admiral Grom Luang Chumporn Udomsak, sought out lpo Pring to beseech magical Wicha from him and his tutelage.

Below; Luang Phu Sukh  Wat Pak Klong Makham Tao

Luang Phu Sukh Wat Pak Klong Makham Tao

The legend tells, that LP Pring initiated him fully,and as a gift of Initiation, presented Grom Luang Chumporn with a Ban Neng (forehead of the skull), imbued with the spirit of the Mae Nak Pra Khanong Hoeng Prai Deva Spirit. The very same Mae Nak Pra Khanong which you can see in a shrine at Pra Khanong in Bangkok, on the Sukhumvit Road to this very day.

Below: Grom Luang Chumporn

Grom Luang Chumporn Udomsak

This is the very same spirit, who was so famously untamable, due to her anger at her unforeseen early death, and great desire to remain with her still living husband, that was bothering many people in the area. When Grom Luang Chumporn took the Ban Neng to the Palace, and various relatives within the Royal Palace witnessed seeing the ghost.

It is said that the great Somdej Pra Puttajarn (Dto) Prohmrangsri performed a ritual to subdue the spirit once and for all, by inscribing the forehead bone and inserting a spell to ‘sakot’ (bind) the spirit once and for all.

It is recorded in the diary of Pra Maha Saeni Wongs Na Ayuttaya, who authored the official documentational biography of Somdej Pra Puttajarn (Dto) Prohmrangsri, that, after the passing of Somdej Dto, the Ban Neng Forehead Bone of the Mae Pra Khanong Hoeng Prai Ghost, was handed down to Somdej Pra Puttajarn Tut, who in turn, gave the Ban Neng to Luang Por Pring. Luang Por Pring then, as already told, passed the Ban Neng on to Grom Luang Chumporn.


Luang Phor Pring was born on the Lunar Precession of 15 Kam (full moon), on a Sunday the fourth of April, in the year 2412 BE. He was hence born in the Chinese Horoscrope astrological year of the horse. He was ordained as a Samanera Novice Monk at a young age, and was educated at Wat Plab Officially known as Wat Rachasitaram), in Tonburi (then still countryside, but now part of Bangkok).

Look Om and other Amulets of Luang Por Pring

He remained ordained as a Samanera, until he reached age 20, in the year 2432. It was here that he began to study and practice Wicha Akom (Buddha Magic), and became adept, for Wat Plab was indeed always one of the main academies of Magical Arts. Wat Plab is known to have been the place where most of the Great master Monks of Olden days we all know and revere went, to develop and test their skills in psychic empowerment. Masters such as Luang Phu Sukh, Luang Por Ngern, Luang Phu To, Somdej Pra Puttajarn (Dto) Prohmrangsri, and the like, all passed the proving grounds of psychic adepthood at Wat Plab.

Side View of Rian Luang Por Pring 2514

It is said that only Great Masters can pass the test of the proving ground of Magic that is Wat Plab, and is part of where the Great Masters obtained their full cotrol of their powers. It was hear by monks close to Luang Por Pring, thaty he secretly learned the Wicha Long Hon (Invisibility spell), and became a Master Adept of Kong Grapan Chadtri Magic, as he was still a young Samanera Novice at Wat Plab.

He was then ordained on the 1st March in the year 2432 BE to become a fully-fledged Bhikkhu in the Buddha Sasana, at the temple of Wat Tong Noppakun, in Klong Sarn.

After ordination, he received the ‘Chaya’ (Monk’s name), of “Pra Kroo Prasas Sikij Intachodti” and moved to Wat Bang Bakork. After a mere 3 years or so, he was elected to become the Abbot, as at the time there were only a very few monks staying there, and the temple was in need of repair, and advancement, for the temple was in disrepair, and there were many things missing for the necessities of daily life.

Side View of Rear Face Rian Luang Por Pring 2514

Not all his works of development of Wat Bang Bakork are recorded, but one of the well known atainments he made was his restoration of the Uposatha Shrineroom, Kuti Huts for kore Bhikkhus to come and reside, and the many fracilitieds necessary such as refectory, prayer hall, meditation hall, temple bell, Chedi Stupa, and the like.

In the year 2479 BE, Luang Por Pring was elevated in status and given the Chaya name of ‘Pra Kroo Pra Sasana Sikij, for many of his devotees were Royal Courtiers, and he had a National Following of Devotees, that resounded around the country, for his great deeds and powerful magic. Members of Royal family and their Courtiers would often come to stay and keep precepts and practice meditation under Luang Por Pring. It is not documented as to the year of his passing, as far as our investigations have led to date.

Luang Por Pring was known both for his diligent practice and prowess in the Buddha-Dhamma Vinaya, as well as for ppossessing and developing many Magical Wicha, and methods of empowering different amulets, and the mastery of making powerful Muan Sarn Sacred Powders, and psychic empowerment.


Luang Phu Mun Puritatto

Rian Lai Ganok Sacred Guru Monk Coin with ‘Ganok’ flamed embellishments around the edges, and the Image of Luang Phu Mun Puritadto, of Wat Pha Sutawas emblazoned. This is a limited series Gammagarn version, with series code stamp, which is seen on the Sangkati sash of the Guru Monk, bearing the Code Met Nga Sesame seed shaped stamp, with a Khom Sanskrit Letter embossed.

Luang Phu Mun Thai amulet

The amulet has the images of an almsbowl, a kettle and a Glod Umbrella, the basic traveling necessities of the Thai Tudong Forest Tradition Lineage of LP Mun. The amulet was released in 2520 BE, and is first edition, after Luang Por Kinaree released his own first edition coin with his own image in the year 2519 BE. This series of amulets were fashioned in the same shape, but with the image of Luang Phu Mun Puritatto, blessed by Lineage Master, and Abbot of Wat Gantasilawas, Luang Por Kinaree Jantiyo, in Grand Buddha Abhisekha ceremony. The ceremony was held directly at Wat Gandtasilawas in Nakorn Phanom, with a host of other great Tudong Masters of the Luang Phu Mun Thai Forest Tradition.

The amulet has the Kata ‘namo Wmudtaanang Namo Wimudtiyaa’ on the rear face below the almsbowl, the Kata of LP Mun, representing the heart of the Tudong Kammathana Practice. The amulet is forged from Nuea Tong Daeng Sacred Copper Brazen Alloy, and was blessed on the 13th April 2520 BE after Traimas three month nightly empowerments at the temple beforehand. The amulet has the words ‘Puritadto’ on the front of the base of the amulet, with Luang Phu Mun seated in meditation above.


The amulets were released in the year 2513-2514 BE in a very special Buddha Abhiseka, at the temple of Wat Gantasilaram, with a large number of some of the greatest Guru Masters of the time present to empower, from the lineage of Luang Phu Mun

Ajarn Mun Bhuridatta Thera (Thai: มั่น ภูริทตฺโต, rtgs: Ajarn Mun Phurithatto; Lao: ຫຼວງປູ່ມັ່ນ ພູຣິທັຕໂຕ), 1870–1949, was a Thai bhikkhu of Lao descent who is credited, along with his mentor, Ajarn Sao Kantasīlo, with establishing the Thai Forest Tradition or “Kammaṭṭhāna tradition” that subsequently spread throughout Thailand and to several countries abroad. Ajarn Mun was born in Baan Kham Bong, a farming village in Ubon Ratchathani Province, Isan.
Ordained as a monk in 1893, he spent the remainder of his life wandering through Thailand, Burma, and Laos, dwelling for the most part in the forest, engaged in the practice of meditation. He attracted an enormous following of students and, together with his teacher, Sao Kantasīlo (1861–1941), established the Thai Forest Tradition (the kammaṭṭhāna tradition) that subsequently spread throughout Thailand and to several countries abroad. He died at Wat Suddhavasa, Sakon Nakhon Province.

Ajarn Mun was born in Baan Kham Bong, a farming village in Ubon Ratchathani Province, Isan. Ordained as a monk in 1893, he spent the remainder of his life wandering through Thailand, Burma, and Laos, dwelling for the most part in the forest, engaged in the practice of meditation. He attracted an enormous following of students and, together with his teacher, Sao Kantasīlo (1861–1941), established the Thai Forest Tradition (the Kammaṭhāna tradition) that subsequently spread throughout Thailand and to several countries abroad. He died at Wat Pha Sutawas, Sakon Nakhon Province. (Wikipedia)

We would like to share a passage written by Luang Por Thanissaro Bhikkhu (Ajarn Geoffrey de-Graaf), who wrote a most explanatory essay of the role of the Great Ajarn Mun in the revival of the true Buddhist Practice and the Rise of the Thai Tudong Kammathana Forest tradition;

Throughout its history, Buddhism has worked as a civilizing force. Its teachings on karma, for instance — the principle that all intentional actions have consequences — have taught morality and compassion to many societies. But on a deeper level, Buddhism has always straddled the line between civilization and wilderness. The Buddha himself gained Awakening in a forest, gave his first sermon in a forest, and passed away in a forest.

The qualities of mind he needed in order to survive physically and mentally as he went, unarmed, into the wilds, were key to his discovery of the Dhamma. They included resilience, resolve, and alertness; self-honesty and circumspection; steadfastness in the face of loneliness; courage and ingenuity in the face of external dangers; compassion and respect for the other inhabitants of the forest.

These qualities formed the “home culture” of the Dhamma.
Periodically, as Buddhism spread and adapted to different societies, some practitioners felt that the original message of the Dhamma had become diluted. So they returned to the wilderness in order to revive its home culture. Many wilderness traditions are still alive today, especially in the Theravada countries of Sri Lanka and Southeast Asia. There, mendicant ascetic monks continue to wander through the remaining rainforests, in search of Awakening in the same environment where the Buddha found Awakening himself.

Among these wilderness traditions, the one that has attracted the largest number of Western students, and is beginning to take root in the West, is the Kammatthana (Meditation) Forest tradition of Thailand.

The Kammatthana tradition was founded by Ajarn Mun Bhuridatto in the early decades of this century. Ajarn Mun’s mode of practice was solitary and strict. He followed the Vinaya (monastic discipline) faithfully, and also observed many of what are known as the thirteen classic dhutanga (ascetic) practices, such as living off almsfood, wearing robes made of cast-off rags, dwelling in the forest, eating only one meal a day.

Searching out secluded places in the wilds of Thailand and Laos, he avoided the responsibilities of settled monastic life and spent long hours of the day and night in meditation. In spite of his reclusive nature, he attracted a large following of students willing to put up with the hardships of forest life in order to study with him.
He also had his detractors, who accused him of not following traditional Thai Buddhist customs. He usually responded by saying that he wasn’t interested in bending to the customs of any particular society — as they were, by definition, the customs of people with greed, anger, and delusion in their minds. He was more interested in finding and following the Dhamma’s home culture, or what he called the customs of the noble ones: the practices that had enabled the Buddha and his disciples to achieve Awakening in the first place.

This phrase — the customs of the noble ones — comes from an incident in the Buddha’s life: not long after his Awakening, he returned to his home town in order to teach the Dhamma to the family he had left six years earlier. After spending the night in a forest, he went for alms in town at daybreak. His father the king learned of this and immediately went to upbraid him. “This is shameful,” the king said. “No one in the lineage of our family has ever gone begging. It’s against our family customs.”
“Your majesty,” the Buddha replied, “I now belong, not to the lineage of my family, but to the lineage of the noble ones. Theirs are the customs I follow.” Ajarn Mun devoted many years of his life to tracking those customs down. Born in 1870, the son of rice farmers in the northeastern province of Ubon, he was ordained as a monk in the provincial capital in 1892. At the time of his ordination, there were two broad types of Buddhism available in Thailand; Maha Nikkaya and the Dhammayut Movements.

The first can be called Customary Buddhism — the mores and rites handed down over the centuries from teacher to teacher with little, if any, reference to the Pali canon. For the most part, these customs taught monks to live a sedentary life in the village monastery, serving the local villagers as doctors or fortune tellers. Monastic discipline tended to be loose. Occasionally, monks would go on a pilgrimage they called “dhutanga” which bore little resemblance to the classic dhutanga practices. Instead, it was more an undisciplined escape valve for the pressures of sedentary life. Moreover, monks and lay people practiced forms of meditation that deviated from the path of tranquillity and insight outlined in the Pali canon. Their practices, called vichaa aakhom, or incantation knowledge, involved initiations and invocations used for shamanistic purposes, such as protective charms and magical powers. They rarely mentioned nirvana except as an entity to be invoked for shamanic rites. The second type of Buddhism available at the time, was Reform Buddhism, based on the Pali canon and begun in the 1820’s by Prince Mongkut, who later became King Rama IV (and still later was portrayed in the musical The King and I).

Prince Mongkut was ordained as a monk for twenty-seven years before ascending the throne. After studying the canon during his early years as a monk, he grew discouraged by the level of practice he saw around him in Thai monasteries. So he reordained among the Mons — an ethnic group that straddled the Thai-Burmese border and occupied a few villages across the river from Bangkok — and studied Vinaya and the classic dhutanga practices under the guidance of a Mon teacher. Later, his brother, King Rama III, complained that it was disgraceful for member of the royal family to join an ethnic minority, and so built a monastery for the Prince-Monk on the Bangkok side of the river. There, Mongkut attracted a small but strong following of like-minded monks and lay supporters, and in this way the Dhammayut (lit., In Accordance with the Dhamma) movement was born.

In its early years, the Dhammayut movement was an informal grouping devoted to Pali studies, focusing on Vinaya, the classic dhutanga practices, a rationalist interpretation of the Dhamma, and the revival of meditation techniques taught in the Pali canon, such as recollection of the Buddha and mindfulness of the body. None of the movement’s members, however, could prove that the teachings of the Pali canon actually led to enlightenment. Mongkut himself was convinced that the path to nirvana was no longer open, but he felt that a great deal of merit could be made by reviving at least the outward forms of the earliest Buddhist traditions. Formally taking a bodhisattva vow, he dedicated the merit of his efforts to future Buddhahood. Many of his students also took vows, hoping to become disciples of that future Buddha.

Upon disrobing and ascending the throne after his brother’s death in 1851, Rama IV was in a position to impose his reforms on the rest of the Thai Sangha, but chose not to. Instead, he quietly sponsored the building of new Dhammayut centers in the capital and the provinces, which was how — by the time of Ajarn Mun — there came to be a handful of Dhammayut monasteries in Ubon.
Ajarn Mun felt that Customary Buddhism had little to offer and so he joined the Dhammayut order, taking a student of Prince Mongkut as his preceptor. Unlike many who joined the order at the time, he wasn’t interested in the social advancement that would come with academic study and ecclesiastical appointments. Instead, his life on the farm had impressed on him the sufferings inherent in the cycle of life and death, and his single aim was to find a way out of the cycle. As a result, he soon left the scholarly environment of his preceptor’s temple and went to live with a teacher named Ajarn Sao Kantasilo (1861-1941) in a small meditation monastery on the outskirts of town.

Ajarn Sao was unusual in the Dhammayut order in that he had no scholarly interests but was devoted to the practice of meditation. He trained Ajarn Mun in strict discipline and canonical meditation practices, set in the context of the dangers and solitude of the wilderness. He could not guarantee that this practice would lead to the noble attainments, but he believed that it headed in the right direction.
After wandering for several years with Ajarn Sao, Ajarn Mun set off on his own in search of a teacher who could show him for sure the way to the noble attainments. His search took nearly two decades and involved countless hardships as he trekked through the jungles of Laos, central Thailand, and Burma, but he never found the teach
er he sought.

Gradually he realized that he would have to follow the Buddha’s example and take the wilderness itself as his teacher, not simply to conform to the ways of nature — for nature is samsara itself — but to break through to truths transcending them entirely. If he wanted to find the way beyond aging, illness, and death, he would have to learn the lessons of an environment where aging, illness, and death are thrown into sharp relief. At the same time, his encounters with other monks in the forest convinced him that learning the lessons of the wilderness involved more than just mastering the skills of physical survival.

 

He would also have to develop the acuity not to be misled by dead-end sidetracks in his meditation. So, with a strong sense of the immensity of his task, he returned to a mountainous region in central Thailand and settled alone in a cave.
In the long course of his wilderness training, Ajarn Mun learned that — contrary to Reform and Customary beliefs — the path to nirvana was not closed. The true Dhamma was to be found not in old customs or texts but in the well-trained heart and mind. The texts were pointers for training, nothing more or less. The rules of the Vinaya, instead of simply being external customs, played an important role in physical and mental survival. As for the Dhamma texts, practice was not just a matter of confirming what they said. Reading and thinking about the texts could not give an adequate understanding of what they meant — and did not count as showing them true respect. True respect for the texts meant taking them as a challenge: putting their teachings seriously to the test to see if, in fact, they are true. In the course of testing the teachings, the mind would come to many unexpected realizations that were not contained in the texts. These in turn had to be put to the test as well, so that one learned gradually by trial and error to the point of an actual noble attainment. Only then, Ajarn Mun would say, did one understand the Dhamma.

 

This attitude toward the Dhamma parallels what ancient cultures called “warrior knowledge” — the knowledge that comes from developing skills in difficult situations — as opposed to the “scribe knowledge” that people sitting in relative security and ease can write down in words. Of course, warriors need to use words in their training, but they view a text as authoritative only if its teachings are borne out in practice. The Canon itself encourages this attitude when it quotes the Buddha as teaching his aunt, “As for the teachings of which you may know, ‘These teachings lead to dispassion, not to passion; to being unfettered, not to being fettered; to divesting, not to accumulating; to modesty, not to self-aggrandizement; to contentment, not to discontent; to seclusion, not to entanglement; to aroused persistence, not to laziness; to being unburdensome, not to being burdensome’: You may definitely hold, ‘This is the Dhamma, this is the Vinaya, this is the Teacher’s instruction.'”
Thus the ultimate authority in judging a teaching is not whether the teaching can be found in a text. It lies in each person’s relentless honesty in putting the Dhamma to the test and carefully monitoring the results.
When Ajarn Mun had reached the point where he could guarantee that the path to the noble attainments was still open, he returned to the northeast to inform Ajarn Sao and then to continue wandering.

 

Gradually he began to attract a grassroots following. People who met him were impressed by his demeanor and teachings, which were unlike those of any other monks they had known. They believed that he embodied the Dhamma and Vinaya in everything he did and said. As a teacher, he took a warrior’s approach to training his students. Instead of simply imparting verbal knowledge, he put them into situations where they would have to develop the qualities of mind and character needed in surviving the battle with their own defilements. Instead of teaching a single meditation technique, he taught them a full panoply of skills — as one student said, “Everything from washing spittoons on up” — and then sent them into the wilds.
It was after Ajarn Mun’s return to the northeast that a third type of Buddhism emanating from Bangkok — State Buddhism — began to impinge on his life. In an effort to present a united front in the face of imperialist threats from Britain and France, Rama V (1868-1910) wanted to move the country from a loose feudal system to a centralized nation-state. As part of his program, he and his brothers — one of whom was ordained as a monk — enacted religious reforms to prevent the encroachment of Christian missionaries. Having received their education from British tutors, they created a new monastic curriculum that subjected the Dhamma and Vinaya to Victorian notions of reason and utility.

 

Their new version of the Vinaya, for instance, was a compromise between Customary and Reform Buddhism designed to counter Christian attacks that monks were unreliable and lazy. Monks were instructed to give up their wanderings, settle in established monasteries, and accept the new state curriculum. Because the Dhammayut monks were the best educated in Thailand at the time — and had the closest connections to the royal family — they were enlisted to do advance work for the government in outlying regions.
In 1928, a Dhammayut authority unsympathetic to meditation and forest wanderers took charge of religious affairs in the northeast. Trying to domesticate Ajarn Mun’s following, he ordered them to establish monasteries and help propagate the government’s program. Ajarn Mun and a handful of his students left for the north, where they were still free to roam. In the early 1930’s, Ajarn Mun was appointed the abbot of an important monastery in the city of Chieng Mai, but fled the place before dawn of the following day.

He returned to settle in the northeast only in the very last years of his life, after the local ecclesiastical authorities had grown more favorably disposed to his way of practice. He maintained many of his dhutanga practices up to his death in 1949.
It wasn’t until the 1950’s that the movement he founded gained acceptance in Bangkok, and only in the 1970’s did it come into prominence on a nationwide level. This coincided with a widespread loss of confidence in state monks, many of whom were little more than bureaucrats in robes. As a result, Kammatthana monks came to represent, in the eyes of many monastics and lay people, a solid and reliable expression of the Dhamma in a world of fast and furious modernization.
Buddhist history has shown that wilderness traditions go through a very quick life cycle.

 

As one loses its momentum, another often grows up in its place. But with the wholesale destruction of Thailand’s forests in the last few decades, the Kammatthana tradition may be the last great forest tradition that Thailand will produce. Fortunately, we in the West have learned of it in time to gather lessons that will be help in cultivating the customs of the noble ones on Western soil and establishing authentic wilderness traditions of our own.
Perhaps the most important of those lessons concerns the role that the wilderness plays in testing and correcting trends that develop among Buddhists in cities and towns. The story of the Kammatthana tradition gives lie to the facile notion that Buddhism has survived simply by adapting to its host culture. The survival of Buddhism and the survival of the Dhamma are two different things. People like Ajarn Mun — willing to make whatever sacrifices are needed to discover and practice the Dhamma on its own terms — are the ones who have kept the Dhamma alive.

Of course, people have always been free to engage in Buddhist traditions in whatever way they like, but those who have benefited most from that engagement are those who, instead of reshaping Buddhism to fit their preferences, reshape themselves to fit in with the customs and traditions of the noble ones. To find these customs isn’t easy, given the bewildering variety of traditions that Buddhists have spawned over the centuries. To test them, each individual is thrown back on his or her own powers of relentless honesty, integrity, and discernment.

There are no easy guarantees. And perhaps this fact in itself is a measure of the Dhamma’s true worth. Only people of real integrity can truly comprehend it. As Ajarn Lee, one of Ajarn Mun’s students, once said, “If a person isn’t true to the Buddha’s teachings, the Buddha’s teachings won’t be true to that person — and that person won’t be able to know what the Buddha’s true teachings are”.

Source; The Customs of the Noble Ones”, by Thanissaro Bhikkhu. Access to Insight (Legacy Edition), 7 June 2010, http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/authors/thaniss… ©1999 Thanissaro Bhikkhu


Presenting a close up look at a pristinely well preserved and rare Pra Khun Phaen Pong Prai Kumarn, with 6 code stamps on front face, and Pra Somdej indent on rear face, with bronze wanich and sai rae tong kam golden coating. This is a master class Khun Phaen of LP Tim, which won first prize trophy during the August 2561 BE LP Tim amulet competition of the Samakom Luead Ban Kaay Luang Phu Tim amulet association.

Pra Khun Phaen Pong Prai Kumarn Luang Por Tim

This Model is  Pra Khun Phaen pok Pim Niyom Sao Mee Sen, in Pink Prai Kumarn Powders with Sai rae Tong Kam golde  coating, 6 code stamps on front face, amd Pra Somdej coin impression indented into rear face.  this Amulet won first prize trophy during the highly esteemed Amulet competition of the Luead Ban Kaay Lp Tim Amulets association, for its impressive beauty and originality, in the category of Pra Khun Phaen with coin impressions in rear face.

Luang Phu Tim Issarigo, was of course not only one of the most highly acclaimed and sought after Guru Monks for his amulets in his lifetime, amd posthumously, but is also the holder of the highest esteem in Thai Buddhist amulet history for Pong Prai Kumarn powders. Luang Phu Tim, is Internationally Acclaimed, for his famous Pra Khun Phaen Pong Prai Kumarn, and Look Om powder balls. As to the classic ‘Rian’ type coin image amulets which have become all time favourites, and eternally, world famous classic amulets of the high end variety. His rian Jaroen Porn, and Rian Nakprok Paed Rorp are amongst the most highly sought after coin amulets of all.


An exquisitely beautiful Pra Khun Phaen Prai Kumarn 2515 BE Pim Yai Niyom Block Tong Hlueang (Block 2) Hlang Dtok Dtaeng Niyom Nuea Chompoo with Khaw Hniaw Suk & Pong Prai Kumarn Ta Bronze Wanich Dtem Ongk, code Sala (crown code stamp), code 3, and quadruple code Pidta embossed on the front face, with the indented image of a Rian Pra Somdej Lor LP Tim embossed into the rear face as an indentation.


Rian Glom Lek 2505 BE Por Tan Klai Wajasit (2)

Presenting a tiny but powerful and rare classic amulet from one of the Great Khao Or Masters of the 20th Century, Rian Glom Lek Hlang Chedi 2505 BE Nuea Tong Daeng Miniature Guru Monk Coin Por Tan Klai Wajasit

This Sacred amulet of the Great Khao Or Master of Nakorn Sri Tammarat, Master of Wat San Khan and Wat Pratat Noi, is a very rare amulet from Por Tan Klai’s 2505 BE Blessing Ceremony Edition, and is considered a ‘Jaek mae Krua’ type amulet (meaning ‘give to the kitchen maids and temple helpers’), which is suitable not only for men, but due to its miniature size, a perfect amulet for ladies or children to wear.

Rian Glom Lek 2505 BE Por Tan Klai Wajasit

Rian Glom Lek 2505 BE Por Tan Klai Wajasit Wat Suan Khan

The 2505 BE edition of amulets of Por Tan Klai, is a highly preferred edition, which saw his famous ‘Rian Glom’ round Monk coin amulet with Chakra released, The Rian Glom Lek Hlang Chedi, and the Roop Tai Por Tan Klai Guru Monk Blesséd Photographamulets such as look om chan hmak and ya sen tobacco balls, and sacred powder amulets of various models.


A very rare and highly prized amulet for the devotees of Por Tan Klai to associate with his image and pray to him with a blessed image of the Guru, and the Chedi Relic Stupa on rear face for Buddhanussati and Marananussati. A powerful and Sacred amulet which has passed through the hands of the Guru and been blessed by him.

Por Tan Klai was one of the Top Guru Master Monks of the Last Century, and is considered one of the Four Great Masters of the Previous Generation of Lineage Masters of the Khao Or Southern Sorcery Lineage.

Kata Bucha Por Tan Klai

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A Powerful Gurunussati Type Amulet, the Sacred Roop Tai Ad Grajok ‘mirror press’ version Olden Days Photograph of, the Great Guru Master Luang Por Opasi, Legendary Miracle Monk of of Asrom Bang Mot released in the year 2507 BE.

Roop Tai (Photos) were and still are one of the most direct ways in which a Devotee can connect with and revere to receive blessings from a chosen Guru master, and are a highly favored type of Sacred Amulet with Thai Buddhist People. Original Photos blessed by the olden days masters are of course also very rare and original. This photograph is double sided (Ad Grajok), and features the image of Luang Por Opasi standing on a pedestal with his hands raised in prayer, during the Ngan Piti Song Nam Luang Por Opasi bathing ceremony of 2507 BE at Asrom Bang Mot.

Roop Tai (Photos) were and still are one of the most direct ways in which a Devotee can connect with and revere to receive blessings from a chosen Guru master, and are a highly favored type of Sacred Amulet with Thai Buddhist People. Original Photos blessed by the olden days masters are of course also very rare and original.

Luang Por Opasi was born in 2441 BE, in Nakorn Sri Tammarat, but was taken and placed in charge of the Sangkaracha at the Royal Temple of Wat Bowornives in Bangkok, where he remained studying and was finally ordained as a full Bhikkhu, in 2461 BE at the age of 20, at Wat Bovornives.

He was ordained by the Sangkaracha Monk himself, as his Upachaya (Ordaining Officer). He studied Pali and Dhamma to reach the academic level of Prayoke 5, and then turned to study and practice Wicha Akom (Buddha Magic and Sorcery). He continued on there to attain his completion of Dhamma Studies and develop all facets of his practice, and finally, after 20 years serving at Wat Bowornives, he decided to begin Tudong Solitary Forest Wandering.

He spent the next 20 years wandering and learning Wicha with various Guru Masters throughout this time. One of the masters he spent the most time with to absorb the methods of empowerment and formulas, was Luang Por Gop, of Wat Khao Sariga in Nakorn Nayok. He spent a long time with this Master in order to develop the special abilities of Dtecho Kasin (Fire Kasina), and to stare at the flames and meditate to vanquish the restless mind, and to overcome material attachment.

Part of this practice, was to burn any possessions or material offerings given in the fire, and to watch them burn, until the Kilesa (selfish instinct and desires and attachments) cease to arise within the heart. After mastering his own heart, he returned to Wat Bowornives. But after some time, with his practice of burning all thing he was given, except the four requisites of food, medicine, clothing and lodging necessities, began to cause devotees to begin to travel from far and wide to pay reverence to Luang Por Opasi at Wat Bowornives, and this seemed unfitting to Luang Por Opasi, who did not wish to attract attention

Below; front cover of Amulets of LP Opasi Encyclopaedic Catalog

Amulets of LP Opasi Encyclopaedic Catalog

So he decided it was time to leave Wat Bowornives, and travel on Tudong to go stay at Bang Mot, but this was to no avail, because the devotees just followed after him to Bang Mot, and slowly but surely he was receiving many devotees again. The local folk of Bang Mot had also become very faifhtful devotees of Luang Por Opasi, and had built a small Samnak Songk (name of a Buddhist Forest Ashram before it becomes officially a registered temple) for Luang Por to reside in permanently.

From then on, Luang Por remained at Asrom Bang Mot, and developed it into a fully fledged temple, with his fold of devotees ranging from the poorest farmer, to the richest noble, all of whome came to give alms and watch those gifts which were not of the 4 requisites be burned in Luang Por Opasi’s fire. Everybody who came to have material possessions burned in the fire, would experience great wealthy fortunes thereafter, and the legend of Luang Por Opasi’s Powers began to circulate.

Luang Por Opasi was also very famous for his ability to appear in more than one place at the same time, and be seen by witnesses in both places. There is a Legend of a visit to India where Luang Por Opasi was supposed to appear, and he sent his two apprentice monks to travel ahead, saying he would appear there later.

In 2499 BE (1955), LP Opasi and two of his disciples where invited to a Buddhist gathering in India to be held from October 28. LP Opasi called to his two disciples to leave before him and that he would join them later. He also told them that he will not be on the spot before October 31 and to warn the organizers of his delay and the date of its arrival. October 31 many of his disciples went to the airport to wish LP Opasi a happy voyage, but it did not come, a few days later the death of LP Opasi was announced.

In fact, in the evening, LP Opasi warned his monks that he was going to remain in meditation several days and to not disturb him under any circumstance, then he went in his Kuti. He stayed there until a anxious monk decides to go and see whether LP Opasi were well or not, he enters the Kuti to find LP Opasi in a state having all the aspect of death.

During this time, in India, the two disciples of LP Opasi attended the Buddhist gathering in company of LP Opasi. Luang Por Opasi spoke with many other Buddhists dignitaries and gave even a state education in front of several hundreds of people, even photos of this occasion has being taken. LP Opasi said goodbye to its two disciples, and told them that he was going to return to Thailand only by separate means of transport.

Luang Por Opasi Mendicant Monk

When they arrived the disciples had a hard time believing the news of LP Opasis Passing Away, everyone believed that they had become insane when they said to have spent the last days in his company… Only the testimony of several other monks present and the photographs in India of LP Opasi proved the veracity of their incredible history.

 

Each year the coffin of LP Opasi is opened, his body has not decomposed and his finger nails and hair is cut. This is a common thing regarding monks that have become enlightened, The body will not decompose or if the body is burned the bones will turn to stone or diamond.

(extra info: The great master of Sak Yant Luang Por Phern (Wat Bang Pra) was a student of Luang Por Opasi)

Luang Por Opasi Kata for Chanting;

Ithisukhathoe Arahang Puttoe Namoe Puttaaya Bpatawee Kongkaa Phrapoom Taewaa Khamaamihang

Prakam 108 Met Nuea Mai Saksit Dtid Rian Kroo Ba Gaew 2520 BE – a Sacred wooden bead Blessėd Rosary with Guru Monk coin, from the great Lanna Monk, Kroo Ba Gaew Sutto, of Wat Doi Mokkhala, in Chiang Mai. Serm Duang (Good Karma) Maha Mongkol (Auspicious Blessings), Klaew Klaad (Evade Dangers), Maha Lap (Lucky Fortunes)

The rosary has a 2520 BE Rian Roop Muean Guru Monk Coin with the image of Kroo Ba Gaew gazing sideways on the front face, and a Sacred Nam Tao Yantra with Khom Agkhara on the rear face. A highly recommendable item for Buddhanussati and Gurunussati, Meditation, Prayer Counting, Protection and Mercy Charm. Wear as a necklace with amulet of the Guru. and use for counting your prayers and Kata Chants.

Luang Phu Kroo Ba Gaew was trained in his early ordination under the lineage of Luang Phu Mun Puritatto, and is one of the great Kroo Ba Ajarn of the Northern Lanna Region, who was a very close companion of the Great Luang Phu Hwaen Sujjino, of Wat Doi Mae Pang.

 

Luang Phu Kroo Ba Gaew has somewhat of a mysterious past, because his biography was never officially documented, and Kroo Ba Gaew himself was not prone to talk about himself very much. This of course common with High Arya Sangha who have practiced and attained inner peace, and is in itself a sign of great attainments. Sadly however, this results in little being known about his early life as a monk in the lineage of Luang Phu Mun, leaving us with only a partial knowledge of his Biography.

 

But the miracles of this Great Monk have been told and retold over many decades, and by word of mouth, Kroo Ba Gaew became a Great Kroo Ba Ajarn of the region, on the merits of Miracles made. It is said, that once during the time Kroo Ba Gaew was still living, a Naga Serpent came up from the underworld near the temple, and was run over by a truck as it slithered across the road, and was hurt. The Naga crawled up to the temple and called Luang Phu Kroo Ba Gaew to come out and heal him with holy water.

Another famous legend is the tale of the three Buddha images in the Mae Nam Ping river, which were embedded in the stream. Luang Phu Kroo Ba Gaew performed a ceremony to invite them to rise up from the waters to perform miracles for humanity, and come to reside at the temple.

 

The statues rose up from the depths and were able to be transported to the temple, where they reside to this day. It is said these Buddhas can make the rain fall in the proper season to make the crops grow, which is a matter of life and death from many farming communities in the region. The Buddhas are hence extremely sacred for the local devotees, and Kroo Ba Gaew’s miracle of calling them, is perhaps his most famous legend.

 

Luang Phu Kroo Ba Gaew’s amulets are extremely rare, because he never ever really focused on making amulets of many kinds. he would only release mainly Buddhist amulets such as his monk coins, and ‘Roop Tai’ blessėd monk photos, and items of reverence and practice such as the Prakam Saksit Blessėd Rosary. Devotees of Kroo Ba Gaew like to wear his rosaries with one of his coin amulets attached for prayer and protection of the Guru. HIs devotees are very reluctant to part with their amulets of Luang Phu Kroo Ba Gaew, for they believe them to possess very powerful protection, and bring auspicious blessings.

 

The Wongarn Pra Krueang Lanna Northern Amulet Appreciation Society have registered the pantheon of amulets of Kroo Ba Gaew as residing within the Dtamrap Pra Krueang Lanna Yord Niyom ‘Top List of Most Preferred Amulets of the Lanna Region’.

Use the Traditional Thai Buddhist Method for Bucha;

1. Chant Maha Namasakara (3 Times)

2. Chant the Trai Soranakom (3 Times)

3. Chant Kata Aaraatanaa Pra Krueang (3 Times)

Kata Maha Namasakara

Namo Dtat-Sa Pakawa-Dto Araha-Dto Sam-Maa Sam-Put-Dtat-Sa

Namo Dtat-Sa Pakawa-Dto Araha-Dto Sam-Maa Sam-Put-Dtat-Sa

Namo Dtat-Sa Pakawa-Dto Araha-Dto Sam-Maa Sam-Put-Dtat-Sa

 

Trai Soranakom

Puttang Cheewidtang Yaawa Nipaanang Saranang Kajchaami

Tammang Cheewidtang Yaawa Nipaanang Saranang Kajchaami

Sangkang Cheewidtang Yaawa Nipaanang Saranang Kajchaami

Tudtiyambpi Puttang Cheewidtang Yaawa Nipaanang Saranang Kajchaami

Tudtiyambpi Tammang Cheewidtang Yaawa Nipaanang Saranang Kajchaami

Tudtiyambpi Sangkang Cheewidtang Yaawa Nipaanang Saranang Kajchaami

Dtadtiyambpi Puttang Cheewidtang Yaawa Nipaanang Saranang Kajchaami

Dtadtiyambpi Tammang Cheewidtang Yaawa Nipaanang Saranang Kajchaami

Dtadtiyambpi Sangkang Cheewidtang Yaawa Nipaanang Saranang Kajchaami

 

Kata Aaraatana Pra Krueang

Puttang Aaraatanaanang

Tammang Aaraatanaanang

Sangkang Aaraatanaanang

Puttang Prasittimae

Tammang Prasittimae

Sangkang Prasittimae

 

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