Luang Por Dam

A Rare Loi Ongk Pra Pid Ta Thaan Sung (high Dais) Buddha Image Statuette amulet, in Nuea Pong Kluk Rak, with hand inscribed Yant Putto, and Khom Inscriptions, from the Great Luang Por Dam, of Wat Mai Nopparam, in Naratiwat Province, in the deep South of Thailand on the Malay border. Luang Por Dam was the first apprentice in the Wicha of Pra Pid Ta Magic, to the Great Luang Por Kron, of Wat Bang Sae. This exhibit differs from many, in the fact that it has had red Rak Chart Jeen Boran coated on the base.

Phra Pidta Luang Por Dam Wat Mai Nopparam15

The Pid Ta is made using the very same Muan Sarn Sacred Powders admixture, empowerment, and inscriptions, as those of the Great Luang Por Kron, and the Pra Pid Ta of Luang Por Dam himself, have now become legendary in their own right, and stand alone on their own merits as Pra Niyom master Class Category amulets.

 

LP Dam Wat Mai Nopparam

Highly revered and collected by Looksit (Devotees) of his Mentor Luang Por Kron, a Buddhist Master Monk from Malaysia. Luang Por Kron was Abbot of Wat Bang Sae in the province of Kalantan.

He made many Pid Ta amulets which were so very preferred (‘Niyom’). It is said in Thai Amulet circles that, in the same way that we prefer the Pra Somdej Wat Rakang as a Niyom amulet, so, in Malaysia and even Singapore, the Pra Pid Ta of Luang Por Dam, and his Mentor Luang Por Kron, became just as sought after and beloved. Malaysians know Luang Por Dam very well, for his temple is very close to the Malaysian border in Naratiwat, which is one of the reasons LP Dam was able to be a close accomplice of LP Kron, and receive and continue his Wicha.

Rear Face Pra Pid Ta Luang Por Dam

The Pra Pid Ta amulets of Luang Por Dam of Wat Mai Nopparam, have become ever more comparable and popular to those of his Mentor and Wicha Inheritance Kroo Ba Ajarn Luang Por Kron, for the fact that Luang Por Kron’s amulets are almost impossible to find anymore these days, and the Pra Pid Ta of Luang Por Dam have hence become the favored alternative, for they are considered to possess the magic of both Masters.

Below; Luang Por Kron – Wat Uttamaram (Kalimantan Malaysia)

Luang Por Kron of Wat Uttamaram Malaysia
As to Luang Por Dam’s Mentor, LP Kron, Malaysian Buddhists do not often call him Luang Por Kron as Thai people do, rather ‘Tok Racha‘, which means something similar to Thailand’s top Royal Monk always being called ‘Pra Sangkaracha’.

It is said that despite the fact that most of the surrounding households in the vicinity of Luang Por Krons temple were Muslim, that he earned their respect, and was an honored person. He was not called Luang Por Kron by Malays, as we call him in Thailand, rather, was named ‘Tok Raja’, which means ‘ as equal to the Sangha Raja’ .

The reason for this comes from a legend that the daughter of a powerful Sultan of Kalantan was cursed with a black magic spell, which caused his mind to become strangely affected, and even doctors and psychologists could not help to cure him, and even the Muslim witch doctors could not break the spell with their magic.

But Luang Por Kron was able to heal her, and return her to sanity. This caused LP Kron to recieve great respect from the Sultan who then gave him the honorary name of Tok Raja. His most preferred amulets are the Pra Pid Ta, which were mostly hand made molds, in Muan Sarn Sacred Powders with Lacquer (Nuea Pong Kluk Rak), some very few in carved wood, and a very few are sometimes seen in carved ivory.

Pra Pidta Luang Por Dam Nuea Pong Jarn Yant Putto


Luang Por Kron began making Pra Pid Ta amulets sometime around the year 2480 BE onwards, mostly making hand molded clay models, resulting in each one having a very original appearance, some with very wide legs, others less so. Most were made in Nuea Pong Kluk Rak herbal powders with lacquer mixed into the clay, and hand molded, to form an inimitable effect that has made his Pra Pid Ta amulets so original in design.

Many of his hand molded Pid Ta do not have a dais and have very wide legs, whereas others have a more standard form with inscription, and less wide legs, and usually with inscriptions of Unalome and Yant on the surface of the image. His other highly preferred amulets among devotees, are the Rian Roop Dork Jik 1st edition coin of 2500 BE, and the second edition coin, the Rian Roop Khai of 2505 BE.

How to Chant Kata Pra Pid Ta

A Top Master-Class amulet, from LP Dam, first apprentice of Malaysia’s Greatest Master of the Wicha Pra Pid Ta

The Pid Ta can be used as a Loi Ongk Statuette on the altar for Bucha, or be worn as an amulet encased. This exhibit is highly recommended to use for altar worship, as it has a wide sturdy base, and is fitting for placement on flat surfaces.


Authenticity Certificate Pra Somdej Hlang Yant Ha Nuea Wan Plai Dam 3 Takrut LP Tim

An Authenticated and Certificated Pra Somdej Hlang Yant Trai Pim Pised Fang Takrut Sam Kasat Fang Roop Muean Nuea Ngern – Muan Sarn Sacred Powders amulet of the Great LP Tim, in Nuea Pong Prai Kumarn Bone Powders, with Pong Wan Plai Dam Black Earthen Powders, Gesa Monk’s Hairs of LP Tim, triple Takrut spell inserts, in bronze, silver and gold (3 Kings/Sam Kasat), and a solid gold Roop Muean Bpam image of Luang Phu Tim. The front face has an immensely clear image with refined details and deep relief, which is unusually prominent for this Pim, adding to its inherent prominence, due to being an Ongk Kroo model with triple Takrut in front face, and solid gold Roop Muean inserted in rear face, as well as being made from the much rarer Nuea Wan Plai Dam.

Pra Somdej Hlang Yant Ha Nuea Wan Plai Dam 3 Takrut LP Tim

This Pra Somdej is extremely rare to find in black Wan Plai Dam powders, and especially in Ongk Kroo version. They are well prized for their Maha Lap and Maha Sanaeh, and Kong Grapan Powers, especially an exhibit such as this pristinely kept amulet, enchanting in its appearance, with the seductive shimmer of Sai Rae Tong Kam Pure Gold Flakes, filled with Pong Prai Kumarn Muan Sarn Powders. The special individuaity and Sacred Power of this amulet is enhanced by the Triple Takrut spells imbuing extra power, and the solid gold image of LP Tim on the rear face.

 Luang Phu Tim Issarigo, of Wat Laharn Rai, was renowned during his day, and remains just as highly renowned today, as one of the top Master Monks in Thai amulet making history, and as the master of the Wicha Pong Prai Kumarn. His amulets are highly varied, and more extensive than ever thought before, now that the pantheon is becoming fully documented, and authenticated. Luang Phu Tim Issarigo, was of course not only one of the most highly acclaimed and sought after Guru Monks for his amulets, he is the holder of the highest esteem in Thai Buddhist amulet history for Pong Prai Kumarn powders.


Pra Somdej Hlang Yant Ha Nuea Wan Plai Dam 3 Takrut Gold Image LP Tim

The amulet is full of Pong Prai Kumarn with Plai Dam Powders, and has all features intact, having been kept in pristine condition by its original owner The Sacred Pra Pong Prai Kumarn of the Great Luang Phu Tim of Wat Laharn Rai is one of the most famous amulets of all time, and highly renowned for its true power to bring prosperity and good business, power of attraction and mercy charm to the wearer.

The Pra Somdej is rare to find in black Wan Plai Dam powders, known for their Maha Lap and Maha Sanaeh, and Kong Grapan Powers, especially an exhibit such as this pristinely kept amulet, enchanting in its appearance, with the seductive shimmer of Sai Rae Tong Kam Pure Gold Flakes, filled with Pong Prai Kumarn Muan Sarn Powders. The amulet has Luang Phu Tim’s inimitable and semi-ubiquitous Yant Trai Sacred Geometry Spell in Ancient Khmer ‘Pasa Khom‘ Pali Sanskrit Agkhara Sacred Script on the rear face, which is what lends the name ‘Somdej Hlang Yant Trai’ or Yant Maha Ud’ (Gunstopper Yantra), to the amulet.

Once seen as less known as the other famous Masters of his time such as Luang Por Horm, Luang Por Rung of Wat Ta Graber, and Luang Por Chern. LP Tim soon became more popular and powerful as the tale of him being the only Master able to make an amulet rise up in a water filled alms-bowl and start spinning around, when put to the test with the other great Masters, in a privately held competition of magical powers.

Since his passing, his devotees and apprenticed monks, have now become the world’s top living masters for the making of Pra Khun Phaen Pong Pra Kumarn, and literally dozens of encyclopedic books, have been printed, documenting both this great master monk, and his classic amulets of high esteem. The amulets of Lang Phu Tim have resided, among of the most popular amulets in the whole Pantheon of Thai Buddhist Amulets of the last century, and indeed, of all time. The amulets of Luang Phu Tim, are now almost impossible to encounter commonly anywhere in any amulet emporium, except for the most elite showrooms, and usually at a very elevated price.

The reason the Pong Prai Kumarn amulets of Luang Phu Tim became so world famous and popular, even in the time when Luang Phu Tim was still alive, is because everybody who owned one, recounted that business and personal success and prosperity had increased constantly and steadily since wearing the amulet.

Kata Luang Phu Tim  Wat Laharn Rai

Encyclopaedic work of the amulets of the Great Luang Phu Tim Issarigo of Wat Laharn Rai


Pra Upakut BE Wat Pra Singh

The Pra Kring Upakut Muang Ngay Loi Ongk Statuette Buddha was released in the year 2512 BE, at Wat Pra Singh, in Chiang Mai, North Thailand. The Pra Kring Upakut was cast and forged in Sacred Chanuan Alloy, along with the equally famed and sought-after Pra Ruang Rang Pern, Rian Somdej Pra Naresuan Maharaj Royal King Coin, and Pra Chayawat Naresuan amulets. At that time, the blessing ceremony for these amulets became the largest mass blessing ceremony of Northern Thai Lanna Amulet History, funded and organised by Commanding Police officer, and Mayor of Chiang Mai Province, Pan Tamruaj Aek Nirand Chaynam. In addition, His Majest King Bhumipol Adulyadej Rama 9 attended the ceremony to perform the ‘Te Tong’ gold pouring ceremony part of the forging ritual of the amulets.

Pra Upaku (Pra Bua Khem) 2512 BE Wat Pra Singh

Many Great Master Monks from around Thailand were invited to come and assist in the empowerment and blessing of the amulets, which were made in order to raise funds to build the Pra Naresuan Stupa Chedi Reliquary as a Memorial Monument to the first King of Thailand, who united the Kingdoms of the various city states to defeat the Burmese, and unite the nation. Once the funds were raised after release of the amulets, a Chedi Stup was built dedicated to King Naresuan Maharaj, at Mueang Ngay In Chiang Daw, as a monument of the city. The statuettes were made from Nava Loha (9 Sacred Metals), in numbers of 2512 amulets only, making these amulets extremely rare to find in the present day. The Grand Putta Pisek (Buddha Abhiseka), was performed on the 15th January 2512 BE at the Worawiharn Pra Singh Wora Maha Wiharn shrine-room in Chiang Mai.

Rear Face Pra Upakut Wat Pra Singh 2512 BE Ble4ssed by 40 Great Master Monks

Among the great number of 40 Powerful Master-Monks present to empower the amulets in the Putta Pisek ceremony, were; Oor Tan Klai of Wat Suan Khan, Luang Por Nam of Wat Don Sala, Luang Phu To of Wat Pradoo Chimplee, Luang Por Nor, of Wat Ta Ruea, Luang Por Tiam, of Wat Gasatrirat, Luang Por Tong Yoo, of Wat Mai Nong Pra Ongk, Luang Por Tiang, of Wat Khao Roop Chang, Luang Por Pring, of Wat Bote Goeng Tanu, Kroo Ba Wang, of Wat Ban Den, Luang Por Chaem, of Wat Wang Daeng Nuea, Luang Por Chern, of Wat Dtamnak Nuea, Luang Por Mueang of Wat Ta Haen, and the great Luang Por Tim, of Wat Chang Hai.

Kata Bucha Pra Upakut - Pra Bua Khem Buddhist Chanting Tutorial

For this reason, this edition of mulets is seen as highly sacred and powerful, for the blessings of these Great Masters and many others, with a powerful and Grand Ritual Ceremony. The Pra Kring Naresuan, Upakut, are seen as the number one Pra Kring amulets of the Lanna Region of this Era. The Pra Kring Naresuan is known around the Nation for its power and sacred blessings, and rarity, and is revered, and soigh-after by many Thai Buddhist People. Although for most, this is a mere hope and dream, for the chances of encountering one, are far and few between, due to the small numbers made of each amulet.
Base of Pra Upakut Amulet Wat Pra Singh

Pra Ajarn Sawai (Abbot of Wat Racha Nadda in Bangkok), was the Monk presiding over the Putta Pisk Ceremony. Before the Forging of the Sacred Chanuan Metallic Alloys, and Casting of the amulets, a host of Gold, Silver and Bronze Yantra Foils were inscribed with Magical Spells in both KHom and Agkhara Lanna script, within ancient Sacred Geometry designs, which were distributed to the most powerful monks around the Nation, and blessed during a whole year, before returning them to Wat Pra Singh, for the forging ceremony, to empower the Sacred Chanuan Metals. T.ese Yantra Foild were smelted together with many other kinds of Sacred Metallic Artifacts,

Amulet Pantheon released in this edition;

  • 1. Pra Kring Naresuan Mueang Ngay Nuea Nava Loha (2512 Made). 2 different models were made, the Pim Dto, and the Pim Yom
  • 2. Pra Kring Naresuan Mueang Ngay Pim Pised special model (9 made)
  • 3. Pra Chayawat Naresuan Mueang Ngay Nuea Nava Loha (2512 made)
  • 4. Pra Ruang Rang Pern Nuea Tong Daeng Rom Dam (95,000 made)
  • 5. Pra Ruang Rang Rang Pern Pimp Hlang Baeb (2 sided version), which were made in numbers of only 2000 amulets.

Rian Somdej Naresuan Maharat Nuea Tong Daeng Rom Dam, and Nuea Tong Daeng Phiw Fai (100,000 made, with much less being made in Nuea Tong Daeng Rom Dam, making these versions rarer).

Pra Upaku (Pra Kring Opakut 2512 BE Wat Pra Singh Chiang Mai

There were also the following models released for donation to the 33rd Regimental Army Legion;

  • 1. Pra Putta Sihingk 5, 7, 9, and 12 inch wide lap Bucha Statues. These Bucha statues were made in 2 different Sacred Chanuan substances 1. Nuea Sam Gasat (Gold, Silver and Bronze), and in Nuea Samrit (Bronze Alchemical Alloy)(, which were only made in limited numbers, according to how many pre orders were made.
  • 2. Pra Put Chiang Saen Singh Bucha Statue 5 inches wide lap in Nuea Sam Kasat.
  • 3. Badtr Nam Pra Putta Mont in Nuea Tong Daem Rom Dam Blackened Copper Alloy, composed of a Holy Water Bowl, Embellished Lid, with a Pra Kring Upakut Buddha amulet embeded within the Holy Water Bowl. There were two different kinds of lids made for the Badtr Nam Mont; 1. With Pra Kring inserted 2. With Lotus Flower Embossed. Only 100 of these Sacred Holy Water-Making bowls were made in total.
  • 4. Pra Kring Upakut, in Nuea Tong Lueang Rom Dam Sacred Brass Alchemicl Blackened Alloy.
  • 5. Pra Sivali 2 Inch High Statuettes, in Nuea Tong Lueang Sacred Brass.
  • 6. Rian Pra Jao Kawila in Nuea Tong Daeng Rom Dam.

This model is one of the rarer models to find, as they belonged to the special set set apart for donation to Thai Official Officers of the Regimental Army, and so very few ever fell out of the possession of the people who received one from the temple, allowing serious devotees and collectors to be able to obtain one.


Pidta Luang Por Toh Pim Jumbo 2

Proudly presenting a classic Masterpiece Amulet of World Famous International Fame and Acclaim, the Pra Pid Ta Maha Lap Jumbo Hlang Yant Duang Amulet, with Takrut insert in Nuea Gaesorn (Sacred Pollen Powders), from the Great and Inimitable Luang Phu To, of Wat Pradoo Chimplee.

 

This model is ‘Chae Nam Montr’ (Received Prayer Water Spray and Immersion), which gives the Sacred Powders of the amulet a special fluffy texture, and white mildew. This exhibit exudes Sacred Power with the visible presence of plentiful quantity of Gesa hairs of the Great Master-Monk LP To, which should always be present in greater or lesser proportions with his Pra Pidta Amulets

free ems worldwideFree EMS Shipping Worldwide is included with this amulet. The Pra Pid ta Jumbo 2 amulets were Released in 2523 BE, after three years of consecutive (Traimas) Buddha Abhiseka Ceremonies, with empowerment from Luang Phu To, who presided over all three Blessing Ceremonies between 2521-2523 BE, with many other great monks in attendance during the ceremonies, and the solo empowerment of LP To during the whole 3 years.

The empowerment sessions occurred between 2521 BE, and 2523 BE. Luang Phu would also empower the amulets in his Kuti Hut every night he was at the temple even between the Rainy Season Trimesters each year, spraying them with Holy Water blessings. The Pid Ta Maha Lap Jumbo Amulet was made in various Block Mold pressings, with the first and second block being the most documented.

The first block has pointy feet, with no toes detailed and more outward pointing earlobes, whereas the block 2 has highly defined toes and upward pointing soles in three dimensional details, with a raised line traveling over the left foot joint of the meditating Buddha Image.

The surface of the Sacred Powders of the Votive Tablet, are highly distinguished and evidently authentic Sacred Powders of Luang Phu To Wat Pradoo Chimplee – the amulet has very clear features, and respectable aging features to the Muan Sarn. The rear face has the Yant Duang Yai round sacred Yantra Embossed on the surface

This Pid Ta is a Pra Niyom Category Amulet (Preferred Master Class Status), and belongs to the Classic Preferred Editions which were blessed and released at Wat Pradoo Chimplee. There are many other Pra Pid Ta amulets from this great master which were released in other smaller temples, some of which are more affordable, and others are also rare and highly revered and worshiped.

Before making a choice with Pra Niyom amulets from World Famous Masters, it is important to study, and know which editions and which block mold pressings are the preferred amulets, in order to know which ones are carry a higher price tag and which ones a lower price. In principle, any amulet blessed by the same Master should be equally powerful and Sacred. However, the Pra Pid Ta 2521 – 2523 BE three year Blessings series is of course, for those whose budgets can afford it, a most recommendable amulet for both protection and wealth.

The Pra Pid ta Jumbo 2 is also very useful for Practitioners of Buddhism, as Buddhanussati Buddhist Remembrance to practice the Mindfulness Taught by the Buddha, and especially useful meditation amulet for those who are practicing Dhyana Meditation, and seeking Nirodha, the extinguishing of all suffering.

 

meditating Buddha or Yogi entering into the state of Nirodha, and covering its orifices, which represents the stilling of all the perceptions of the outer world through looking within, and closing all the senses to the outer disturbances, and entering the 4th state of absorption known as Arupa Jhana, where no suffering or excitement of heart is present.

However, due to certain editions having Miraculous Events in the News making them more famous and popular, as well as the Collectorship Scene and the Appreciation Societies who Value and Catalogue the various editions, have caused certain models and series editions to become extremely expensive for their Master Class Status.

Below; The ‘gesa’ (Hairs) of Luang Phu To are visible in the Muan Sarn Sacred Powders of the amulet. this is an essential aspect of investigating the Muan sarn of Luang Phu To Pra Pid Ta amulets, which always have a certain quantity of the hair of Luang Phu To in their mixture and visible on the surface to greater or lesser extent.

It is therefore not necessary for somebody who merely seeks a powerful amulet, to buy the more expensive models, and with a bit of effort to study and make wise decisions, one should choose always what is within one’s own budget.

For those who seek a Sacred Powerful Amulet blessed by this Master, there are many more affordable alternative editions to the Pra Niyom Master Class editions, which we hope to provide ever increasingly along with detailed explanations of each edition and series, so that you can distinguish the differences and make your choices accordingly.

A Takrut spell is inserted into the base of the amulet. A defined ridge is seen where the legs cross at the ankle lines. The Sangkati Sash drapes over the left forearm of the Buddha Image with clearly defined lines, and blends with the chest in subtle fashion. The fingers are clearly defined and elongated.

The surface of the Muan Sarn Sacred Powders has developed a very fluffy texture from the Holy Water sprayed over it, increasing the beauty of the amulet, which is a classic effect of the changing humidities of the atmosphere, and this has given the amulet is distinguished look of authenticity.

Those who seek Sacredness but do not wish to speculate on increasing value, or enter into show competitions for first prize, do not need to spend their money on a Master Class Level Series Amulet, rather, can seek alternatives blessed by the same Master at lower price. Diligent study and research will assist you in making the wise choice according to your personal wishes and needs.

Luang Phu To of Wat Pradoo Chimplee was one of the greatest Masters of the Last Century, and a Highly revered Monk around the whole Kingdom of Thailand. he was Respected and revered by His Majesty Our great King, who was a close friend and companion.

Below; the Gesa (hairs) of the Great Monk, are visibly present in high proportion within the Muan Sarn Sacred Powder Clay of the amulet.

His Majesty Attends Luang Phu To

This Great Monk achieved his status through his Great deeds and his great Diligence in his Patipatā (Practice of Purity and Renunciation), and in his Great Attainments in Dhamma Pariyatti and Dhamma Patipatā. Luang Phu To was born on the 27th March 2429 BE in Ban Klong Bang Noi in Samutr Prakarn and passed away on 5th March 2524 BE. His many honorable awards of status reflect his great practice and diligence, since beginning to studdy the Dhamma Vinaya at Wat Pradoo as a Samanera Novice monk, through to become the Bishop of the Ta Pra Municipality (2463 BE), to becoming awarded the charge of being the Pra Kroo Sangka Wichit for the Abbot of Wat Maha Tat in 2457 BE.

In 2463 BE, Luang Phu To became ascended to the status of Pra Kroo Sanya Badtr Chan Dtri (Third Level, tantamount to Batchelor of Arts in Dhamma). In 2497 BE, Luang Phu then became promoted to Pra Kroo Sana Badtr Chan Toe (Second Level, tantamount to a Doctorate in Dhamma), of Royal Category. In the year 2500 BE, Luang Phu was then given the additional status of Upachaya Ordaining Officer.

In the year 2506 BE, Luang Phu attained the status of Pra Kroo Sanya Badtr Chan Ek (tantamount to a Masters Degree in Dhamma). In 2510 BE Luang Phu To was given the charge of being the Gammagarn treasurer of the Temples of Ta Pra Minicipality.Then, in 2511 BE, Luang Phu To was promoted once more to Pra Kroo Chan Kroo Pised (tantamount to an Honors degree in Dhamma).

In 2516 Luang Phu became Pra Racha Kana (Royal Appointment Sangha Comittee) and head officer of the General Affairs of Vipassana Practice. In 2521, Luang Phu To received the status of Pra Racha Kana Chan Rach (tantamount to being an Archbishop of the Royal Decree). His Blessings are believed to possess the most powerful protective power, and to increase success and prosperity. His amulets are both highly revered for their sacred Power of Protection and Prosperity, but also as a connection and Buddhanissati reminder of the Great Guru master, to beseech his blessings through the amulet. One of the most highly sought after Pra Niyom Category Amulets, which is seen to grace the pages of any and every important amulet encyclopedia, and the highly prized and jealously guarded talisman of the high end collector and devotee.


A very rare exhibit of the Pra Kru Wat Suwan amulet find blessing ceremony, an ancient burial place amulet, classed as an official model of the pantheon of amulets attributed to the great Luang Por Niam of Wat Noi. This exhibit is the Pra Pim Nakprok Klong Takian Nuea Chin Takua Sanim Daeng, A very valuable addition for collectors of the Pra Kru Wat Suwan Hiding Place Find amulet, and Luang Por Niam. The amulets were blessed at Wat Suwan along with the series he made at Wat Noi (which are in truth, one and the same and of equal value, and only differ academically, but otherwise, are equal to each other).

 

Luang Por Niam was the number one Kroo Ba Ajarn and Ordaining Officer of the great Master Monk Luang Por Parn of Wat Bang Nom Kho, who was witnessed to have died in complete happiness and relaxation, in meditative bliss, as an attained ascended Master. For this reason, Luang Por Noi has many faithfull devotees around the world, who worship him and his teachings, and revere his attainments, and wish to wear one of his blessed amulet.

Luang Phor Niam

Luang Por Parn is worshiped as one of the Top 10 Greatest Guru Monks of present-day in Thailand & many worshippers all around the world. He was the closest disciple of Luang Por Niam

KATA PRA NAKPROK

Kata Pra Nakprok, and the chanting it to Pra Nakprok amulets and Buddha statues, is the Thai Buddhist Method for Praying to the Pra Nakprok Naga Canopy Buddha. Pray to on Saturdays or for those Born on Saturday.This Bpaang is of the Buddha sitting in Samamadhi (concentrative meditation), on top of a Naga, the Naga’s head is raised over Buddha’s to form a canopy. It is known as “Bpaang Nakprok”

The Buddha remained in blissful rapture under the Acabhalanikaroda for seven days, whereupon he moved to the Mucalinda tree to the Southeast side of the Bodhi tree. A terrible rainstorm began, pouring down on the forest for a whole seven days without stopping. Payanaga Mucalinda, who was King of the Nagas, came up from the naga Realm in the underworld and coiled himself underneath the Buddha, making a cushion seven stories high, to keep him dry.

He rose up and leaned his head over the Lord opening his neck canopy to shade the Buddha from the rain, as well as keeping watch to protect him from all sorts of parasitic, poisonous and preying animals and creatures. As the rains ceased to fall, the Naga King uncoiled and changed into a Human form and raised his hands in reverence to Buddha.

In this moment, the Buddha uttered the following Kata (words);
Sukhoewiwego Dtudtassa Sudtadhammassa Bpassadtoe Abhayaabpach-chang Sukhang Loke Bpaanapuudtesuu Sanyamosukhaa Wiraakadtaa Loke Gaamaanang Smadtiggamo Asmimaanassa Winayo Edtang We Bparamang Sukhang.

 

“Tranquility is the pleasure of he who has listened to and understood the Dharma intently, who sees conditioned things for what they really are, and does not seek to harm others. Of he who has abolished his passions and cravings, lust and desires, he who has stepped beyond all craving for sensual pleasures and endured in his efforts to do away with self conceited attitudes, has the greatest pleasure”.
The statue of Buddha sitting on seven coils of the Naga King snake was created to remember this occasion of the Naga paying reverence to Lord Buddha, and the representation of him sitting on top of the coils as if seated upon a royal throne is used for two reasons; 1. Aesthetics, 2. Brahmin influence.

 

A more authentic and historical version of this Buddha image is sometimes seen in the form of the Nagas coils wrapped around and covering the Buddha’s body with four or five coils around him. The only part of the body visible being Lord Buddha’s shoulders, neck and head, which is also semi enclosed by the head and canopy of the Naga leaning over him.

Luang por Niam, was responsible for blessing the many amulets found in the Kru Wat Suwan in Ang Tong, and added his own amulets from Wat Noi,, which are despite being the same amulets, received a second blessing (making their slightly cheaper price hard to understand). The two different releases are easily and visibly different, due to the surface effects from being hidden within a Kru Chamber.. This exhibit of the Pra Sangkajjai is evidently a direct release from Wat Noi, due to the slightly greenish-black tone, with white Kraap mildew, whereas the exhibit which he buried at Wat Suwan.

The Pra Gru Wat Suwan Series

The Pra Kru Wat Suwan Pantheon of amulets were discovered, around the Year 2500 Buddhist Era, and were found at Wat Suwan, located in the Province of Ang Tong, above Ayuttaya, and adjacent to Lopburi and Singhburi Provinces in North Central Thailand. The amulets were then also reblessed in celebration of the find, and the great Luang Por Niam of Wat Noi in Supannburi was invited to preside over, and empower the amulets during the 2506 Kru Discovery amulet find Celebration Ceremony.

 

The natural appearance of an authentic Pra Kru Wat Suwan leaden amulets, is that they have a fine layer of Kraap Kru arising on portios ofthe surface, showing red rust from oxidisation. It is also important to note that the Pra Kru Wat Suwan amulets did not have their edges filed off into perfect frames, and have rough unfiled edges because of this factor. This is one of the first things to look for when collecting authentic Pra Kru Wat Suwan artifacts.

According to historical records, the great master Monk of Wat Noi in Supannburi, Luang Por Niam, was invited to assist in the making, casting, and empowerment of the additional amulets which were being made. This makes the Pra Kru Wat Suwan enter into the Pantheon of aficionados of this Monk and his Amulets, and their popularity has become ever more legendary, to the point where the Pra Kru Wat Suwan is now a piece of National Historical Heritage.

 

The age of the ancient burial find models ranges up to 700 years to 1000 years old, and the edition added by Luang Por Noi is dated around the Mid-Ratanakkosin Era, making them past the Multi-Centenarian level (more than a few Centuries Old).

Many different Pim (models) of amulets were found in lesser and greater numbers, all differing slightly, due to the ancient casting methods used during olden days, making it impossible to make thousands of identical amulets as seen in the modern era, with modern block press engineering technology. The amulets were cast from ancient mercurial leaden sacred alloy, & also were found in reddish baked Eearthen sacred clay. The amulets exist in many forms;

Such as the Pra Upakut, Pra Sangkajjai, Pra Rod Lampun, Pra Ruang Rang Pern, Pra Lila Laweng, Pra Lila Kampaeng Gaew walking Buddha votive tablets, Pra Pratummaas, Pra Supann Hlang Pra,Pra Mahesworn Nuea Chin Ngern silver leaden amulets, Pra Pong Supan Benjapakee amulets, identical to those found at the Kru Wat Pra Sri Mahatat find, Pra Lor Pim Pra Pratan Buddha Immages (in small and large sizes), and Pra Paruhnang Loi Ongk Buddha statuette amulets, Pra Pim Mokkhala Saribut (Maugdalyayana and Saributra) Buddha amulet, the Pra Tham Suea Ruesi Amulet in both Pim Hnaa Gae and Pim Hnaa Ruesi, Pra Kum Nakorn Khosa, Pra Pim Wat Rachadesa, Pra Put Pim Siarn Hlaem pointed head Buddha votive tablet in leaden alloy, The Pra Kong Lampun Benjapakee amulet, all versions of the Khun Phaen Ban Krang earthen amulets in all models, such as the Pim Khaen Orn, Pim Bai Mayom, Pim Pra Pratan, Pim Lueay, Pim Song Pon Yai, Pim Plai Dtat Diaw, Pim Plai Koo, Khun Phaen Pim Pha Seek, and so on.

 

 

This amulet is highly recommended for those born on Saturdays, as their auspicious ‘Birthday Buddha’ to increase Good Karma (Serm Duang). The front face of the amulet features the Buddha sat in Meditation on a coiled 7 headed Naga Throne, depicting the moment a Naga rose over the buddha to make a canopy for him to shelter from the rain.

 

The rear face of the amulet has the typical Yant Dtp found on Ayutthaya Kru find era Klong Takian odel type amuets.

 

Extra Goodie for enjoyment! – Amulet school. Maybe you may find an amulet you own in this video!


Luang Phu Mun Puritatto

Rian Lai Ganok Sacred Guru Monk Coin with ‘Ganok’ flamed embellishments around the edges, and the Image of Luang Phu Mun Puritadto, of Wat Pha Sutawas emblazoned. This is a limited series Gammagarn version, with series code stamp, which is seen on the Sangkati sash of the Guru Monk, bearing the Code Met Nga Sesame seed shaped stamp, with a Khom Sanskrit Letter embossed.

Luang Phu Mun Thai amulet

The amulet has the images of an almsbowl, a kettle and a Glod Umbrella, the basic traveling necessities of the Thai Tudong Forest Tradition Lineage of LP Mun. The amulet was released in 2520 BE, and is first edition, after Luang Por Kinaree released his own first edition coin with his own image in the year 2519 BE. This series of amulets were fashioned in the same shape, but with the image of Luang Phu Mun Puritatto, blessed by Lineage Master, and Abbot of Wat Gantasilawas, Luang Por Kinaree Jantiyo, in Grand Buddha Abhisekha ceremony. The ceremony was held directly at Wat Gandtasilawas in Nakorn Phanom, with a host of other great Tudong Masters of the Luang Phu Mun Thai Forest Tradition.

The amulet has the Kata ‘namo Wmudtaanang Namo Wimudtiyaa’ on the rear face below the almsbowl, the Kata of LP Mun, representing the heart of the Tudong Kammathana Practice. The amulet is forged from Nuea Tong Daeng Sacred Copper Brazen Alloy, and was blessed on the 13th April 2520 BE after Traimas three month nightly empowerments at the temple beforehand. The amulet has the words ‘Puritadto’ on the front of the base of the amulet, with Luang Phu Mun seated in meditation above.


The amulets were released in the year 2513-2514 BE in a very special Buddha Abhiseka, at the temple of Wat Gantasilaram, with a large number of some of the greatest Guru Masters of the time present to empower, from the lineage of Luang Phu Mun

Ajarn Mun Bhuridatta Thera (Thai: มั่น ภูริทตฺโต, rtgs: Ajarn Mun Phurithatto; Lao: ຫຼວງປູ່ມັ່ນ ພູຣິທັຕໂຕ), 1870–1949, was a Thai bhikkhu of Lao descent who is credited, along with his mentor, Ajarn Sao Kantasīlo, with establishing the Thai Forest Tradition or “Kammaṭṭhāna tradition” that subsequently spread throughout Thailand and to several countries abroad. Ajarn Mun was born in Baan Kham Bong, a farming village in Ubon Ratchathani Province, Isan.
Ordained as a monk in 1893, he spent the remainder of his life wandering through Thailand, Burma, and Laos, dwelling for the most part in the forest, engaged in the practice of meditation. He attracted an enormous following of students and, together with his teacher, Sao Kantasīlo (1861–1941), established the Thai Forest Tradition (the kammaṭṭhāna tradition) that subsequently spread throughout Thailand and to several countries abroad. He died at Wat Suddhavasa, Sakon Nakhon Province.

Ajarn Mun was born in Baan Kham Bong, a farming village in Ubon Ratchathani Province, Isan. Ordained as a monk in 1893, he spent the remainder of his life wandering through Thailand, Burma, and Laos, dwelling for the most part in the forest, engaged in the practice of meditation. He attracted an enormous following of students and, together with his teacher, Sao Kantasīlo (1861–1941), established the Thai Forest Tradition (the Kammaṭhāna tradition) that subsequently spread throughout Thailand and to several countries abroad. He died at Wat Pha Sutawas, Sakon Nakhon Province. (Wikipedia)

We would like to share a passage written by Luang Por Thanissaro Bhikkhu (Ajarn Geoffrey de-Graaf), who wrote a most explanatory essay of the role of the Great Ajarn Mun in the revival of the true Buddhist Practice and the Rise of the Thai Tudong Kammathana Forest tradition;

Throughout its history, Buddhism has worked as a civilizing force. Its teachings on karma, for instance — the principle that all intentional actions have consequences — have taught morality and compassion to many societies. But on a deeper level, Buddhism has always straddled the line between civilization and wilderness. The Buddha himself gained Awakening in a forest, gave his first sermon in a forest, and passed away in a forest.

The qualities of mind he needed in order to survive physically and mentally as he went, unarmed, into the wilds, were key to his discovery of the Dhamma. They included resilience, resolve, and alertness; self-honesty and circumspection; steadfastness in the face of loneliness; courage and ingenuity in the face of external dangers; compassion and respect for the other inhabitants of the forest.

These qualities formed the “home culture” of the Dhamma.
Periodically, as Buddhism spread and adapted to different societies, some practitioners felt that the original message of the Dhamma had become diluted. So they returned to the wilderness in order to revive its home culture. Many wilderness traditions are still alive today, especially in the Theravada countries of Sri Lanka and Southeast Asia. There, mendicant ascetic monks continue to wander through the remaining rainforests, in search of Awakening in the same environment where the Buddha found Awakening himself.

Among these wilderness traditions, the one that has attracted the largest number of Western students, and is beginning to take root in the West, is the Kammatthana (Meditation) Forest tradition of Thailand.

The Kammatthana tradition was founded by Ajarn Mun Bhuridatto in the early decades of this century. Ajarn Mun’s mode of practice was solitary and strict. He followed the Vinaya (monastic discipline) faithfully, and also observed many of what are known as the thirteen classic dhutanga (ascetic) practices, such as living off almsfood, wearing robes made of cast-off rags, dwelling in the forest, eating only one meal a day.

Searching out secluded places in the wilds of Thailand and Laos, he avoided the responsibilities of settled monastic life and spent long hours of the day and night in meditation. In spite of his reclusive nature, he attracted a large following of students willing to put up with the hardships of forest life in order to study with him.
He also had his detractors, who accused him of not following traditional Thai Buddhist customs. He usually responded by saying that he wasn’t interested in bending to the customs of any particular society — as they were, by definition, the customs of people with greed, anger, and delusion in their minds. He was more interested in finding and following the Dhamma’s home culture, or what he called the customs of the noble ones: the practices that had enabled the Buddha and his disciples to achieve Awakening in the first place.

This phrase — the customs of the noble ones — comes from an incident in the Buddha’s life: not long after his Awakening, he returned to his home town in order to teach the Dhamma to the family he had left six years earlier. After spending the night in a forest, he went for alms in town at daybreak. His father the king learned of this and immediately went to upbraid him. “This is shameful,” the king said. “No one in the lineage of our family has ever gone begging. It’s against our family customs.”
“Your majesty,” the Buddha replied, “I now belong, not to the lineage of my family, but to the lineage of the noble ones. Theirs are the customs I follow.” Ajarn Mun devoted many years of his life to tracking those customs down. Born in 1870, the son of rice farmers in the northeastern province of Ubon, he was ordained as a monk in the provincial capital in 1892. At the time of his ordination, there were two broad types of Buddhism available in Thailand; Maha Nikkaya and the Dhammayut Movements.

The first can be called Customary Buddhism — the mores and rites handed down over the centuries from teacher to teacher with little, if any, reference to the Pali canon. For the most part, these customs taught monks to live a sedentary life in the village monastery, serving the local villagers as doctors or fortune tellers. Monastic discipline tended to be loose. Occasionally, monks would go on a pilgrimage they called “dhutanga” which bore little resemblance to the classic dhutanga practices. Instead, it was more an undisciplined escape valve for the pressures of sedentary life. Moreover, monks and lay people practiced forms of meditation that deviated from the path of tranquillity and insight outlined in the Pali canon. Their practices, called vichaa aakhom, or incantation knowledge, involved initiations and invocations used for shamanistic purposes, such as protective charms and magical powers. They rarely mentioned nirvana except as an entity to be invoked for shamanic rites. The second type of Buddhism available at the time, was Reform Buddhism, based on the Pali canon and begun in the 1820’s by Prince Mongkut, who later became King Rama IV (and still later was portrayed in the musical The King and I).

Prince Mongkut was ordained as a monk for twenty-seven years before ascending the throne. After studying the canon during his early years as a monk, he grew discouraged by the level of practice he saw around him in Thai monasteries. So he reordained among the Mons — an ethnic group that straddled the Thai-Burmese border and occupied a few villages across the river from Bangkok — and studied Vinaya and the classic dhutanga practices under the guidance of a Mon teacher. Later, his brother, King Rama III, complained that it was disgraceful for member of the royal family to join an ethnic minority, and so built a monastery for the Prince-Monk on the Bangkok side of the river. There, Mongkut attracted a small but strong following of like-minded monks and lay supporters, and in this way the Dhammayut (lit., In Accordance with the Dhamma) movement was born.

In its early years, the Dhammayut movement was an informal grouping devoted to Pali studies, focusing on Vinaya, the classic dhutanga practices, a rationalist interpretation of the Dhamma, and the revival of meditation techniques taught in the Pali canon, such as recollection of the Buddha and mindfulness of the body. None of the movement’s members, however, could prove that the teachings of the Pali canon actually led to enlightenment. Mongkut himself was convinced that the path to nirvana was no longer open, but he felt that a great deal of merit could be made by reviving at least the outward forms of the earliest Buddhist traditions. Formally taking a bodhisattva vow, he dedicated the merit of his efforts to future Buddhahood. Many of his students also took vows, hoping to become disciples of that future Buddha.

Upon disrobing and ascending the throne after his brother’s death in 1851, Rama IV was in a position to impose his reforms on the rest of the Thai Sangha, but chose not to. Instead, he quietly sponsored the building of new Dhammayut centers in the capital and the provinces, which was how — by the time of Ajarn Mun — there came to be a handful of Dhammayut monasteries in Ubon.
Ajarn Mun felt that Customary Buddhism had little to offer and so he joined the Dhammayut order, taking a student of Prince Mongkut as his preceptor. Unlike many who joined the order at the time, he wasn’t interested in the social advancement that would come with academic study and ecclesiastical appointments. Instead, his life on the farm had impressed on him the sufferings inherent in the cycle of life and death, and his single aim was to find a way out of the cycle. As a result, he soon left the scholarly environment of his preceptor’s temple and went to live with a teacher named Ajarn Sao Kantasilo (1861-1941) in a small meditation monastery on the outskirts of town.

Ajarn Sao was unusual in the Dhammayut order in that he had no scholarly interests but was devoted to the practice of meditation. He trained Ajarn Mun in strict discipline and canonical meditation practices, set in the context of the dangers and solitude of the wilderness. He could not guarantee that this practice would lead to the noble attainments, but he believed that it headed in the right direction.
After wandering for several years with Ajarn Sao, Ajarn Mun set off on his own in search of a teacher who could show him for sure the way to the noble attainments. His search took nearly two decades and involved countless hardships as he trekked through the jungles of Laos, central Thailand, and Burma, but he never found the teach
er he sought.

Gradually he realized that he would have to follow the Buddha’s example and take the wilderness itself as his teacher, not simply to conform to the ways of nature — for nature is samsara itself — but to break through to truths transcending them entirely. If he wanted to find the way beyond aging, illness, and death, he would have to learn the lessons of an environment where aging, illness, and death are thrown into sharp relief. At the same time, his encounters with other monks in the forest convinced him that learning the lessons of the wilderness involved more than just mastering the skills of physical survival.

 

He would also have to develop the acuity not to be misled by dead-end sidetracks in his meditation. So, with a strong sense of the immensity of his task, he returned to a mountainous region in central Thailand and settled alone in a cave.
In the long course of his wilderness training, Ajarn Mun learned that — contrary to Reform and Customary beliefs — the path to nirvana was not closed. The true Dhamma was to be found not in old customs or texts but in the well-trained heart and mind. The texts were pointers for training, nothing more or less. The rules of the Vinaya, instead of simply being external customs, played an important role in physical and mental survival. As for the Dhamma texts, practice was not just a matter of confirming what they said. Reading and thinking about the texts could not give an adequate understanding of what they meant — and did not count as showing them true respect. True respect for the texts meant taking them as a challenge: putting their teachings seriously to the test to see if, in fact, they are true. In the course of testing the teachings, the mind would come to many unexpected realizations that were not contained in the texts. These in turn had to be put to the test as well, so that one learned gradually by trial and error to the point of an actual noble attainment. Only then, Ajarn Mun would say, did one understand the Dhamma.

 

This attitude toward the Dhamma parallels what ancient cultures called “warrior knowledge” — the knowledge that comes from developing skills in difficult situations — as opposed to the “scribe knowledge” that people sitting in relative security and ease can write down in words. Of course, warriors need to use words in their training, but they view a text as authoritative only if its teachings are borne out in practice. The Canon itself encourages this attitude when it quotes the Buddha as teaching his aunt, “As for the teachings of which you may know, ‘These teachings lead to dispassion, not to passion; to being unfettered, not to being fettered; to divesting, not to accumulating; to modesty, not to self-aggrandizement; to contentment, not to discontent; to seclusion, not to entanglement; to aroused persistence, not to laziness; to being unburdensome, not to being burdensome’: You may definitely hold, ‘This is the Dhamma, this is the Vinaya, this is the Teacher’s instruction.'”
Thus the ultimate authority in judging a teaching is not whether the teaching can be found in a text. It lies in each person’s relentless honesty in putting the Dhamma to the test and carefully monitoring the results.
When Ajarn Mun had reached the point where he could guarantee that the path to the noble attainments was still open, he returned to the northeast to inform Ajarn Sao and then to continue wandering.

 

Gradually he began to attract a grassroots following. People who met him were impressed by his demeanor and teachings, which were unlike those of any other monks they had known. They believed that he embodied the Dhamma and Vinaya in everything he did and said. As a teacher, he took a warrior’s approach to training his students. Instead of simply imparting verbal knowledge, he put them into situations where they would have to develop the qualities of mind and character needed in surviving the battle with their own defilements. Instead of teaching a single meditation technique, he taught them a full panoply of skills — as one student said, “Everything from washing spittoons on up” — and then sent them into the wilds.
It was after Ajarn Mun’s return to the northeast that a third type of Buddhism emanating from Bangkok — State Buddhism — began to impinge on his life. In an effort to present a united front in the face of imperialist threats from Britain and France, Rama V (1868-1910) wanted to move the country from a loose feudal system to a centralized nation-state. As part of his program, he and his brothers — one of whom was ordained as a monk — enacted religious reforms to prevent the encroachment of Christian missionaries. Having received their education from British tutors, they created a new monastic curriculum that subjected the Dhamma and Vinaya to Victorian notions of reason and utility.

 

Their new version of the Vinaya, for instance, was a compromise between Customary and Reform Buddhism designed to counter Christian attacks that monks were unreliable and lazy. Monks were instructed to give up their wanderings, settle in established monasteries, and accept the new state curriculum. Because the Dhammayut monks were the best educated in Thailand at the time — and had the closest connections to the royal family — they were enlisted to do advance work for the government in outlying regions.
In 1928, a Dhammayut authority unsympathetic to meditation and forest wanderers took charge of religious affairs in the northeast. Trying to domesticate Ajarn Mun’s following, he ordered them to establish monasteries and help propagate the government’s program. Ajarn Mun and a handful of his students left for the north, where they were still free to roam. In the early 1930’s, Ajarn Mun was appointed the abbot of an important monastery in the city of Chieng Mai, but fled the place before dawn of the following day.

He returned to settle in the northeast only in the very last years of his life, after the local ecclesiastical authorities had grown more favorably disposed to his way of practice. He maintained many of his dhutanga practices up to his death in 1949.
It wasn’t until the 1950’s that the movement he founded gained acceptance in Bangkok, and only in the 1970’s did it come into prominence on a nationwide level. This coincided with a widespread loss of confidence in state monks, many of whom were little more than bureaucrats in robes. As a result, Kammatthana monks came to represent, in the eyes of many monastics and lay people, a solid and reliable expression of the Dhamma in a world of fast and furious modernization.
Buddhist history has shown that wilderness traditions go through a very quick life cycle.

 

As one loses its momentum, another often grows up in its place. But with the wholesale destruction of Thailand’s forests in the last few decades, the Kammatthana tradition may be the last great forest tradition that Thailand will produce. Fortunately, we in the West have learned of it in time to gather lessons that will be help in cultivating the customs of the noble ones on Western soil and establishing authentic wilderness traditions of our own.
Perhaps the most important of those lessons concerns the role that the wilderness plays in testing and correcting trends that develop among Buddhists in cities and towns. The story of the Kammatthana tradition gives lie to the facile notion that Buddhism has survived simply by adapting to its host culture. The survival of Buddhism and the survival of the Dhamma are two different things. People like Ajarn Mun — willing to make whatever sacrifices are needed to discover and practice the Dhamma on its own terms — are the ones who have kept the Dhamma alive.

Of course, people have always been free to engage in Buddhist traditions in whatever way they like, but those who have benefited most from that engagement are those who, instead of reshaping Buddhism to fit their preferences, reshape themselves to fit in with the customs and traditions of the noble ones. To find these customs isn’t easy, given the bewildering variety of traditions that Buddhists have spawned over the centuries. To test them, each individual is thrown back on his or her own powers of relentless honesty, integrity, and discernment.

There are no easy guarantees. And perhaps this fact in itself is a measure of the Dhamma’s true worth. Only people of real integrity can truly comprehend it. As Ajarn Lee, one of Ajarn Mun’s students, once said, “If a person isn’t true to the Buddha’s teachings, the Buddha’s teachings won’t be true to that person — and that person won’t be able to know what the Buddha’s true teachings are”.

Source; The Customs of the Noble Ones”, by Thanissaro Bhikkhu. Access to Insight (Legacy Edition), 7 June 2010, http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/authors/thaniss… ©1999 Thanissaro Bhikkhu


Pra Putta Mongkol Maha Lap Amulets Mae

The Pra Somdej Mongkol Maha Lap amulet series of 2499 BE, was released at Wat Sarnath, in Rayong, to fund the creation and installment of the Pra Putto Pas Chinarat Jom Muni Buddha statue, which was made at Wat Sapmant Wongs, in Bangkok, and donated to be installed at Wat Sarnath, as the Pra Pratan main Central Buddha image within the Uposatha shrine room.

Below; a rare version of Pra Somdej Nakprok Mongkol Maha Lap Nuea Pong Maha Solos Daeng 2499 BE Mae Chee Bun Ruean Wat Awut
in Nuea Daeng

Somdej Mongkol Maha Lap Pim Prok Po Mae Chee Bun Ruean

Somdej Mongkol Maha Lap Pim Prok Po Mae Chee Bun Ruean Wat Awut.

The amulets were made in various powders, white nuea solos, brown nuea wan, and red nuea wan sabu luead, as well as nuea bailan and other admixtures. Some received the inscription of the Yant Putto, or the Yant Dto Rasamee, of Mae Chee Bun Ruean, and others were left with ‘Hlang Riab’ ‘smooth faced’ rear sides. All versions contain the famous pong Maha Solos Maha Lap (Pong Guubose), which is legendary for its powers

This amulet comes with the existing Stainless Steel Casing – The alternative of Free Waterproof Casing is also an Optional Offer with this Amulet, if you wish to encase with Waterproof Casing at no extra cost. Free Registered Airmail Shipping Worldwide is offered included with this amulet, as is the case with all amulets in Ancient Amulet Store.


There was never a ceremony to invite the Devas so majestic as the ceremony performed by Mae Chee Bun Ruean, which included not only the ubiquitous incenses, puffed rice, flower garlands in 7 different colors, but also a total of 375 Kinds of Food Offerings! The Benja and 9 Saewadta Chadtras offered, 5 sork high (‘sork’being a Thai form of measurement, meaning ‘5 elbows’, slightly over 2 Feet per ‘sork’). Five Golden and Silver Bai Sri were place in offering, also 5 sork high in stature.

The chanting ceremonyn to bless the holy water with the assistance of the attendiing Devas, was then mixed with the sacred powders used for the muan sarn clays of the amulets. Many great and psychically attained monks were invited to empower and bless the sacred ingredients for the amulets, and the amulets themself after their pressing;

1. Pra Prohm Muni (LP Phin Suwajo), of Wat Bovornives Vora Viharn, 2. Pra Worawaet Kunajarn (LP MIan Bpappasaro), of Wat Pra Chetupon Wimon Manghalaram, 3. Pra Maha Racha Manghalajarn, 4. Pra Kroo Winaiton (LP Fueang Yana Bpaheebpo), 5. Pra Sa-Ard Apiwattano, of Wat Sampant Wongs, 6. Pra Kroo Nor, of Wat Klang Ta Ruea, in Ayuttaya, 7. Pra Ajarn Bung, of Wat Mai Nong Sen, and 8. Pra Luang Por Chorp Sammajaree, of Wat Awut Wigasitaram in Thonburi, as well as the prior and later blessings and empowerments made by Mae Chee Bun Ruean Herself.
In Addition, during the Deva Abhiseka, the Ruesi Yogi Ajarn Rerb (Ajarn Chern Jantr Paetch), who was a very powerful and famous Ruesi of the Era, assisted in empowering the amulets.

Then a second empowerment session was performed, with the amulets pressed and placed covered with 7 layers of 7 green and 7 white cloths covering them, placed upon an altar in the center of the shrine room.

Many people in the amulet world have been interested in knowing what was used in the making of the sacred powder admixtures, and so we find it impportant to document and list them in this article, for posterity and study;
1. Sacred Powders from a Host of Great Masters of that Era and Previous Eras, through the lineage of each Master who donated and empowered the powders.

2. Powders from Wat Chetupon, Wat Sri Totsataep, Wat Sampant Wongs(Wat Sampantawongs).

3. Broken powdered pieces of ancient sacred amulets.

4. Powdered up herbal ingredients with magical properties, ground up to make a brownish herbal powder.

5. Earths from 7 Prosperous Ports, and the banks of 7 Sacred Lakes. 6. Powders made from taking ancient Kampir Grimoires of Sorcery (Sacred in themself), of both the Bailan Beige Parchmnent variety, and the Samut Khoi black Parchment variety of Grimoire, and burn them and grind into powders, with 5 repetitions of admixture, adding powders from previous editions of amulets.

6. Earths from sacred Pilgrimage Places of the Life of the Buddha in India, brought back to be used for the admixture, to bring Sacred Buddhakhun Power to the amulets, with earths from the important places of the Buddha’s Life, such as the Buddha’s birth, earths from around the Bodhi Tree where the Buddha’s Enlightenment occurred, the place where he gave his first sermon in Varanasi (the Dhamma Chakra), and earths from the place of the Buddha’s Passing into Nibbana.

7. Earths from important places where the Buddha performed great Sermon, or Important Events in his Life occurred, and which are to this day, all sacred places and shrines to the Buddha.

8. Pong Poon Khaw Hin Rachaburi powders.

9. Sacred Talcs invoked with Negative Space inscribed Yantra Spells.

10. Nam Oy Sugarcane Juice.

The amulets are made from a Muan Sarn Sacred Powders composed of a large variety of sacred clay earths, herbal pollens and powders, and Puttakun powder. Herbs and Sacred ingredients with all sorts of different blessings and powers were added to give a complete range of blessings.

All these Muan Sarn ingredients were ground into fine powders, and separated into different admixtures, and mixed with holy water from the first Buddha Abhiseka and Deva Abhiseka Blessing Ceremony. The amulets were pressed as the Pra Somdej Pra Putta Mongkol Maha Lap (Buddha Manghala), Pra Nakprok, Pra Putto, and other forms such as various kinds of Pra Somdej, Nang Kwak, and other amulets.

Above and beyond this, the amulet is a Sacred Artifact of Buddhanussati, an authentic Sacred Buddha Image Votive Tablet, blessed and made in 2499 by Kun Mae Chee Bun Ruean, in two ceremonies held at Wat Sampantwongs and Wat Sarnath, both Mae Chee Bun Ruean Lineage Temples.

The amulets were handed out to devotees during a later ceremony who came to donate and support the installation of the Putta Sima temple boundary of Wat Sarnath, and many of the amulets were of course held for burial within shrine rooms and Chedi Stupas of choice, for later distribution, or accidental rediscovery long into the future.

This is a common practice with amulets, where they are placed in a hiding place chamber (Kru), or buried under the ground or under the floor of sacred places, as a way of preserving the fact that there was once a Buddha who walked upon this earth. Hiding Place amulets are also stored in Kru Chambers as a repository to use for fundraising by removing a number and distributing them to devotees who donate to the temple (Note; The placement and removal of amulets from Kru for providing a method of creating fundraisers only became a practice during the last century, after Buddhist amulets became a source of fundraising).

According to the written documentation of Luang Phu Tet Nitesago, the Pong Solos powders made by Mae Chee Bun Ruean to make the amulets, were made using the Wicha Prohmasat (Brahma Sastra), which invokes High Brahmas and Ariya Sangha (Enlughtened Beings), of the Sutawas celestial level, to empower the powders. They were made to distribute to devotees, and fund the installation of the Pra Putto Chinarach Jom Muni Buddha statue of Wat Sarnath.

The amulets have become very famed for their miraculous powers, due to many stories of miraculous events connected with devotees and the amulets. Mae Chee Bun Ruean invoked the spiritual Connections of the angelic beings of the Buddhist, Christian and Islamic Faiths to imbue their blessings, to protect people of all religions, who keep the precepts of goodness and abstention from evil acts. The real name of the powders is ‘Pong Maha Prohm Ariya Bodhisattva Phuu Bpen Jao’ (Powders of the Enlightened Brahmas who are Lords of their Existence’).

This was because of Ajarn Seng, who taught and revealed that all three religions, speak of the same one Super-consciousness or ‘God’ (Buddha-hood for Buddhists), but which different cultures over time split and adapted into their own social structures, and changed them according to their needs, but that all three are derived from the same fact that enlightened beings gave teachings to unenlightened humans, and were worshiped for it as messiahs, prophets, or gods, and became founders of these religions.

The great Luang Por Lee is said to have found the 2499 BE Somdej Mongkol Maha Lap so powerful that he basked for some of the broken ones to be given to him to mix into the sacred clay of his famous sacred Pra Bai Po Jak amulets of the 2500 BE 25 Centuries of Buddhism Mega Nationwide Amulet Ceremony.

Pra Bai Po Jakr LP Lee Wat Asokaram

Pra Bai Po Jakr LP Lee Wat Asokaram

According to the Pra Tamma Khant, all Somdej amulets must be made in numbers of 84,000, but it is rumored that the Pra Putta Mongkol maha lap amulets were made in much less numbers, which is an unconfirmed rumor, and would be dubious considering Mae Chee Bun Ruean’s tendency to be a stickler for proper ritual and adhere to the dtamrta of the Wicha.

The Pra Putta Mongkol Maha Lap amulet is often used as a substitute for the Pra Pong Solos of Luang Phu Tim (much more difficult to find and much more expensive). Luang Phu Tim himself was also invited to perform Nang Prok meditative empowerment on thje amulets, as he was 70 years old. Considered one of the best amulets of the 2500 BE Era of Thai Buddhist Amulets.

Pra Somdej Putta Mongkol Maha Lap various sizes in white Pong Solos Powders.

Pra Somdej Putta Mongkol Maha Lap various sizes in white Pong Solos Powders.

Anothjer version of the Pra Somdej Putta Mongkol Maha Lap Nuea Solos

Another version of the Pra Somdej Putta Mongkol Maha Lap Nuea Solos


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One of the rarest and most highly revered and sought after Palad Khik of all Time, the Palad Khik Gae Nuea Mai Paya Ngiw Dam Dong Jarn Mer, of Luang Por Fak, of Wat Nikom Prachasan. Hand carved from sacred Deva inhabited black Ngiw treewood. The Palad Khik of Luang Por Fak is considered amongst the top five Palad Khik of all time, and carries Supreme Eminence in the Thai Collector Scene of the Krueang Rang Category, and for all Devotees of Palad Khik amulets.

Palad Khik Mai Ngiw Dam Dong LP Fak with Hand Spell Inscriptions

Palad Khik Mai Ngiw Dam Dong LP Fak with Hand Spell Inscriptions

Little is known of his Biography or Life before ordination, but it is known that he was the apprentice in Wicha to the great Luang Por Soke (also top 5 Palad Khik Master), and was the4 Kroo Ba Ajarn who taught the Wicha Palad Khik to the Great Luang Por Yid, of Wat Nong Jork. This Palad Khik from Luang Por Fak is in Pristine condition and exquisitely carved in the classic uniquitious curved shape which has come to be a trademark with the Palad Khik of Luang Por Fak.

A hole is drilled through the base of the Palad Khick for threading a cord through and attaching to a waistcord belt, or can alternatively be encased in waterproof casing with pendant hoop for wearing on a neckchain or belt as preferred.

Hole drilled in base of Palad Khik Mai Ngiw Dam Dong LP Fak

Hole drilled in base of Palad Khik Mai Ngiw Dam Dong LP Fak, for threading a cord for attachment to a belt or neckchain  – Hand spell inscriptions can be seen on the surface of the sacred black Paya Ngiw Dam Dong Treewood.

The back of the Palad Khik has three holes where special Muan Sarn is inserted. The body of the the Palad Khik is formed in the clasic curved shape which has become known to be ubiquitous with the Palad Khik of this Master. This exhibit is extremely rare for the hand inscription of the Yant Dan Dta (Yant Dto) on the head of the Palad Khik, which is said to be found on only very rarely.

The Palad Khik of Luang Por Fak are highly renowned for Kong Grapan Chadtri (Invincibility), Klaew Klaad (Evasion of Deadly Accidents), Metta Maha Niyom n(Mercy Charm), Kaa Khaay (Selling Power), and Lai Phuudt Phii Pisaj (Chase Demons and Ghosts Away).

3 Muan Sarn Inserts in the Palad Khik Mai Ngiw Dam Dong LP Fak

3 Muan Sarn Inserts in the Palad Khik Mai Ngiw Dam Dong LP Fak

The Palad Khik is empowered with the Kata; NA HI HA HU JA CHA DAN DTA
And the Kata Hua Jai Taw Waes Suwan “WAE SA PU SA”, and the Kata Hua Jai Ittijae for Metta Maha Sanaeh “I TA KA MA”, as well as the Kata Hua Jai Metta Karaniya Sutta “AE DTANG SA DTING”, topped off with the Hua Jai Maha Ud “UT TANG AD TO”.

 

11 Kinds of Blessings are included within the Magic of the Palad Khik’s Wicha; 1. Sleep peacefully, 2. Awaken with Happiness, 3. Protection against all Deadly Weaponry, 4. Immunity to Poisons, 5. Mercy Charm, 6. Good Business and Wealth Increase, 7. Convincing Speech, 8. Ward off Evil Spirits and Ghosts, 9. Improve Karma, 10. Protect Household and Property, 11. Increase Popularity & Chances of Promotion.

Palad Khik Mai Ngiw Dam Dong LP Fak

Palad Khik Mai Ngiw Dam Dong LP Fak

The Palad Khik is an Ancient Wicha, whose development can be traced right back to the Vedic Brahman Occult practices of Thousands of Years ago. Palad Khik amulets must be empowered by the repetition of incantations, which Thais call ‘Kata Bucha’, derived from the Devanagari ‘ghata poojah’. The incantations depend on the creator’s lineage in each school of traditional non-Buddhist animist magic.

Kata Bucha Palad Khik

Ganha Neha Na Ma Pa Ta

or

Ja Pa Ga Sa Na Mo Put Taa Ya Gan Ha Nae Ha Na Ma Pa Ta

or

Om Siwaling Sabbha Metta Sabbha Pokaa Sabbha Laapo Sabbha Tanaa, Sabbha Yasa, Sabbha Pranee Sabbha Mangalaani Bhavantume.

 

or

Om Laluay Mahaa Laluay Samsip Sorng Hee Hae Hom Lorm Dtorm Kuay Khor Hai Guu Ram Ruay Pro Hua Kuay An Nii Da Daa Di Dii Duu Dii Hee Maa Kuay Maa Burut Maa Dii Sadtrii Mii Maa Swaa Home

 

chant any one, or all of the Kata 3 times holding the Palad Khik before wearing


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Rian Glom Lek 2505 BE Por Tan Klai Wajasit (2)

Presenting a tiny but powerful and rare classic amulet from one of the Great Khao Or Masters of the 20th Century, Rian Glom Lek Hlang Chedi 2505 BE Nuea Tong Daeng Miniature Guru Monk Coin Por Tan Klai Wajasit

This Sacred amulet of the Great Khao Or Master of Nakorn Sri Tammarat, Master of Wat San Khan and Wat Pratat Noi, is a very rare amulet from Por Tan Klai’s 2505 BE Blessing Ceremony Edition, and is considered a ‘Jaek mae Krua’ type amulet (meaning ‘give to the kitchen maids and temple helpers’), which is suitable not only for men, but due to its miniature size, a perfect amulet for ladies or children to wear.

Rian Glom Lek 2505 BE Por Tan Klai Wajasit

Rian Glom Lek 2505 BE Por Tan Klai Wajasit Wat Suan Khan

The 2505 BE edition of amulets of Por Tan Klai, is a highly preferred edition, which saw his famous ‘Rian Glom’ round Monk coin amulet with Chakra released, The Rian Glom Lek Hlang Chedi, and the Roop Tai Por Tan Klai Guru Monk Blesséd Photographamulets such as look om chan hmak and ya sen tobacco balls, and sacred powder amulets of various models.


A very rare and highly prized amulet for the devotees of Por Tan Klai to associate with his image and pray to him with a blessed image of the Guru, and the Chedi Relic Stupa on rear face for Buddhanussati and Marananussati. A powerful and Sacred amulet which has passed through the hands of the Guru and been blessed by him.

Por Tan Klai was one of the Top Guru Master Monks of the Last Century, and is considered one of the Four Great Masters of the Previous Generation of Lineage Masters of the Khao Or Southern Sorcery Lineage.

Kata Bucha Por Tan Klai

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A Powerful Gurunussati Type Amulet, the Sacred Roop Tai Ad Grajok ‘mirror press’ version Olden Days Photograph of, the Great Guru Master Luang Por Opasi, Legendary Miracle Monk of of Asrom Bang Mot released in the year 2507 BE.

Roop Tai (Photos) were and still are one of the most direct ways in which a Devotee can connect with and revere to receive blessings from a chosen Guru master, and are a highly favored type of Sacred Amulet with Thai Buddhist People. Original Photos blessed by the olden days masters are of course also very rare and original. This photograph is double sided (Ad Grajok), and features the image of Luang Por Opasi standing on a pedestal with his hands raised in prayer, during the Ngan Piti Song Nam Luang Por Opasi bathing ceremony of 2507 BE at Asrom Bang Mot.

Roop Tai (Photos) were and still are one of the most direct ways in which a Devotee can connect with and revere to receive blessings from a chosen Guru master, and are a highly favored type of Sacred Amulet with Thai Buddhist People. Original Photos blessed by the olden days masters are of course also very rare and original.

Luang Por Opasi was born in 2441 BE, in Nakorn Sri Tammarat, but was taken and placed in charge of the Sangkaracha at the Royal Temple of Wat Bowornives in Bangkok, where he remained studying and was finally ordained as a full Bhikkhu, in 2461 BE at the age of 20, at Wat Bovornives.

He was ordained by the Sangkaracha Monk himself, as his Upachaya (Ordaining Officer). He studied Pali and Dhamma to reach the academic level of Prayoke 5, and then turned to study and practice Wicha Akom (Buddha Magic and Sorcery). He continued on there to attain his completion of Dhamma Studies and develop all facets of his practice, and finally, after 20 years serving at Wat Bowornives, he decided to begin Tudong Solitary Forest Wandering.

He spent the next 20 years wandering and learning Wicha with various Guru Masters throughout this time. One of the masters he spent the most time with to absorb the methods of empowerment and formulas, was Luang Por Gop, of Wat Khao Sariga in Nakorn Nayok. He spent a long time with this Master in order to develop the special abilities of Dtecho Kasin (Fire Kasina), and to stare at the flames and meditate to vanquish the restless mind, and to overcome material attachment.

Part of this practice, was to burn any possessions or material offerings given in the fire, and to watch them burn, until the Kilesa (selfish instinct and desires and attachments) cease to arise within the heart. After mastering his own heart, he returned to Wat Bowornives. But after some time, with his practice of burning all thing he was given, except the four requisites of food, medicine, clothing and lodging necessities, began to cause devotees to begin to travel from far and wide to pay reverence to Luang Por Opasi at Wat Bowornives, and this seemed unfitting to Luang Por Opasi, who did not wish to attract attention

Below; front cover of Amulets of LP Opasi Encyclopaedic Catalog

Amulets of LP Opasi Encyclopaedic Catalog

So he decided it was time to leave Wat Bowornives, and travel on Tudong to go stay at Bang Mot, but this was to no avail, because the devotees just followed after him to Bang Mot, and slowly but surely he was receiving many devotees again. The local folk of Bang Mot had also become very faifhtful devotees of Luang Por Opasi, and had built a small Samnak Songk (name of a Buddhist Forest Ashram before it becomes officially a registered temple) for Luang Por to reside in permanently.

From then on, Luang Por remained at Asrom Bang Mot, and developed it into a fully fledged temple, with his fold of devotees ranging from the poorest farmer, to the richest noble, all of whome came to give alms and watch those gifts which were not of the 4 requisites be burned in Luang Por Opasi’s fire. Everybody who came to have material possessions burned in the fire, would experience great wealthy fortunes thereafter, and the legend of Luang Por Opasi’s Powers began to circulate.

Luang Por Opasi was also very famous for his ability to appear in more than one place at the same time, and be seen by witnesses in both places. There is a Legend of a visit to India where Luang Por Opasi was supposed to appear, and he sent his two apprentice monks to travel ahead, saying he would appear there later.

In 2499 BE (1955), LP Opasi and two of his disciples where invited to a Buddhist gathering in India to be held from October 28. LP Opasi called to his two disciples to leave before him and that he would join them later. He also told them that he will not be on the spot before October 31 and to warn the organizers of his delay and the date of its arrival. October 31 many of his disciples went to the airport to wish LP Opasi a happy voyage, but it did not come, a few days later the death of LP Opasi was announced.

In fact, in the evening, LP Opasi warned his monks that he was going to remain in meditation several days and to not disturb him under any circumstance, then he went in his Kuti. He stayed there until a anxious monk decides to go and see whether LP Opasi were well or not, he enters the Kuti to find LP Opasi in a state having all the aspect of death.

During this time, in India, the two disciples of LP Opasi attended the Buddhist gathering in company of LP Opasi. Luang Por Opasi spoke with many other Buddhists dignitaries and gave even a state education in front of several hundreds of people, even photos of this occasion has being taken. LP Opasi said goodbye to its two disciples, and told them that he was going to return to Thailand only by separate means of transport.

Luang Por Opasi Mendicant Monk

When they arrived the disciples had a hard time believing the news of LP Opasis Passing Away, everyone believed that they had become insane when they said to have spent the last days in his company… Only the testimony of several other monks present and the photographs in India of LP Opasi proved the veracity of their incredible history.

 

Each year the coffin of LP Opasi is opened, his body has not decomposed and his finger nails and hair is cut. This is a common thing regarding monks that have become enlightened, The body will not decompose or if the body is burned the bones will turn to stone or diamond.

(extra info: The great master of Sak Yant Luang Por Phern (Wat Bang Pra) was a student of Luang Por Opasi)

Luang Por Opasi Kata for Chanting;

Ithisukhathoe Arahang Puttoe Namoe Puttaaya Bpatawee Kongkaa Phrapoom Taewaa Khamaamihang

Prakam 108 Met Nuea Mai Saksit Dtid Rian Kroo Ba Gaew 2520 BE – a Sacred wooden bead Blessėd Rosary with Guru Monk coin, from the great Lanna Monk, Kroo Ba Gaew Sutto, of Wat Doi Mokkhala, in Chiang Mai. Serm Duang (Good Karma) Maha Mongkol (Auspicious Blessings), Klaew Klaad (Evade Dangers), Maha Lap (Lucky Fortunes)

The rosary has a 2520 BE Rian Roop Muean Guru Monk Coin with the image of Kroo Ba Gaew gazing sideways on the front face, and a Sacred Nam Tao Yantra with Khom Agkhara on the rear face. A highly recommendable item for Buddhanussati and Gurunussati, Meditation, Prayer Counting, Protection and Mercy Charm. Wear as a necklace with amulet of the Guru. and use for counting your prayers and Kata Chants.

Luang Phu Kroo Ba Gaew was trained in his early ordination under the lineage of Luang Phu Mun Puritatto, and is one of the great Kroo Ba Ajarn of the Northern Lanna Region, who was a very close companion of the Great Luang Phu Hwaen Sujjino, of Wat Doi Mae Pang.

 

Luang Phu Kroo Ba Gaew has somewhat of a mysterious past, because his biography was never officially documented, and Kroo Ba Gaew himself was not prone to talk about himself very much. This of course common with High Arya Sangha who have practiced and attained inner peace, and is in itself a sign of great attainments. Sadly however, this results in little being known about his early life as a monk in the lineage of Luang Phu Mun, leaving us with only a partial knowledge of his Biography.

 

But the miracles of this Great Monk have been told and retold over many decades, and by word of mouth, Kroo Ba Gaew became a Great Kroo Ba Ajarn of the region, on the merits of Miracles made. It is said, that once during the time Kroo Ba Gaew was still living, a Naga Serpent came up from the underworld near the temple, and was run over by a truck as it slithered across the road, and was hurt. The Naga crawled up to the temple and called Luang Phu Kroo Ba Gaew to come out and heal him with holy water.

Another famous legend is the tale of the three Buddha images in the Mae Nam Ping river, which were embedded in the stream. Luang Phu Kroo Ba Gaew performed a ceremony to invite them to rise up from the waters to perform miracles for humanity, and come to reside at the temple.

 

The statues rose up from the depths and were able to be transported to the temple, where they reside to this day. It is said these Buddhas can make the rain fall in the proper season to make the crops grow, which is a matter of life and death from many farming communities in the region. The Buddhas are hence extremely sacred for the local devotees, and Kroo Ba Gaew’s miracle of calling them, is perhaps his most famous legend.

 

Luang Phu Kroo Ba Gaew’s amulets are extremely rare, because he never ever really focused on making amulets of many kinds. he would only release mainly Buddhist amulets such as his monk coins, and ‘Roop Tai’ blessėd monk photos, and items of reverence and practice such as the Prakam Saksit Blessėd Rosary. Devotees of Kroo Ba Gaew like to wear his rosaries with one of his coin amulets attached for prayer and protection of the Guru. HIs devotees are very reluctant to part with their amulets of Luang Phu Kroo Ba Gaew, for they believe them to possess very powerful protection, and bring auspicious blessings.

 

The Wongarn Pra Krueang Lanna Northern Amulet Appreciation Society have registered the pantheon of amulets of Kroo Ba Gaew as residing within the Dtamrap Pra Krueang Lanna Yord Niyom ‘Top List of Most Preferred Amulets of the Lanna Region’.

Use the Traditional Thai Buddhist Method for Bucha;

1. Chant Maha Namasakara (3 Times)

2. Chant the Trai Soranakom (3 Times)

3. Chant Kata Aaraatanaa Pra Krueang (3 Times)

Kata Maha Namasakara

Namo Dtat-Sa Pakawa-Dto Araha-Dto Sam-Maa Sam-Put-Dtat-Sa

Namo Dtat-Sa Pakawa-Dto Araha-Dto Sam-Maa Sam-Put-Dtat-Sa

Namo Dtat-Sa Pakawa-Dto Araha-Dto Sam-Maa Sam-Put-Dtat-Sa

 

Trai Soranakom

Puttang Cheewidtang Yaawa Nipaanang Saranang Kajchaami

Tammang Cheewidtang Yaawa Nipaanang Saranang Kajchaami

Sangkang Cheewidtang Yaawa Nipaanang Saranang Kajchaami

Tudtiyambpi Puttang Cheewidtang Yaawa Nipaanang Saranang Kajchaami

Tudtiyambpi Tammang Cheewidtang Yaawa Nipaanang Saranang Kajchaami

Tudtiyambpi Sangkang Cheewidtang Yaawa Nipaanang Saranang Kajchaami

Dtadtiyambpi Puttang Cheewidtang Yaawa Nipaanang Saranang Kajchaami

Dtadtiyambpi Tammang Cheewidtang Yaawa Nipaanang Saranang Kajchaami

Dtadtiyambpi Sangkang Cheewidtang Yaawa Nipaanang Saranang Kajchaami

 

Kata Aaraatana Pra Krueang

Puttang Aaraatanaanang

Tammang Aaraatanaanang

Sangkang Aaraatanaanang

Puttang Prasittimae

Tammang Prasittimae

Sangkang Prasittimae

 

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Rian Mangorn Koo Luang Phu Hmun Wat Ban Jan

A pristinely kept and extremely rare Rian Mangorn Koo Nuea Nava Loha Pim Pised Dtok Sorng Code Ma Wat Pha Nong Lom Run Sao Ha Maha Sethee 5th Lunar Saturday Blessing Ceremony Edition Guru Monk Coin, released in 2543 BE, to raise funds for the Kuti Songk Monks Huts and improve the facilities at the temple of Wat Pha Nong Lom.

Rian Mangorn Koo Nava Loha Solid Gold Casing LP Moon

Rian Mangorn Koo Nava Loha Solid Gold Casing LP Moon

This model of Rian Mangorn Koo twin dragons Monk Coin is a very rare Pim Pised (Niyom preferred) and differs from the majority of Rian Mangorn Koo Wat Pha Nong Lom Edition coins in Nava Loha, because of the double code MA stamp. Most coins of the Nava Loha series made for Wat Pha Nong Lom have only a single code Ma Stamp (on the Sangkati chest sash of the robe of Luang Phu), and only the Pim Pised special models received double code stamps. Only very few (unknown number) were distributed with double code stamp, making this not only a sacred, powerful master class amulet, but also a rare collectors piece.

Rian Mangorn Koo Solid Gold Casing Nava Loaha Code Ma x 2 LP Hmun Wat Ban Jan

Rian Mangorn Koo Solid Gold Casing Nava Loha 2543 BE Code Ma x 2 LP Hmun Wat Ban Jan

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The Rian Mangorn Koo of Luang Phu Hmun is, as are all of his amulets, known for the power of Jaroen Lap Wealth Increasement, and Lucky Fortunes, as well as for their Miraculous Protective Powers. Those born in the year of the dragon love to Bucha this amulet especially, for the obvious reason of the double dragon guardians.

Rian Mangorn Koo Magazine Entry featuring single code Ma Tong Daeng Version

Rian Mangorn Koo Magazine Entry featuring single code Ma Tong Daeng Version

For those with lower budgets, who seek power above collectability and rarity, we recommend to seek the Rian Mangorn Nuea Tong Daeng or Nava Loha single Code Ma, of the same edition, which carries a lower price than this special Nava Loha Pim Pised Gammagarn double code collectors edition model.

Rian Mangorn Koo Magazine Entry featuring the rare double code Ma Nava Loha Version

Rian Mangorn Koo Magazine Entry featuring the rare double code Ma Nava Loha Version

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